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Gullberg, Annica
Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Anderssson, K., Gullberg, A., Danielsson, A., Scantlebury, K. & Hussenius, A. (2019). Chafing borderlands: obstacles for science teaching and learning in preschool teacher education. Cultural Studies of Science Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chafing borderlands: obstacles for science teaching and learning in preschool teacher education
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2019 (English)In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

This study examines preservice preschool teachers’ university science education experience.The empirical data are from a research and intervention project conducted on teacher education programs at two Swedish universities. We analyzed one of the assignments completed by 111 students within a science course as well as their conversations about the assignment at a number of seminars. We combined culture contrast and thematic analysis to examine the data. The results showed a tension between the preschool culture and the university science culture. We described this tension between the boundary lines of the two cultures as a chafing borderland. These cultures do not merge, and the defined boundaries cause chafing with each other. We discuss ways of diminishing this chafing of borderlands, potential border crossings such as caring and children as boundary objects and equalizing power imbalances.

Keywords
Culture contrast, preschool culture, preservice preschool teachers, science culture, teacher education
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381509 (URN)10.1007/s11422-019-09934-x (DOI)
Projects
Challenging science teacher education: gender awareness in constructing knowledge of science and science teaching
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2010-5156
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-05-10
Hussenius, A., Gullberg, A. & Anderssson, K. (2018). Naturvetenskap och utbildning. En materiell, skev, "sexig" och skavande historia?. Tidskrift för genusvetenskap, 39(4), 2-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Naturvetenskap och utbildning. En materiell, skev, "sexig" och skavande historia?
2018 (Swedish)In: Tidskrift för genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 2-5Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

I detta temanummer om naturvetenskap och utbildning, går naturvetenskapen som en röd tråd genom samtliga artiklar och finns även med som en aspekt i frispel och recensioner. Genom åren har det tidigare förekommit ett antal artiklar på samma tema, samt några temanummer och artiklar med fokus på det närliggande teknikområdet. Naturvetenskap har också en gång tidigare varit föremål för ett temanummer, nämligen i dåvarande Kvinnovetenskaplig tidskrift, nummer 4 från 1984, som handlade om kvinnor och naturvetenskap. Då beskrevs vetenskapsområdet som ”kanske det forskningsfält, som längst lyckats hålla sig utom skotthåll för den feministiska vetenskapskritiken”, vilket förklarades med mansdominansen samt de naturvetenskapliga ämnenas förmåga att upprätthålla en bild som varande objektiva och värderingsfria. Inte mycket har hänt sedan dess; naturvetenskapen har lyckats bevara ett skimmer av objektivitet ochden är fortfarande en manlig bastion vad gäller högre positioner inom akademin, även inom biologiämnet som haft en majoritet av kvinnliga studenter åtminstone sedan 1980-talet. Exempel på hur detta kan ta sig uttryck idag ges i några av artiklarna i föreliggande nummer.

Vi hoppas att detta temanummer, med ett feministiskt insider-perspektiv på naturvetenskap, kan bidra med nya perspektiv på ämneskulturerna. Med förhoppning om givande och lärorik läsning,

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tidskrift för genusvetenskap, 2018
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383213 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2019-07-16Bibliographically approved
Gullberg, A., Anderssson, K., Danielsson, A., Scantlebury, K. & Hussenius, A. (2018). Pre-service teachers' views of the child: Reproducing or challenging gender stereotypes in science in preschool. Research in science education, 48(4), 691-715
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-service teachers' views of the child: Reproducing or challenging gender stereotypes in science in preschool
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2018 (English)In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 691-715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report how 47 pre-service teachers during their preschool placement in Sweden identify events related to gender and emerging science. We analysed their reflections on the situations with Gee’s Discourse analysis. Two dominant discourse models were identified: the Discourse Construare, where pre-service teachers assumed that children have potential interests in a variety of subjects, and the Discourse Essentia, where children were regarded to have a stable core identity. In the latter discourse, the pre-service teachers’ task would be to encourage the children to be who they are. The analysis found a connection between pre-service teachers’ views of the child and whether gender stereotypes were reproduced or counteracted. The Discourse Essentia is in conflict with the goal in the Swedish national curriculum that all children should learn science.  We discuss how the different discourses affect whether children are stimulated or inhibited in their emerging science activities and interests. Based on the results from an analysis of answers reflecting the Discourse Construare, we have designed a model illustrating a process for gender-aware teaching.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Gender; gender stereotyping; pre-service teachers; science education; teacher education; views of children
National Category
Didactics Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312432 (URN)10.1007/s11165-016-9593-z (DOI)000440114000002 ()
Projects
Challenging science teacher education: gender awareness in constructing knowledge of science and science teaching
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2010-5156
Available from: 2017-01-09 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2018-10-18Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, A., Anderssson, K., Gullberg, A., Hussénius, A. & Scantlebury, K. (2016). “In biology class we would just sit indoors…”: Experiences of insideness and outsideness in the places student teachers’ associate with science. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 11(4), 1115-1134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“In biology class we would just sit indoors…”: Experiences of insideness and outsideness in the places student teachers’ associate with science
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2016 (English)In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1115-1134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we explore the places pre- and primary school (K-6) student teachers associate with their science learning experiences and how they view the relationship between these places and science. In doing so, we use ‘place’ as an analytical entry point to deepen the understanding of pre- and primary school student teachers’ relationship to science. Inspired by theories from human geography we firstly explore how the university science classroom can be conceptualised as a meeting place, where trajectories of people as well as artefacts come together, using this conceptualisation as the stepping stone for arguing the importance of the place-related narrations of science the students bring to this classroom. We thereafter analyse how a sense of place, including affective dimensions, is reflected in Swedish student teachers’ science learning narratives (collected in the form of an essay assignment where the student teachers’ reflected upon their in and out of school science learning experiences). The empirical material consists of 120 student essays. The most prominent feature of the empirical material as a whole is the abundance of affective stories about the student teachers’ experiences in natural environments, often expressing a strong sense of belonging to, and identification with, a particular place. However, the student narratives also give voice to an ambivalent valuing of the affective experiences of natural environments. Sometimes such affective experiences are strongly delineated from what the students consider actual science knowledge, on other occasions, students, in a somewhat contradictious way, stress natural environments as the authentic place for doing science, in contrast to the perceived in-authenticity of teaching science in the classroom. When student teachers explicitly discuss the classroom as a place, this was almost without exception with strong negative emotions, experiences of outsideness and alienation.

Keywords
Teacher education; Place; Primary teacher education; Preschool teacher education
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261894 (URN)10.1007/s11422-015-9702-8 (DOI)000391425700018 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-5156
Available from: 2015-09-05 Created: 2015-09-05 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hussenius, A., Scantlebury, K., Andersson, K. & Gullberg, A. (2016). Interstitial spaces: A model for transgressive processes. In: Jacob Bull & Margaretha Fahlgren (Ed.), Illdisciplined Gender: Engaging Questions of Nature/Culture and Transgressive Encounters (pp. 11-30). Cham Heidelberg New York Dordrecht London: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interstitial spaces: A model for transgressive processes
2016 (English)In: Illdisciplined Gender: Engaging Questions of Nature/Culture and Transgressive Encounters / [ed] Jacob Bull & Margaretha Fahlgren, Cham Heidelberg New York Dordrecht London: Springer, 2016, p. 11-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham Heidelberg New York Dordrecht London: Springer, 2016
Series
Crossroads of knowledge, ISSN 2197-9634
Keywords
science, gender, feminism, identity, methalogues
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-214669 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-15272-1 (DOI)978-3-319-15271-4 (ISBN)978-3-319-15272-1 (ISBN)
Projects
GenNa - Nature/culture boundaries and transgressive encounters
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 344-2006-7267
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2016-04-25
Hussenius, A., Scantlebury, K., Anderssson, K. & Gullberg, A. (2016). Transgressing disciplinary borders: position-status-power as feminists within science/scientists within gender studies. In: ECER 2016: Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers: . Paper presented at ECER 2016 (European Conference on Education Research).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transgressing disciplinary borders: position-status-power as feminists within science/scientists within gender studies
2016 (English)In: ECER 2016: Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Coming from natural science disciplines into a research environment where transgressive encounters between cultural, social and biological understandings of sex and gender are characteristic, we examine how one can use transgressive identities to offer a feminist critique of traditional organizational and knowledge boundaries. We examine the different experiences that have caressed, chafed, pained, influenced and thus contributed to our shaping of our identities. Our focus is the challenges and advantages of engaging with, and participating in, the cultures of different disciplines.

 

Feminism promotes an awareness of, and a need to challenge, social power structures. Feminists have provided critical stances of scientific knowledge, the production of that knowledge and where the knowledge resides. While science is an obvious ‘target’ of a feminist critique, as researchers who operate in interstitial settings between feminism and science, science and education, our positions provide us the opportunity to examine the role of status and power in elevating one subject over another and to discuss how feminism, science and science education may intersect to produce new knowledge, practices and structures.

 

In this presentation we use the concepts of interstitial spaces and transgressive identities to examine the boundaries of gender and feminist studies, science, and education and discuss our research practices and positions. In doing so, our point of departure is our own experiences. Interstitial spaces exist between and within boundaries. These spaces are possible sites within a defined context (a discipline, a practice, a culture) that may be occupied by an actor/agent working as a “carrier” of different cultural practices, knowledge and theories. A “carrier” can use the interstitial space to influence and challenge a “new” context and thus loosen up boundaries, but can also by experiencing new cultures and developing new knowledge return to the “old” culture to integrate these new practices. Thus, interstitial spaces establish a context for transgressive identities to emerge so one can act in ways to transform and change the cultures of disciplines.

 

Hussénius, A., Scantlebury, K., Andersson, K., and Gullberg, A. (2015). Interstitial spaces: A model for transgressive processes. In J. Bull & M. Fahlgren (Eds.) Illdisciplined Gender - Engaging Questions of Nature/Culture and Transgressive Encounters. (pp. 11-30). Crossroads of Knowledge. Rotterdam: Springer Publishing.

National Category
Gender Studies Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287592 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2016 (European Conference on Education Research)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2016-04-25
Scantlebury, K., Hussenius, A., Anderssson, K., Gullberg, A. & Danielsson, A. (2015). Communicating through silence: Examining the unspoken and the unsaid in discussions about science. In: : . Paper presented at American Education Research Association (AERA).
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Gender Studies Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-253980 (URN)
Conference
American Education Research Association (AERA)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2014-939
Available from: 2015-06-04 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2016-04-25
Scantlebury, K., Hussenius, A., Anderssson, K., Gullberg, A. & Danielsson, A. (2015). Using spacetimemattering to engage science education with matter and material feminism. In: : . Paper presented at National Association of Research in Science Teaching (NARST).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using spacetimemattering to engage science education with matter and material feminism
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Gender Studies Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-253989 (URN)
Conference
National Association of Research in Science Teaching (NARST)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2014-939
Available from: 2015-06-04 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2016-04-25
Scantlebury, K., Hussenius, A., Anderssson, K., Gullberg, A. & Danielsson, A. (2015). Using spacetimemattering to engage science education with matter and material feminism. In: : . Paper presented at American Education Research Association (AERA).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using spacetimemattering to engage science education with matter and material feminism
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Didactics Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-253984 (URN)
Conference
American Education Research Association (AERA)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2014-939
Available from: 2015-06-04 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2016-04-25
Scantlebury, K., Hussenius, A., Gullberg, A., Anderssson, K. & Danielsson, A. (2014). Can material feminism make gender matter in 21st science education research?. In: : . Paper presented at National Association for Research in Science Teaching (Narst) Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can material feminism make gender matter in 21st science education research?
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research in gender and education has evolved from a focus on issues of equity and access, to difference and intersectionality, and more recently subjectivity and identity (Dillabough, McLeod, & Mills, 2009).  While science education research has continued its focus on access, difference, and identity, gender research within the field has become fused, and possibly lost, within other social categories (Scantlebury, in press). McRobbie (2009) labeled the erosion of feminist research through the devaluing of its ideas and goals as disarticulation. She argued that rather than producing new goals and themes across social categories, disarticulation acted as a ‘dispersal strategy’, to the detriment of all social groups.  Feminism was no longer viewed as a place where different subordinate groups could learn from each other and identify common political causes feminist ideals (McRobbie, 2009). 

Despite calls from feminist researchers for a more nuanced examination of gender in science education, such as, how various social categories intersect and interact with one’s gender (that is, intersectionality), using queer theory to challenge hetereonormative assumptions in science and schooling, and expanding data analysis to include a broader interpretation of gender than the dichotomy of feminine and masculine (Hussenius et al, 2013). Currently, the percentage of papers with ‘gender or feminist or equity’ as a research category in peer-reviewed science education articles is less than five percent (Hussenius et al, 2013).  In areas of science education research that produced the most published articles such as changing students’ conceptions or examining teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge, researchers have rarely addressed gender issues (Andersson 2010; 2013).  But science and science education are social organizations, and as such are gendered (Acker, 1990). Gender influences who studies, participates, and engages in science. An ongoing trend is that females are overrepresented in the biological/life sciences and males are disproportionally represented in the physical sciences (Hill et. al., 2010). Previously, researchers have suggested that achievement and attitudinal differences accounted for the gendered pattern of females’ and males’ science participation. However, meta-analytic studies have shown minimal differences in achievement between females and males (Hyde & Linn, 2006). Researchers suggest that larger societal structures, rather than differences between groups, explain why academically capable and qualified women chose not to enroll in physical science and/or engineering majors or more than three times the number of boys indicated their interest in a computing, engineering or mathematics career compared to girls (Sikora & Pokropek, 2012). However, gender studies at society’s structural level rarely examine outcomes in terms of gender and other social categories and the engagement of students in science remains highly gendered.

In the early 1990’s Haraway challenged feminists to engage with reality and an examination of language because science and technology and the discourse that built these areas produced a ‘matrix of domination’. Science education research rarely uses critical theories when producing knowledge and recommending changes to teacher preparation, curriculum that would interest and engage all students, or the pedagogical practices that would deconstruct a ‘matrix of domination’.  Barad (2003) argued that researchers had granted language ‘too much power” and called for feminists to re-engage with matter/material. 

Material feminism considers language and reality, and incorporates both into discussions of identity (Hekman, 2010). Material feminism offers a theoretical framework for science educators because it moves theorizing and analysis from the post modern and post humanities approaches to social critique that focused solely on language/discourse to incorporating matter. This theoretical paper introduces, and then discusses, how material feminism may offer a framework for science education researchers to re-examine how engaging with socio-cultural context as well as the physical contexts of learning, teaching and practicing science could make gender matter.

Keywords
gender, material feminism, science education
National Category
Gender Studies Other Natural Sciences Didactics
Research subject
Curriculum Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240370 (URN)
Conference
National Association for Research in Science Teaching (Narst) Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA
Projects
Challenging science teacher education: Gender awareness in constructingknowledge of science and science teaching
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2010-5156
Available from: 2015-01-07 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2016-04-25
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