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Niedzwiedzki, GrzegorzORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4775-5254
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Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Sulej, T. & Niedzwiedzki, G. (2019). An elephant-sized Late Triassic synapsid with erect limbs. Science, 363(6422), 78-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An elephant-sized Late Triassic synapsid with erect limbs
2019 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 363, no 6422, p. 78-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we describe the dicynodont Lisowicia bojani, from the Late Triassic of Poland, a gigantic synapsid with seemingly upright subcursorial limbs that reached an estimated length of more than 4.5 meters, height of 2.6 meters, and body mass of 9 tons. Lisowicia is the youngest undisputed dicynodont and the largest nondinosaurian terrestrial tetrapod from the Triassic. The lack of lines of arrested growth and the highly remodeled cortex of its limb bones suggest permanently rapid growth and recalls that of dinosaurs and mammals. The discovery of Lisowicia overturns the established picture of the Triassic megaherbivore radiation as a phenomenon restricted to dinosaurs and shows that stem-group mammals were capable of reaching body sizes that were not attained again in mammalian evolution until the latest Eocene.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375225 (URN)10.1126/science.aal4853 (DOI)000455315800064 ()30467179 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05248
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Qvarnström, M., Vikberg Wernström, J., Piechowski, R., Talanda, M., Ahlberg, P. E. & Niedzwiedzki, G. (2019). Beetle-bearing coprolites possibly reveal the diet of a Late Triassic dinosauriform. Royal Society Open Science, 6(3), Article ID 181042.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beetle-bearing coprolites possibly reveal the diet of a Late Triassic dinosauriform
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2019 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 181042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Diets of extinct animals can be difficult to analyse if no direct evidence, such as gut contents, is preserved in association with body fossils. Inclusions from coprolites (fossil faeces), however, may also reflect the diet of the host animal and become especially informative if the coprolite producer link can be established. Here we describe, based on propagation phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRμCT), the contents of five morphologically similar coprolites collected from two fossil-bearing intervals from the highly fossiliferous Upper Triassic locality at Krasiejow in Silesia, Poland. Beetle remains, mostly elytra, and unidentified exoskeleton fragments of arthropods are the most conspicuous inclusions found in the coprolites. The abundance of these inclusions suggests that the coprolite producer deliberately targeted beetles and similar small terrestrial invertebrates as prey, but the relatively large size of the coprolites shows that it was not itself a small animal. The best candidate from the body fossil record of the locality is the dinosauriform Silesaurus opolensis Dzik, 2003, which had an anatomy in several ways similar to those of bird-like neotheropod dinosaurs and modern birds. We hypothesize that the beak-like jaws of S. opolensis were used to efficiently peck small insects off the ground, a feeding behaviour analogous to some extant birds.

Keywords
coprolites, palaeoecology, Dinosauromorpha, beetle elytra, insectivore
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383880 (URN)10.1098/rsos.181042 (DOI)000465470300008 ()31031991 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05248
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Scholze, F., Golubev, V. K., Niedzwiedzki, G., Schneider, J. W. & Sennikov, A. G. (2019). Late Permian conchostracans (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) from continental deposits in the Moscow Syneclise, Russia. Journal of Paleontology, 93(1), 72-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Late Permian conchostracans (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) from continental deposits in the Moscow Syneclise, Russia
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 72-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Moscow Syneclise on the East European Platform is an important area for the study of the continental biota of late Permian to Early Triassic age in continuous sections. This study attempts a taxonomic description of the late Permian conchostracan fauna of this area. The rich, new material was collected, bed by bed, during geological and paleontological excavations of lacustrine and fluvial deposits of the Obnora Formation and Vokhma Formation of the late Permian Zhukovian Regional Stage near the towns of Vyazniki and Gorokhovets. The conchostracan fauna of the Zhukovian Regional Stage consists predominantly of Pseudestheria and less frequently of Palaeolimnadiopsis. In the earliest Triassic Vokhmian Regional Stage, a more diverse fauna including Euestheria, Magniestheria, Cornia, Palaeolimnadiopsis, and Rossolimnadiopsis was already recorded. The preliminary taxonomic determination of the pseudestheriids from the Zhukovian Regional Stage is intended to serve as a prerequisite for future studies of late Permian conchostracan biostratigraphy on the regional to interregional scale.

National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375842 (URN)10.1017/jpa.2018.58 (DOI)000455719500005 ()
Funder
German Research Foundation (DFG), SCHN408/22-1
Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Qvarnström, M., Ahlberg, P. & Niedzwiedzki, G. (2019). Tyrannosaurid-like osteophagy by a Triassic archosaur. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 925.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tyrannosaurid-like osteophagy by a Triassic archosaur
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here we present evidence for osteophagy in the Late Triassic archosaur Smok wawelski Niedzwiedzki, Sulej and Dzik, 2012, a large theropod-like predator from Poland. Ten medium to large-sized coprolites are matched, by their dimensions and by association with body fossils and footprints, to S. wawelski. The coprolites contain fragments of large serrated teeth as well as up to 50 percent by volume of bone fragments, with distinct fragmentation and angularity, from several prey taxa. This suggests pronounced osteophagy. Further evidence for bone-crushing behaviour is provided by isolated worn teeth, bone-rich regurgitalites (fossil regurgitates) and numerous examples of crushed or bite-marked dicynodont bones, all collected from the same bone-bearing beds in the Lipie Slaskie clay-pit. Several of the anatomical characters related to osteophagy, such as a massive head and robust body, seem to be shared by S. wawelski and the tyrannosaurids, despite their wide phylogenetic separation. These large predators thus provide evidence of convergence driven by similar feeding ecology at the beginning and end of the age of dinosaurs.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377342 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-37540-4 (DOI)000457128700002 ()30700743 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05248Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Qvarnström, M. & Niedźwiedzki, G. (2018). A new charophyte flora from the Upper Triassic of Skane (Sweden) and implications on biostratigraphy, taphonomy and the palaeoenvironment. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 249, 61-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new charophyte flora from the Upper Triassic of Skane (Sweden) and implications on biostratigraphy, taphonomy and the palaeoenvironment
2018 (English)In: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, ISSN 0034-6667, E-ISSN 1879-0615, Vol. 249, p. 61-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The record of fossil charophytes from Sweden was previously restricted to the Ladinian-earliest Carnian Falsterbo Formation. Here, we present a charophyte assemblage from the Upper Triassic KAgerod Formation exposed at the Balteberga Gorge (Sickle, southern Sweden) from the perspectives of taxonomy, taphonomy, palaeoecology and biostratigraphy. The microfossils originate from an interval of reddish sandy mudstone and are represented by rare fossil thalli, calcium carbonate encrustations of thalli and numerous calcified fructifications, called gyrogonites. The assemblage is relatively diverse, comprising six species belonging to four genera of the family Porocharaceae (Auerbachichara cf. rhaetica, Porochara sp., Stellatochara germanica, Stellatochara aff. subsphaerica, Stenochara aff. donetziana, Stenochara aff. kisielevskyi). Both the sedimentological context and the preservation of the charophyte remains point to an autochthonous origin for the charophyte-bearing strata. An autochthonous origin together with the habitat of modern charophytes, infer that the charophyte interval was deposited in shallow ephemeral pond or lake in a terrestrial setting. Their occurrence is also indicative of low amount of nutrients and the numerous thalli encrustations suggest a rather alkaline water composition. Some of the described species (Auerbachichara cf. rhaetica and Stellatochara aff. subsphaerica) are useful for biostratigraphical correlations which attributes the assemblage to the Auerbachichara rhaetica Range zone (sensu Bilan, 1991) in the proposed Germanic Triassic charophyte zonation. This range zone is assigned to a latest Carnian to late Norian age, strengthened by an interlayering with rocks containing a characteristic assemblage of palynomorphs (Corollina meyeriana subzone a and b) in the Upper Triassic of the Polish part of the Germanic Basin. The findings of the first Triassic thalli further strengthen the suggestion that the early Mesozoic fossil record of charophytes is not solely composed of oospores and gyrogonites. A better understanding of vegetative fossil remains (silicified thalli and encrustations) of charophytes may provide important future palaeoecological implications and links between recent and extinct forms. Our findings also provide evidence that charophyte occurrences in the ICagerod Formation are strictly controlled by palaeoenvironmental factors. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Gyrogonites, Porocharaceae, Carnian, Norian, Scandinavia
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346881 (URN)10.1016/j.revpalbo.2017.11.005 (DOI)000424184500006 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05248
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Niedzwiedzki, G. & Budziszewska-Karwowska, E. (2018). A new occurrence of the Late Triassic archosaur Smok in southern Poland. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 63(4), 703-712
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new occurrence of the Late Triassic archosaur Smok in southern Poland
2018 (English)In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 703-712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two isolated teeth, a dorsal vertebra, fragments of a humerus and femur, a fragmentary pubic "boot" and part of an ischium shaft, identified here as belonging to a large predatory archosaur were discovered in the Upper Triassic site at Marciszow near Zawiercie (southern Poland). Comparisons of the new fossils from Marciszow with the dorsal vertebrae, pubic "boot", ischium and femur of the theropod-like Smok wawelski from Lisowice (Silesia) reveal that the two taxa are very similar. Nevertheless, due to the lack of more diagnostic elements (e.g., braincase or cranial elements), we prefer to consider all described specimens from Marciszow as Smok sp. Smok sp. shares a low mound-like, anterior trochanter with trochanteric shelf on the femur, a massive pubic "boot" with a distinct depression (= bevelled area), and a transversely lenticular ischium shaft in cross-section with S. wawelski. Some observed characters of the dorsal vertebra (e.g., lack of some lamina, shape and position of zygapophyses), however, are different from S. wawelski and may also suggest that the new findings represent a second species of the genus in the Upper Triassic of Poland. The discovery of Smok sp. at Marciszow is significant because it is the second example of the co-occurrence of this genus with: (i) bones of a large dicynodont; and (ii) record of gnawed tetrapod bones. The discovery of Smok sp. and the lack of significant morphologic divergence from S. wawelski suggest that this taxon is the only large-bodied predator currently known from the Upper Triassic of Poland. This new evidence expands the record of the genus and contributes, in some measure, to our knowledge of the stratigraphical distribution of large predatory archosaurs from the Polish Upper Triassic bone-bearing levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INST PALEOBIOLOGII PAN, 2018
Keywords
Diapsida, Archosauromorpha, Archosauria, Late Triassic, Poland, Silesia
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372915 (URN)10.4202/app.00505.2018 (DOI)000452781900007 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05248
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Skrzycki, P., Niedzwiedzki, G. & Talanda, M. (2018). Dipnoan remains from the Lower-Middle Triassic of the Holy Cross Mountains and northeastern Poland, with remarks on dipnoan palaeobiogeography. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 496, 332-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dipnoan remains from the Lower-Middle Triassic of the Holy Cross Mountains and northeastern Poland, with remarks on dipnoan palaeobiogeography
2018 (English)In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 496, p. 332-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here we present a revision of dipnoans from the Middle-Upper Buntsandstein and the Lower Muschelkalk (Lower-Middle Triassic) of the Holy Cross Mountains (southeastern Poland) and from the Middle Buntsandstein of northeastern Poland. Two genera are identified: Arganodus and Ptychoceratodus. Specimens resemble synchronous species from the European part of Russia. It is the first Middle Triassic finding of Arganodus worldwide. Ptychoceratodus is reported for the first time from the Lower Triassic of Poland. It is its oldest known occurrence in Europe. The Holy Cross Mountains stands between the area of European Russia and the Central European Basin which were both inhabited by Arganodus and Ptychoceratodus in the Early-Middle Triassic. Resulting from a summary of palaeobiogeographic data of these two genera their distributional patterns are hypothesized herein. In the Early Triassic both genera often co-occurred in many regions. Starting from the Middle Triassic their ranges split into two almost separate ones. They reflect the palaeolatitudinal belts in the Late Triassic with Arganodus in the northern tropic belt and Ptychoceratodus along the palaeolatitudes 30 degrees.

Keywords
Lungfish, Tooth plates, Buntsandstein, Muschelkalk, Palaeobiogeography
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351618 (URN)10.1016/j.palaeo.2018.01.049 (DOI)000428973000025 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Zaton, M., Niedzwiedzki, G., Rakocinski, M., Blom, H. & Kear, B. P. (2018). Earliest Triassic metazoan bioconstructions from East Greenland reveal a pioneering benthic community in the immediate aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction. Global and Planetary Change, 167, 87-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Earliest Triassic metazoan bioconstructions from East Greenland reveal a pioneering benthic community in the immediate aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction
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2018 (English)In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 167, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine benthic ecosystems collapsed during the catastrophic end-Permian mass extinction, and subsequently endured a protracted phase of biotic recovery under harsh environmental conditions. In particular, metazoan reef communities almost totally disappeared and were replaced by microbe-dominated mounds during the latest Permian-earliest Triassic. Here we report the stratigraphically oldest exclusively metazoan bioconstructions from earliest Triassic (mid-Induan) strata in East Greenland - these formed within the first ca 300 ka after the Permian-Triassic boundary. Unlike the multitaxic sponge-microbe and bivalve-based buildups recorded from the Early Triassic peri-paleoequatorial Panthalassan and Tethyan margins, the East Greenland bioaccumulations developed within a restricted Boreal mid-paleolatitude seaway, and comprised a monospecific primary framework of microconchid 'lophophorate tubes with shell fragments and phosphatic debris cemented by biogenic calcite. Prostrate growth of the microconchids likely facilitated their accretion into successive sheet-like biostromes and small bioherms. These are associated with a regional paleoenvironmental shift towards well-oxygenated bottom waters, and locally punctuated sedimentation that created a favorable habitat. Although microconchids were both abundant and geographically widespread throughout the earliest Triassic, such buildups formed solely by these metazoans have not been reported from that time frame outside the Boreal Realm. These apparently flourished in the absence of more stable complex communities, and suggest that a locally variable, rather than ubiquitously sequential revival of metazoan bioconstruction activity took place in the immediate aftermath of the end-Permian extinction. However, these may also suggest that ecological recovery of benthic marine ecosystems following the end-Permian mass extinction might have started earlier in higher paleolatitudes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2018
Keywords
Microconchids, Boreal Realm, Reefs, Build-ups, Paleoecology, Biotic crisis
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361676 (URN)10.1016/j.gloplacha.2018.05.009 (DOI)000438322900007 ()
Funder
Swedish Polar Research SecretariatWallenberg Foundations
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Qvarnström, M., Szrek, P., Ahlberg, P. E. & Niedzwiedzki, G. (2018). Non-marine palaeoenvironment associated to the earliest tetrapod tracks. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 1074.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-marine palaeoenvironment associated to the earliest tetrapod tracks
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 1074Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Opinions differ on whether the evolution of tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) from lobe-finned fishes was directly linked to terrestrialization. The earliest known tetrapod fossils, from the Middle Devonian (approximately 390 million years old) of Zachelmie Quarry in Poland, are trackways made by limbs with digits; they document a direct environmental association and thus have the potential to help answer this question. However, the tetrapod identity of the tracks has recently been challenged, despite their well-preserved morphology, on account of their great age and supposedly shallow marine (intertidal or lagoonal) depositional environment. Here we present a new palaeoenvironmental interpretation of the track-bearing interval from Zachelmie, showing that it represents a succession of ephemeral lakes with a restricted and non-marine biota, rather than a marginal marine environment as originally thought. This context suggests that the trackmaker was capable of terrestrial locomotion, consistent with the appendage morphology recorded by the footprints, and thus provides additional support for a tetrapod identification.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343675 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-19220-5 (DOI)000422739300037 ()29348562 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
Bremer, O., Niedzwiedzki, G., Blom, H., Dec, M. & Kozłowski, W. (2018). Vertebrate microremains from the upper Silurian Winnica Formation of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. Geological Magazine, 155(7), 1523-1541
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vertebrate microremains from the upper Silurian Winnica Formation of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland
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2018 (English)In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 155, no 7, p. 1523-1541Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vertebrate microremains from the upper Silurian Winnica Formation in the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland are described from the Winnica and Rzepin sections. Both sites record the uppermost part of the Supianka Member, but represent different depositional environments. The Winnica samples come from a low-energy environment, while the Rzepin sample was taken from a high-energy, oolitic facies. Both sites contain thelodonts Thelodus parvidens, Thelodus trilobatus, an anaspid cf. Liivilepis and a number of acanthodian scales of 'nostolepid', poracanthodid and 'gomphonchid' types. Notable differences between the sites are the addition of the osteostracan Tahulaspis cf. ordinata, the thelodont Paralogania ludlowiensis and acanthodian scales identified as Nostolepis gracilis in the Rzepin section. Placing the vertebrate faunas within the vertebrate biozonation established for the Silurian proved difficult. The suggested late Ludlow age for the Supianka Member based on sequence stratigraphical and chemostratigraphical correlations cannot be definitely confirmed or refuted, but a late Ludfordian age seems the most plausible based on invertebrate and vertebrate faunas. The much lower abundance of poracanthodid acanthodians in the Rzepin sample supports the notion of Poracanthodes porosus Zone as a deep-water equivalent to a number of vertebrate biozones. The presence of P. ludlowiensis only in the oolitic sample confirms a long temporal range, but restricted environmental distribution for this taxon.

National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281657 (URN)10.1017/S0016756817000681 (DOI)000443814900008 ()
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4775-5254

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