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Carlbom, Ingrid
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Avenel, C., Tolf, A., Dragomir, A. & Carlbom, I. (2019). Glandular Segmentation of Prostate Cancer: An Illustration of How the Choice of Histopathological Stain Is One Key to Success for Computational Pathology. Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, 7, Article ID 125.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glandular Segmentation of Prostate Cancer: An Illustration of How the Choice of Histopathological Stain Is One Key to Success for Computational Pathology
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2296-4185, Vol. 7, article id 125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Digital pathology offers the potential for computer-aided diagnosis, significantly reducing the pathologists' workload and paving the way for accurate prognostication with reduced inter-and intra-observer variations. But successful computer-based analysis requires careful tissue preparation and image acquisition to keep color and intensity variations to a minimum. While the human eye may recognize prostate glands with significant color and intensity variations, a computer algorithm may fail under such conditions. Since malignancy grading of prostate tissue according to Gleason or to the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system is based on architectural growth patterns of prostatic carcinoma, automatic methods must rely on accurate identification of the prostate glands. But due to poor color differentiation between stroma and epithelium from the common stain hematoxylin-eosin, no method is yet able to segment all types of glands, making automatic prognostication hard to attain. We address the effect of tissue preparation on glandular segmentation with an alternative stain, Picrosirius red-hematoxylin, which clearly delineates the stromal boundaries, and couple this stain with a color decomposition that removes intensity variation. In this paper we propose a segmentation algorithm that uses image analysis techniques based on mathematical morphology and that can successfully determine the glandular boundaries. Accurate determination of the stromal and glandular morphology enables the identification of the architectural pattern that determine the malignancy grade and classify each gland into its appropriate Gleason grade or ISUP Grade Group. Segmentation of prostate tissue with the new stain and decomposition method has been successfully tested on more than 11000 objects including well-formed glands (Gleason grade 3), cribriform and fine caliber glands (grade 4), and single cells (grade 5) glands.

Keywords
digital pathology, computational pathology, prostate cancer, prostate gland segmentation, histopathological stain, Picrosirius red, hematoxylin
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Research subject
Computerized Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391013 (URN)10.3389/fbioe.2019.00125 (DOI)000475372000001 ()31334225 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-5418Swedish Research Council, 2012-3667Vinnova, 2017-00444Vinnova, 2018-02137
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Olsson, P., Nysjö, F., Carlbom, I. B. & Johansson, S. (2016). Comparison of walking and traveling-wave piezoelectric motors as actuators in kinesthetic haptic devices. IEEE Transactions on Haptics, 9(3), 427-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of walking and traveling-wave piezoelectric motors as actuators in kinesthetic haptic devices
2016 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Haptics, ISSN 1939-1412, E-ISSN 2329-4051, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 427-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Piezoelectric motors offer an attractive alternative to electromagnetic actuators in portable haptic interfaces: they are compact, have a high force-to-volume ratio, and can operate with limited or no gearing. However, the choice of a piezoelectric motor type is not obvious due to differences in performance characteristics. We present our evaluation of two commercial, operationally different, piezoelectric motors acting as actuators in two kinesthetic haptic grippers, a walking quasi-static motor and a traveling wave ultrasonic motor. We evaluate each gripper's ability to display common virtual objects including springs, dampers, and rigid walls, and conclude that the walking quasi-static motor is superior at low velocities. However, for applications where high velocity is required, traveling wave ultrasonic motors are a better option.

National Category
Human Computer Interaction Robotics
Research subject
Computerized Image Processing; Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-262371 (URN)10.1109/TOH.2016.2537803 (DOI)000384670000012 ()27046907 (PubMedID)
Funder
Vårdal FoundationVINNOVA
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Avenel, C. & Carlbom, I. (2015). Blur detection and visualization in histological whole slide images. In: Proc. 10th International Conference on Mass Data Analysis of Images and Signals: . Paper presented at MDA 2015, July 11–14, Hamburg, Germany. Leipzig, Germany: IBaI
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blur detection and visualization in histological whole slide images
2015 (English)In: Proc. 10th International Conference on Mass Data Analysis of Images and Signals, Leipzig, Germany: IBaI , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Digital pathology holds the promise of improved workflow and also of the use of image analysis to extract features from tissue samples for quantitative analysis to improve current subjective analysis of, for example, cancer tissue. But this requires fast and reliable image digitization. In this paper we address image blurriness, which is a particular problem with very large images or tissue micro arrays scanned with whole slide scanners, since autofocus methods may fail when there is a large variation in image content. We introduce a method to detect, quantify and dis-play blurriness from whole slide images (WSI) in real-time. We describe a blurriness measurement based on an ideal high pass filter in the frequency domain. In contrast with other method our method does not require any prior knowledge of the image content, and it produces a continuous blurriness map over the entire WSI. This map can be displayed as an overlay of the original data and viewed at different levels of magnification with zoom and pan features. The computation time for an entire WSI is around 5 minutes on an average workstation, which is about 180 times faster than existing methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leipzig, Germany: IBaI, 2015
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Research subject
Computerized Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-273832 (URN)
Conference
MDA 2015, July 11–14, Hamburg, Germany
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2016-01-20
Olsson, P., Nysjö, F., Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A., Thor, A., Hirsch, J.-M. & Carlbom, I. B. (2015). Haptics-assisted Virtual Planning of Bone, Soft Tissue, and Vessels in Fibula Osteocutaneous Free Flaps. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, 3(8), Article ID e479.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haptics-assisted Virtual Planning of Bone, Soft Tissue, and Vessels in Fibula Osteocutaneous Free Flaps
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2015 (English)In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 3, no 8, article id e479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Virtual surgery planning has proven useful for reconstructing head and neck defects by fibula osteocutaneous free flaps (FOFF). Benefits include improved healing, function, and aesthetics, as well as cost savings. But available virtual surgery planning systems incorporating fibula in craniomaxillofacial reconstruction simulate only bone reconstruction without considering vessels and soft tissue.

Methods: The Haptics-Assisted Surgery Planning (HASP) system incorporates bone, vessels, and soft tissue of the FOFF in craniomaxillofacial defect reconstruction. Two surgeons tested HASP on 4 cases they had previously operated on: 3 with composite mandibular defects and 1 with a composite cervical spine defect. With the HASP stereographics and haptic feedback, using patient-specific computed tomography angiogram data, the surgeons planned the 4 cases, including bone resection, fibula design, recipient vessels selection, pedicle and perforator location selection, and skin paddle configuration.

Results: Some problems encountered during the actual surgery could have been avoided as they became evident with HASP. In one case, the fibula reconstruction was incomplete because the fibula had to be reversed and thus did not reach the temporal fossa. In another case, the fibula had to be rotated 180 degrees to correct the plate and screw placement in relation to the perforator. In the spinal case, difficulty in finding the optimal fibula shape and position required extra ischemia time.

Conclusions: The surgeons found HASP to be an efficient planning tool for FOFF reconstructions. The testing of alternative reconstructions to arrive at an optimal FOFF solution preoperatively potentially improves patient function and aesthetics and reduces operating room time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2015
National Category
Medical Image Processing Surgery
Research subject
Computerized Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260771 (URN)10.1097/GOX.0000000000000447 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-24 Last updated: 2016-01-20Bibliographically approved
Olsson, P., Nysjö, F., Singh, N., Thor, A. & Carlbom, I. (2015). Visuohaptic bone saw simulator: Combining vibrotactile and kinesthetic feedback. In: Proc. 8th ACM SIGGRAPH Asia Technical Briefs: . Paper presented at ACM SIGGRAPH Asia 2015, November 2–5, Kobe, Japan (pp. 10:1-4). New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visuohaptic bone saw simulator: Combining vibrotactile and kinesthetic feedback
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2015 (English)In: Proc. 8th ACM SIGGRAPH Asia Technical Briefs, New York: ACM Press, 2015, p. 10:1-4Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2015
National Category
Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
Research subject
Computerized Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-262369 (URN)10.1145/2820903.2820925 (DOI)978-1-4503-3930-8 (ISBN)
Conference
ACM SIGGRAPH Asia 2015, November 2–5, Kobe, Japan
Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Nysjö, F., Olsson, P., Hirsch, J.-M. & Carlbom, I. B. (2014). Custom Mandibular Implant Design with Deformable Models and Haptics. In: Proc. Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery (CARS). Fukuoka, Japan, June 25-28: . Paper presented at CARS 2014, Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, Computed Maxillofacial Imaging for Dental Implantology, 28th International Congress and Exhibition Fukuoka, Japan, June 25-28, 2014 (pp. 246-247). Springer Berlin/Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Custom Mandibular Implant Design with Deformable Models and Haptics
2014 (English)In: Proc. Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery (CARS). Fukuoka, Japan, June 25-28, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 246-247Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014
Keywords
CMF surgery planning, mandibular implant design, haptics, deformable models
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Research subject
Computerized Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-238302 (URN)10.1007/s11548-014-1043-7 (DOI)
Conference
CARS 2014, Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, Computed Maxillofacial Imaging for Dental Implantology, 28th International Congress and Exhibition Fukuoka, Japan, June 25-28, 2014
Projects
Haptics and its Applications to Medicine
Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-12-11 Last updated: 2014-12-15
Olsson, P., Nysjö, F., Hirsch, J.-M. & Carlbom, I. B. (2013). A haptics-assisted cranio-maxillofacial surgery planning system for restoring skeletal anatomy in complex trauma cases. International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, 8(6), 887-894
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A haptics-assisted cranio-maxillofacial surgery planning system for restoring skeletal anatomy in complex trauma cases
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, ISSN 1861-6410, E-ISSN 1861-6429, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 887-894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) surgery to restore normal skeletal anatomy in patients with serious trauma to the face can be both complex and time-consuming. But it is generally accepted that careful pre-operative planning leads to a better outcome with a higher degree of function and reduced morbidity in addition to reduced time in the operating room. However, today's surgery planning systems are primitive, relying mostly on the user's ability to plan complex tasks with a two-dimensional graphical interface. A system for planning the restoration of skeletal anatomy in facial trauma patients using a virtual model derived from patient-specific CT data. The system combines stereo visualization with six degrees-of-freedom, high-fidelity haptic feedback that enables analysis, planning, and preoperative testing of alternative solutions for restoring bone fragments to their proper positions. The stereo display provides accurate visual spatial perception, and the haptics system provides intuitive haptic feedback when bone fragments are in contact as well as six degrees-of-freedom attraction forces for precise bone fragment alignment. A senior surgeon without prior experience of the system received 45 min of system training. Following the training session, he completed a virtual reconstruction in 22 min of a complex mandibular fracture with an adequately reduced result. Preliminary testing with one surgeon indicates that our surgery planning system, which combines stereo visualization with sophisticated haptics, has the potential to become a powerful tool for CMF surgery planning. With little training, it allows a surgeon to complete a complex plan in a short amount of time.

National Category
Medical Image Processing Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198977 (URN)10.1007/s11548-013-0827-5 (DOI)000326455900002 ()23605116 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-04-21 Created: 2013-04-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Olsson, P., Nysjö, F., Hirsch, J.-M. & Carlbom, I. B. (2013). Snap-to-fit, a Haptic 6 DOF Alignment Tool for Virtual Assembly. In: Proc. World Haptics (WHC), 2013 IEEE: . Paper presented at IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), 14-18 April, 2013, Daejeon, SOUTH KOREA (pp. 205-210).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Snap-to-fit, a Haptic 6 DOF Alignment Tool for Virtual Assembly
2013 (English)In: Proc. World Haptics (WHC), 2013 IEEE, 2013, p. 205-210Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Virtual assembly of complex objects has application in domains ranging from surgery planning to archaeology. In these domains the objective is to plan the restoration of skeletal anatomy or archaeological artifacts to achieve an optimal reconstruction without causing further damage. While graphical modeling plays a central role in virtual assembly, visual feedback alone is often insufficient since object contact and penetration is difficult to discern due to occlusion. Haptics can improve an assembly task by giving feedback when objects collide, but precise fitting of fractured objects guided by delicate haptic cues similar to those present in the physical world requires haptic display transparency beyond the performance of today’s systems. We propose a haptic alignment tool that combines a 6 Degrees of Freedom (DOF) attraction force with traditional 6 DOF contact forces to pull a virtual object towards a local stable fit with a fixed object. The object forces are integrated into a virtual coupling framework yielding a stable haptic tool. We demonstrate the use of our system on applications from both cranio-maxillofacial surgery and archaeology, and show that we can achieve haptic rates for fractured surfaces with over 5000 points.

Keywords
Virtual Assembly, Force Feedback, Haptic Rendering, Fractured Object, Virtual Environments, 3D puzzle
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Interaction Technologies Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209551 (URN)10.1109/WHC.2013.6548409 (DOI)000325187400035 ()978-1-4799-0087-9 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), 14-18 April, 2013, Daejeon, SOUTH KOREA
Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Azar, J., Busch, C. & Carlbom, I. (2012). Histological Stain Evaluation for Machine Learning Applications. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention: . Paper presented at MICCAI 2012, the 15th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, October 1-5, 2012, Nice, France.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Histological Stain Evaluation for Machine Learning Applications
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183619 (URN)
Conference
MICCAI 2012, the 15th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, October 1-5, 2012, Nice, France
Available from: 2012-10-30 Created: 2012-10-30 Last updated: 2015-01-23
Azar, J., Busch, C. & Carlbom, I. (2012). Microarray Core Detection by Geometric Restoration. Analytical Cellular Pathology, 35(5-6), 381-393
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microarray Core Detection by Geometric Restoration
2012 (English)In: Analytical Cellular Pathology, ISSN 0921-8912, E-ISSN 1878-3651, Vol. 35, no 5-6, p. 381-393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whole-slide imaging of tissue microarrays (TMAs) holds the promise of automated image analysis of a large number of histopathological samples from a single slide. This demands high-throughput image processing to enable analysis of these tissue samples for diagnosis of cancer and other conditions. In this paper, we present a completely automated method for the accurate detection and localization of tissue cores that is based on geometric restoration of the core shapes without placing any assumptions on grid geometry. The method relies on hierarchical clustering in conjunction with the Davies-Bouldin index for cluster validation in order to estimate the number of cores in the image wherefrom we estimate the core radius and refine this estimate using morphological granulometry. The final stage of the algorithm reconstructs circular discs from core sections such that these discs cover the entire region of each core regardless of the precise shape of the core. The results show that the proposed method is able to reconstruct core locations without any evidence of localization error. Furthermore, the algorithm is more efficient than existing methods based on the Hough transform for circle detection. The algorithm's simplicity, accuracy, and computational efficiency allow for automated high-throughput analysis of microarray images.

National Category
Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183618 (URN)10.3233/ACP-2012-0067 (DOI)000311675800005 ()22684152 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-10-30 Created: 2012-10-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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