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Langenskiöld, Sophie
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Ssegonja, R., Alaie, I., Philipson, A., Hagberg, L., Sampaio, F., Möller, M., . . . Feldman, I. (2019). Depressive disorders in adolescence, recurrence in early adulthood, and healthcare usage in mid-adulthood: A longitudinal cost-of-illness study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 258, 33-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive disorders in adolescence, recurrence in early adulthood, and healthcare usage in mid-adulthood: A longitudinal cost-of-illness study
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 258, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with increased healthcare consumption in adulthood, but prior research has not recognized the heterogeneity of depressive disorders. This paper investigated the additional healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood for individuals with adolescent depression, and examined the mediating role of subsequent depression in early adulthood.

Methods: This study was based on the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Sweden in the early 1990s. Depressive disorders were assessed in adolescence (age 16-17) and early adulthood (age 19-30). Healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood (age 31-40) were estimated using nationwide population-based registries. Participants with specific subtypes of adolescent depression (n = 306) were compared with matched non-depressed peers (n = 213).

Results: Women with persistent depressive disorder (PDD) in adolescence utilized significantly more healthcare resources in mid-adulthood. The association was not limited to psychiatric care, and remained after adjustment for individual and parental characteristics. The total additional annual cost for a single age group of females with a history of PDD at a population level was estimated at 3.10 million USD. Depression recurrence in early adulthood mediated the added costs for psychiatric care, but not for somatic care.

Limitations: Primary health care data were not available, presumably resulting in an underestimation of the true healthcare consumption. Estimates for males had limited precision due to a relatively small male proportion.

Conclusions: On a population level, the additional healthcare costs incurred in mid-adulthood in females with a history of adolescent PDD are considerable. Early treatment and prevention should be prioritized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER, 2019
Keywords
Adolescence, Depression, Direct costs, Adulthood, Psychiatric healthcare, Non-psychiatric healthcare
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393715 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.077 (DOI)000482176400004 ()31382102 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-10092Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council FormasVinnova
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Veldwijk, J., Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C. G. M., Kihlbom, U., Langenskiöld, S., Dekker, E., Kallenberg, F. G. J., . . . Lambooij, M. S. (2019). How psychological distance of a study sample in discrete choice experiments affects preference measurement: a colorectal cancer screening case study. Patient Preference and Adherence, 13, 273-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How psychological distance of a study sample in discrete choice experiments affects preference measurement: a colorectal cancer screening case study
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2019 (English)In: Patient Preference and Adherence, ISSN 1177-889X, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 13, p. 273-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent the outcomes of a discrete choice experiment (DCE) differ based on respondents' psychological distance to the decision at hand. Methods: A DCE questionnaire regarding individuals' preferences for genetic screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) within the Dutch national CRC screening program was created. The DCE contained nine D-efficient designed choice tasks and was distributed among two populations that differ in their psychological distance to the decision at hand: 1) a representative sample of the Dutch general population aged 55-65 years, and 2) a sample of Dutch individuals who attended an information appointment regarding colonoscopies following the detection of blood in their stool sample in the CRC screening program. The DCE consisted of four attributes related to the decision whether to participate in genetic screening for CRC: 1) risk of being genetically predisposed, 2) risk of developing CRC, 3) frequency of follow-up colonoscopies, and 4) survival. Direct attribute ranking, dominant decision-making behavior, and relative importance scores (based on panel MIXL) were compared between the two populations. Attribute level estimates were compared with the Swait and Louviere test. Results: The proportion of respondents who both ranked survival as the most important attribute, and showed dominant decision-making behavior for this attribute, was significantly higher in the screened population compared to the general population. The relative importance scores of the attributes significantly differed between populations. Finally, the Swait and Louviere test also revealed significant differences in attribute level estimates in both the populations. Conclusion: The study outcomes differed between populations depending on their psychological distance to the decision. This study shows the importance of adequate sample selection; therefore, it is advocated to increase attention to study sample selection and reporting in DCE studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2019
Keywords
discrete choice experiment, preferences, stated preferences, sample, psychological distance, genetic screening
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377980 (URN)10.2147/PPA.S180994 (DOI)000458900800001 ()
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Ssegonja, R., Nystrand, C., Feldman, I., Sarkadi, A., Langenskiöld, S. & Jonsson, U. (2019). Indicated preventive interventions for depression in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis and meta-regression. Preventive Medicine, 118, 7-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicated preventive interventions for depression in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis and meta-regression
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2019 (English)In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 118, p. 7-15Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression contributes about 2% to the global burden of disease. A first onset of depressive disorder or subsyndromal depressive symptoms is common in adolescence, indicating that early prevention is a priority. However, trials of preventive interventions for depression in youths show conflicting results. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of group-based cognitive behavioral therapy (GB-CBT) as a preventive intervention targeting subsyndromal depression in children and adolescents. In addition, the impact of different covariates (type of comparator and use of booster sessions) was assessed. Relevant articles were identified from previous systematic reviews, and supplemented with an electronic search spanning from 01/09/2014 to 28/02/2018. The retrieved articles were assessed for eligibility and risk of bias. Relevant data were extracted. Intervention effectiveness was pooled using a random-effects model and the impact of covariates assessed using meta-regression. 38 eligible articles (34 trials) were obtained. The analysis showed GB-CBT to significantly reduce the incidence (relative risk 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.87) and symptoms (Cohen's d -0.22, 95% CI -0.32 to -0.11) of depression at post-test compared to all controls. Comparisons with passive comparators suggested that the effect decayed over time. However, compared to active controls, a significant intervention effect was evident only after 12 month or more. Our results suggest that the preventive effect of GB-CBT wears off, but still lasts longer than the effect of active comparators. Only a few studies included booster sessions, precluding firm conclusions. Future studies should clarify to what extent maintenance strategies can prolong the preventive effect of GB-CBT.

Keywords
Depression, Dysthymia, Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Meta-analysis, Meta-regression, Indicated prevention interventions
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375899 (URN)10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.09.021 (DOI)000454933300002 ()30287331 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-10092Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council FormasVINNOVA
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Viberg, J., Langenskiöld, S., Segerdahl, P., Hansson, M. G., Hösterey, U. U., Gummesson, A. & Veldwijk, J. (2019). Research participants' preferences for receiving genetic risk information: a discrete choice experiment. Genetics in Medicine, 21(10), 2381-2389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research participants' preferences for receiving genetic risk information: a discrete choice experiment
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2019 (English)In: Genetics in Medicine, ISSN 1098-3600, E-ISSN 1530-0366, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 2381-2389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study aims to determine research participants’ preferences for receiving genetic risk information when participating in a scientific study that uses genome sequencing.

Methods: A discrete choice experiment questionnaire was sent to 650 research participants (response rate 60.5%). Four attributes were selected for the questionnaire: type of disease, disease penetrance probability, preventive opportunity, and effectiveness of the preventive measure. Panel mixed logit models were used to determine attribute level estimates and the heterogeneity in preferences. Relative importance of the attribute and the predicted uptake for different information scenarios were calculated from the estimates. In addition, this study estimates predicted uptake for receiving genetic risk information in different scenarios.

Results: All characteristics influenced research participants’ willingness to receive genetic risk information. The most important characteristic was the effectiveness of the preventive opportunity. Predicted uptake ranged between 28% and 98% depending on what preventive opportunities and levels of effectiveness were presented.

Conclusion: Information about an effective preventive measure was most important for participants. They valued that attribute twice as much as the other attributes. Therefore, when there is an effective preventive measure, risk communication can be less concerned with the magnitude of the probability of developing disease.

 

Keywords
secondary findings, incidental findings, genetic risk information, research participants, preferences for genetic risk information
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-385799 (URN)10.1038/s41436-019-0511-4 (DOI)000488530100028 ()30992550 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, PR2013-0123EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 305444Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2019-06-17 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Ssegonja, R., Nystrand, C., Feldman, I., Sarkadi, A., Langenskiöld, S. & Jonsson, U. (2018). Indicated Preventive Interventions for Depression in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis And Meta-Regression. Value in Health, 21, S181-S181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicated Preventive Interventions for Depression in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis And Meta-Regression
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2018 (English)In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 21, p. S181-S181Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366684 (URN)10.1016/j.jval.2018.04.1234 (DOI)000438630000353 ()
Available from: 2018-11-23 Created: 2018-11-23 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Viberg, J., Segerdahl, P., Hösterey Ugander, U., Hansson, M. G. & Langenskiöld, S. (2018). Making sense of genetic risk: A qualitative focus-group study of healthy participants in genomic research. Patient Education and Counseling, 101(3), 422-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making sense of genetic risk: A qualitative focus-group study of healthy participants in genomic research
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2018 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 101, no 3, p. 422-427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

It is well known that research participants want to receive genetic risk information that is about high risks, serious diseases and potential preventive measures. The aim of this study was to explore, by qualitative means, something less well known: how do healthy research participants themselves make sense of genetic risk information?

Method

A phenomenographic approach was chosen to explore research participants’ understanding and assessment of genetic risk. We conducted four focus-group (N = 16) interviews with participants in a research programme designed to identify biomarkers for cardiopulmonary disease.

Results

Among the research participants, we found four ways of understanding genetic risk: as a binary concept, as an explanation, as revealing who I am (knowledge of oneself) and as affecting life ahead.

Conclusion

Research participants tend to understand genetic risk as a binary concept. This does not necessarily imply a misunderstanding of, or an irrational approach to, genetic risk. Rather, it may have a heuristic function in decision-making.

Practical implications

Risk communication may be enhanced by tailoring the communication to the participants’ own lay conceptions. For example, researchers and counselors should address risk in binary terms, maybe looking out for how individual participants search for threshold figures.

Keywords
Lay understanding; Conception of genetic risk; Making sense of genetic risk in research; Genetic risk communication
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330221 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2017.09.009 (DOI)000427826300007 ()
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-08-01Bibliographically approved
Hjorth, M., Sjöberg, D., Svanberg, A., Kaminsky, E., Langenskiöld, S. & Rorsman, F. (2018). Nurse-led clinic for patients with liver cirrhosis-effects on health-related quality of life: study protocol of a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial.. BMJ Open, 8(10), Article ID e023064.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse-led clinic for patients with liver cirrhosis-effects on health-related quality of life: study protocol of a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial.
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2018 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 10, article id e023064Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Liver cirrhosis affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) even in its early stages. Morbidity is especially high when the disease decompensates and self-care actions become essential. Nurse involvement in secondary prevention in other chronic diseases has contributed to better symptom control, less need of inpatient care and improved HRQoL. In order to evaluate the impact of nurse involvement in the follow-up of patients with liver cirrhosis, we decided to compare structured nurse-led clinics, inspired by Dorothea Orem's nursing theory and motivational strategies, with a group of patients receiving standard care. The primary outcome is HRQoL and the secondary outcomes are quality of care, visits to outpatient clinics or hospitals, disease progress and health literacy.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a pragmatic, multicentre randomised controlled study conducted at six Swedish hepatology departments. Eligible patients are adults with diagnosed cirrhosis of the liver (n=500). Participants are randomised into either an intervention with nurse-led follow-up group or into a standard of care group. Recruitment started in November 2016 and is expected to proceed until 2020. Primary outcomes are physical and mental HRQoL measured by RAND-36 at enrolment, after 1 and 2 years.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is ethically approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Uppsala. The results shall be disseminated in international conferences and peer-reviewed articles.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02957253; Pre-results.

Keywords
economics, health-related quality of life, liver cirrhosis, nurse-led clinic, nursing, qualituy of care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366222 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-023064 (DOI)000454739500129 ()30337316 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-18 Created: 2018-11-18 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Ssegonja, R., Pihl, C., Zethraeus, N. & Langenskiöld, S. (2017). How Robust are Economic Evaluations of Parenting Programs for Managing Conduct Disorder?: A Systematic Literature Review. Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, 20(S1), S31-S32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Robust are Economic Evaluations of Parenting Programs for Managing Conduct Disorder?: A Systematic Literature Review
2017 (English)In: Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X, Vol. 20, no S1, p. S31-S32Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331377 (URN)000400956000066 ()
Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-18 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Nystrand, C., Jonsson, U., Feldman, I., Langenskiöld, S., Sarkadi, A. & Ssegonja, R. (2017). Indicated preventive interventions for depression in Children and Adolescents: A meta-analysis. European Journal of Public Health, 27, 371-371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicated preventive interventions for depression in Children and Adolescents: A meta-analysis
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, p. 371-371Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345670 (URN)000414389804070 ()
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S., Johansson, P. & Langenskiöld, S. (2017). What is the right profile for getting a job?: A stated choice experiment of the recruitment process. Empirical Economics, 53(2), 803-826
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the right profile for getting a job?: A stated choice experiment of the recruitment process
2017 (English)In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 803-826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study the recruitment behaviour of Swedish employers using data from a stated choice experiment. In the experiment, the employers are first asked to describe an employee who recently and voluntarily left the firm and then to choose between two hypothetical applicants to invite to a job interview or to hire as a replacement for their previous employee. The two applicants differ with respect to characteristics such as gender, age, education, work experience, ethnicity, religious beliefs, family situation, weight, and health, but otherwise have similar characteristics as the previous employee. Our results show that employers prefer not to recruit applicants who are old, non-European, Muslim, Jewish, obese, have several children, or have a history of sickness absence. We also calculate the reduction in wage costs needed to make employers indifferent between applicants with and without these characteristics, and find that wage costs would have to be reduced by up to 50 % for applicants with some characteristics.

Keywords
Stated choice experiment, Discrimination, Age, Ethnicity, Obesity, Sickness absence
National Category
Economics and Business Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334923 (URN)10.1007/s00181-016-1133-1 (DOI)000407847400017 ()
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
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