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Carlsson, Axel C
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Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Carlsson, A. C., Ruge, T., Kjøller, E., Hilden, J., Kolmos, H. J., Sajadieh, A., . . . Ärnlöv, J. (2018). 10-Year Associations between Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors 1 and 2 and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease: A CLARICOR (Effect of Clarithromycin on Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease) Trial Substudy.. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, 7(9), Article ID e008299.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>10-Year Associations between Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors 1 and 2 and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease: A CLARICOR (Effect of Clarithromycin on Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease) Trial Substudy.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 9, article id e008299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the associations and predictive powers between the soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (TNFR1 and TNFR2) and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

METHODS AND RESULTS: CLARICOR (Effect of Clarithromycin on Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease) is a randomized clinical trial comparing clarithromycin with placebo in patients with stable coronary heart disease. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina pectoris, cerebrovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Patients were followed up for 10 years; discovery sample, those assigned placebo (1204 events in n=1998); and replication sample, those assigned clarithromycin (1220 events in n=1979). We used Cox regression adjusted for C-reactive protein level, established cardiovascular risk factors, kidney function, and cardiovascular drugs. After adjustments, higher serum levels of TNFR1 and TNFR2 were associated with the composite outcome in the discovery sample (hazard ratio per SD increase, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.22; P=0.001 for TNFR1; hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.24; P<0.001 for TNFR2). The associations were similar in the replication sample. The associations with the composite outcome were mainly driven by acute myocardial infarction, cardiovascular mortality, and noncardiovascular mortality. The addition of TNFR1 and TNFR2 to established cardiovascular risk factors improved prediction only modestly (<1%).

CONCLUSIONS: Increased concentrations of circulating TNFR1 and TNFR2 were associated with increased risks of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. Yet, the utility of measuring TNFR1 and TNFR2 to improve risk prediction in these patients appears limited.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00121550.

Keywords
cohort study, coronary atherosclerosis, tumor necrosis factor‐α
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349365 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.117.008299 (DOI)000432332800014 ()29686027 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilMarianne and Marcus Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved
Wallen, E. F., Ljunggren, G., Carlsson, A. C., Pettersson, D. & Wändell, P. (2018). High prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity among persons with a recorded diagnosis of intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 62(4), 269-280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity among persons with a recorded diagnosis of intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 269-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Obesity and lack of physical activity are frequently reported in persons with intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We hypothesised a higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in this population.

Method: We used administrative data for all primary and specialist outpatient and inpatient healthcare consultations for people with at least one recorded diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, hypertension or obesity from 1998 to 2015. Data were drawn from the central administrative database for Stockholm County, Sweden. It was not possible to separate data for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We stratified 26988 individuals with IDs or ASD into three groups, with Down syndrome treated separately, and compared these groups with 1996140 people from the general population.

Results: Compared with the general population, men and women with ID/ASD had 1.6-3.4-fold higher age-adjusted odds of having a registered diagnosis of obesity or diabetes mellitus, with the exception of diabetes among men with Down syndrome. A registered diagnosis of hypertension was only more common among men with ID/ASD than in the general population.

Conclusions: Diabetes and blood pressure health screening, along with efforts to prevent development of obesity already in childhood, are necessary for individuals with IDs and ASD. We believe that there is a need for adapted community-based health promotion programmes to ensure more equitable health for these populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
autism spectrum disorder, diabetes mellitus, down syndrome, hypertension, intellectual disability, prevalence studies
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350734 (URN)10.1111/jir.12462 (DOI)000427123900001 ()29280230 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, A. C., Jansson, J.-H., Söderberg, S., Ruge, T., Larsson, A. & Ärnlöv, J. (2018). Levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2, gender, and risk of myocardial infarction in Northern Sweden. Atherosclerosis, 272, 41-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2, gender, and risk of myocardial infarction in Northern Sweden
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2018 (English)In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 272, p. 41-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor alpha (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, and some evidence points towards a difference in associated risk between men and women. We aimed to study the association between sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and incident myocardial infarctions (MI) and to explore the influence of established cardiovascular risk factors in men and women.

METHODS:

We conducted a nested case control study in three large Swedish cohorts, including 533 myocardial infarction cases, and 1003 age-, sex- and cohort-matched controls. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

RESULTS:

An association between circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and an increased risk for MI was found when comparing cases and controls. The odds ratios were significant after adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors and C-reactive protein in women (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.08-1.93 for TNFR1, and 1.61, 95% CI 1.11-2.34 for TNFR2), but was abolished in men. Women with a combination of elevated CRP and values in the upper quartile of TNFR1 or TNFR2 had a 5-fold higher risk of myocardial infarction versus those with normal CRP and values in the lower three quartiles of TNFR1 or TNFR2.

CONCLUSIONS:

As the risk estimates for TNFR1 and TNFR2 were higher and remained significant after adjustments for established cardiovascular risk factors in women but not in men, a potential role for TNFR1 and TNFR2 in identifying women with a higher MI risk is possible. The future clinical role of TNFR1 and TNFR2 in combination with CRP to identify high risk patients for coronary heart disease has yet to be determined.

Keywords
All-cause mortality, CRP, Community based cohort, Cytokines, Inflammation, Oxidative stress, Tumor necrosis factor
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349227 (URN)10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2018.03.020 (DOI)000430383800007 ()29547707 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung FoundationMarianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Wändell, P., Carlsson, A. C., Holzmann, M. J., Ärnlöv, J., Sundquist, J. & Sundquist, K. (2018). Mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation and common co-morbidities - a cohort study in primary care. Annals of Medicine, 50(2), 156-163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation and common co-morbidities - a cohort study in primary care
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2018 (English)In: Annals of Medicine, ISSN 0785-3890, E-ISSN 1365-2060, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To study the association between cardiovascular co-morbidities and mortality risk in primary care patients with atrial fibrillation.

Methods: The study population included all adults (n=12,283) >= 45 years diagnosed with AF at 75 primary care centres in Sweden between 2001 and 2007. The outcome was mortality (until 2010) and data were explored for co-morbidities using Cox regression with hazard ratios (HRs). Analyses were performed stratified by sex and by age-group (45-64, 65-74 and >= 75 years of age) with adjustment for age, socio-economic factors and relevant co-morbidities.

Results: During a mean of 5.8 years (standard deviation 2.4) of follow-up, 3954 (32%) patients died (1971 (35%) women, and 1983 (30%) men). High HRs were found for congestive heart disease (CHF) and cerebrovascular diseases for all age-groups among men and women (except for the 45-64 year old women); for coronary heart disease among the oldest men; for diabetes among the 65-74 year old men and the 45-64 year old women. Low HRs were found for hypertension among women >= 75 years of age.

Conclusions: In this clinical setting, CHF and cerebrovascular diseases were consistently associated with mortality in all age-groups. The possible protective effect by hypertension among elderly women should be interpreted with caution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, depression, congestive heart failure, gender, hypertension, diabetes
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347261 (URN)10.1080/07853890.2017.1407036 (DOI)000424417900007 ()29172794 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Wandell, P., Carlsson, A. C., Holzmann, M., Ärnlöv, J., Johansson, S.-E., Sundquist, J. & Sundquist, K. (2017). Association between antithrombotic treatment and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation-a cohort study in primary care. European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 73(2), 215-221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between antithrombotic treatment and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation-a cohort study in primary care
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 215-221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to study the association between antithrombotic treatment and risk of hemorrhagic stroke (HS) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) treated in primary health care. Study population included all adults (n = 12,215) 45 years and older diagnosed with AF at 75 primary care centers in Sweden 2001-2007. Outcome was defined as a first hospital episode with a discharge episode of HS after the AF diagnosis. Association between HS and persistent treatment with antithrombotic agents (warfarin, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel) was explored using Cox regression analysis, with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % CIs. Adjustment was made for age, socioeconomic status, and co-morbid cardiovascular conditions. During a mean of 5.8 years (SD 2.4) of follow-up, 162 patients (1.3 %; 67 women and 95 men) with HS were recorded. The adjusted risk associated with persistent warfarin treatment compared to no antithrombotic treatment consistently showed no increased HS risk, HR for women 0.53 (95 % CI 0.23-1.27) and for men 0.55 (95 % CI 0.29-1.04); corresponding HRs for ASA were, for women, 0.45 (95 % CI 0.14-1.44) and, for men, 0.56 (95 % CI 0.24-1.29). In this clinical setting, we found no evidence pointing to an increased risk of HS with antithrombotic treatment.

Keywords
Atrial fibrillation, Hemorrhagic stroke, Gender, Cardiovascular co-morbidity, Anticoagulants, Mortality
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316015 (URN)10.1007/s00228-016-2152-8 (DOI)000392308200010 ()27826643 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2012-70X-15428-08-3
Available from: 2017-02-24 Created: 2017-02-24 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Wandell, P., Carlsson, A. C., Li, X., Gasevic, D., Arnlov, J., Holzmann, M. J., . . . Sundquist, K. (2017). Atrial fibrillation in immigrant groups: a cohort study of all adults 45 years of age and older in Sweden. European Journal of Epidemiology, 32(9), 785-796
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atrial fibrillation in immigrant groups: a cohort study of all adults 45 years of age and older in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 785-796Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To study the association between country of birth and incident atrial fibrillation (AF) in several immigrant groups in Sweden. The study population included all adults (n = 3,226,752) aged 45 years and older in Sweden. AF was defined as having at least one registered diagnosis of AF in the National Patient Register. The incidence of AF in different immigrant groups, using Swedish-born as referents, was assessed by Cox regression, expressed in hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). All models were stratified by sex and adjusted for age, geographical residence in Sweden, educational level, marital status, and neighbourhood socioeconomic status. Compared to their Swedish-born counterparts, higher incidence of AF [HR (95% CI)] was observed among men from Bosnia 1.74 (1.56-1.94) and Latvia 1.29 (1.09-1.54), and among women from Iraq 1.96 (1.67-2.31), Bosnia 1.88 (1.61-1.94), Finland 1.14 (1.11-1.17), Estonia 1.14 (1.05-1.24) and Germany 1.08 (1.03-1.14). Lower incidence of AF was noted among men (HRs > 0.60) from Iceland, Southern Europe (especially Greece, Italy and Spain), Latin America (especially Chile), Africa, Asia (including Iraq, Turkey, Lebanon and Iran), and among women from Nordic countries (except Finland), Southern Europe, Western Europe (except Germany), Africa, North America, Latin America, Iran, Lebanon and other Asian countries (except Turkey and Iraq). In conclusion, we observed substantial differences in incidence of AF between immigrant groups and the Swedish-born population. A greater awareness of the increased risk of AF development in some immigrant groups may enable for a timely diagnosis, treatment and prevention of its debilitating complications, such as stroke.

Keywords
Atrial fibrillation, Gender, First generatio immigrants, Neighbourhood, Second generation immigrants, Socioeconomic status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340966 (URN)10.1007/s10654-017-0283-6 (DOI)000414156900006 ()28702880 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Steubl, D., Kumar, S. V., Tato, M., Mulay, S. R., Larsson, A., Lind, L., . . . Anders, H.-J. (2017). Circulating cathepsin-S levels correlate with GFR decline and sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels in mice and humans. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 43538.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating cathepsin-S levels correlate with GFR decline and sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels in mice and humans
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 43538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cardiovascular complications determine morbidity/mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesized that progressive CKD drives the release of cathepsin-S (Cat-S), a cysteine protease that promotes endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications. Therefore, Cat-S, soluble tumor-necrosis-factor receptor (sTNFR) 1/2 and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured in a CKD mouse model, a German CKD-cohort (MCKD, n = 421) and two Swedish community-based cohorts (ULSAM, n = 764 and PIVUS, n = 804). Association between Cat-S and sTNFR1/2/GFR was assessed using multivariable linear regression. In the mouse model, Cat-S and sTNFR1/2 concentrations were increased following the progressive decline of GFR, showing a strong correlation between Cat-S and GFR (r = -0.746, p < 0.001) and Cat-S and sTNFR1/sTNFR2 (r = 0.837/0.916, p < 0.001, respectively). In the human cohorts, an increase of one standard deviation of estimated GFR was associated with a decrease of 1.008 ng/ml (95%-confidence interval (95%-CI) -1.576-(-0.439), p < 0.001) in Cat-S levels in MCKD; in ULSAM and PIVUS, results were similar. In all three cohorts, Cat-S and sTNFR1/sTNFR2 levels were associated in multivariable linear regression (p < 0.001). In conclusion, as GFR declines Cat-S and markers of inflammation-related endothelial dysfunction increase. The present data indicating that Cat-S activity increases with CKD progression suggest that Cat-S might be a therapeutic target to prevent cardiovascular complications in CKD.

National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316474 (URN)10.1038/srep43538 (DOI)000394936800001 ()28240259 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 668036, 634869Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung FoundationMarianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Wändell, P., Carlsson, A. C., Holzmann, M. J., Ärnlöv, J., Sundquist, J. & Sundquist, K. (2017). Comparison of Mortality and Nonfatal Cardiovascular Events in Adults With Atrial Fibrillation With Versus Without Levothyroxine Treatment. American Journal of Cardiology, 120(11), 1974-1979
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Mortality and Nonfatal Cardiovascular Events in Adults With Atrial Fibrillation With Versus Without Levothyroxine Treatment
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 120, no 11, p. 1974-1979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Levothyroxine has been suggested to be cardiotoxic, but previous studies on the risk of cardiovascular events associated with levothyroxine treatment have been inconclusive. We aimed to study the association between levothyroxine treatment and all-cause mortality as well as cardiovascular events. Study population included all adults (n = 12,283) >= 45 years diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AF) at 75 primary care centers in Sweden in 2001 to 2007, with (n = 1,189; 283 men and 906 women) or without (n = 11,094) levothyroxine treatment. Outcome was defined as all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events, that is, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and congestive heart failure until December 31, 2010. During a mean 5.8 years (standard deviation 2.4 years) of follow-up, a total of 3,954 patients died (32.2%), among whom 92 men (32.5%) and 266 women (29.4%) were treated with levothyroxine. In fully adjusted Cox regression models (age, co-morbidity, socioeconomic factors, and warfarin treatment), a significant association between levothyroxine treatment and lower mortality was found among women (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.91), but not among men (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.69 to 1.10). In the secondary analysis, levothyroxine treatment was not associated with the risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or congestive heart failure (p > 0.05). In conclusion, in a large representative cohort, we found that levothyroxine treatment decreased the mortality risk in women with AF, which suggests that such treatment could be of benefit in this setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EXCERPTA MEDICA INC-ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2017
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340272 (URN)10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.08.013 (DOI)000417889000011 ()28941600 (PubMedID)
Funder
Region Skåne, 88009Swedish Research Council, K2012-70X-15428-08-3Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Rajan, G., Ljunggren, G., Wändell, P., Wahlström, L., Svedin, C.-G. & Carlsson, A. C. (2017). Diagnoses of sexual abuse and their common registered comorbidities in the total population of Stockholm. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 71(6), 592-598
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnoses of sexual abuse and their common registered comorbidities in the total population of Stockholm
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 592-598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Prior research based on self-reports has proven sexual abuse to be a risk factor for pain and psychiatric disorders. However, less is known about how this is reflected within the healthcare system. The aim of this study was to study the 2-year prevalence of diagnosis of sexual abuse and concomitant conditions.

Methods: Using data from VAL, the study population included all living persons in Stockholm County, Sweden, between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2014 (N=2 549 496). Diagnoses of sexual abuse were identified during 2013-2014, with information on the concomitant conditions somatic pain, depression, anxiety, psychotic disorders and bipolar disorders, stress disorders and alcohol and substance abuse. All diagnoses were prospectively registered. Age and neighbourhood socioeconomic status-adjusted ORs with 95% CIs for individuals with a diagnosis of sexual abuse, using individuals without sexual abuse as referents, were calculated.

Results: Girls at the ages 13-17 years had the highest 2-year prevalence (0.69%) of sexual abuse followed by girls 5-12 years (0.11%), and girls 0-4 years (0.04%). For women 45 years and older the 2-year prevalence rates were substantially lower (0.008-0.004%). The highest 2-year prevalence of sexual abuse in men was seen in boys 5-12 (0.03%) years. The total 2-year prevalence of diagnoses of sexual abuse among the population in the material was 0.04%. The highest ORs of comorbidities for girls (ages 017 years) with sexual abuse versus those without sexual abuse were: Stress disorder; 15.7 (13.1 to 18.9), drug abuse; 10.0 (7.7 to 13.0), and alcohol abuse; 9.7(7.8 to 12.0). For boys (ages 0-17 years), the highest ORs of comorbidities were: Stress disorder 12.4 (6.0 to 25.7), anxiety disorders; 5.5 (2.6 to 11.5), and alcohol abuse; 3.9 (1.4 to 11.3). The highest ORs of comorbidities for women (18-) with sexual abuse versus those without sexual abuse were: alcohol abuse; 19.3 (12.6 to 29.6), drug abuse; 16.7 (10.7 to 26.1) and psychotic disorders; 15.3 (8.0 to 29.4). For men (18-) the highest ORs of comorbidities were: alcohol abuse; 25.8 (15.2 to 43.9), anxiety disorders; 14.3 (8.5 to 24.2) stress disorder; 12.9 (7.5 to 22.1) and drug abuse; 12.9 (6.9 to 24.1).

Conclusions: Diagnoses of drug and alcohol abuse, psychotic, bipolar, stress anxiety disorders, depression and somatic pain are more common among individuals with a diagnosis of sexual abuse than among individuals without a diagnosis of sexual abuse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327457 (URN)10.1136/jech-2016-208105 (DOI)000403112200010 ()28077602 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-11 Created: 2017-08-11 Last updated: 2017-08-11Bibliographically approved
Ruge, T., Carlsson, A. C., Larsson, A. & Ärnlöv, J. (2017). Endostatin: a promising biomarker in the cardiovascular continuum?. Biomarkers in Medicine, 11(10), 905-916
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Endostatin: a promising biomarker in the cardiovascular continuum?
2017 (English)In: Biomarkers in Medicine, ISSN 1752-0363, E-ISSN 1752-0371, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 905-916Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current review article aims to provide an up-to-date summary of previous studies in humans that have reported the association between circulating endostatin levels and different cardiovascular phenotypes. We also aim to provide suggestions for future directions of future research evaluating endostatin as a clinically relevant cardiovascular biomarker. With a few exceptions, higher circulating levels of endostatin seem to reflect vascular and myocardial damage, and a worsened prognosis for cardiovascular events or mortality in individuals with hypertension, diabetes, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, as well as in the general population. Circulating endostatin seems to be a promising biomarker for cardiovascular pathology, but there is not enough evidence to date to support the use of endostatin measurements in clinical practice.

Keywords
angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, biomarker, chronic kidney disease, collagen XVIII, epidemiological studies, extracellular matrix, glomerular filtration rate, heart failure, mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330937 (URN)10.2217/bmm-2017-0025 (DOI)000416422600009 ()28976780 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung FoundationEU, Horizon 2020, 634869Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-10-07 Created: 2017-10-07 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
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