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Toft, T., Alfonsson, S., Hovén, E. & Carlsson, T. (2019). Feeling excluded and not having anyone to talk to: Qualitative study of interpersonal relationships following a cancer diagnosis in a sibling. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 42, 76-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeling excluded and not having anyone to talk to: Qualitative study of interpersonal relationships following a cancer diagnosis in a sibling
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 42, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To explore experiences related to interpersonal relationships following a cancer diagnosis in a sibling.

Methods: Respondents (n = 7 females) were recruited by means of convenience sampling during a camp for children affected by childhood cancer and their siblings. Data from children and adolescents with a sibling diagnosed with cancer was collected through individual face-to-face interviews and analyzed using systematic text condensation.

Results: Two categories portrayed the experiences related to interpersonal relationships following a cancer diagnosis in a sibling. Feeling excluded while wanting to maintain a relationship with their ill sibling and be involved in the care portrayed that trying to be involved in the care of their ill sibling was a stressful and difficult experience, since they were simultaneously expected to also manage household chores and attend school. Feeling stigmatized and exposed in social contexts while needing an allowing space to talk about their experiences portrayed the emotional difficulties evoked by social situations and behaviors of others, which left respondents feeling exposed and mistreated. Having the possibility to talk about their experiences and receiving social support was described as essential in order to cope with the situation.

Conclusions: Health professionals need to take into consideration the emotional difficulties and vulnerable situation that children and adolescents who have a sibling diagnosed with cancer are at risk of experiencing. Stigmatization and social exposure present a risk of psychological distress. Having an allowing space to communicate feelings and experiences is desired. Interventions may be necessary to help these individuals psychologically cope.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
Keywords
Interpersonal relations, Life change events, Pediatric cancer, Siblings, Sibling relations
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397779 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2019.07.010 (DOI)000494886500011 ()31450042 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-26 Created: 2019-11-26 Last updated: 2019-11-26Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, T., Kukkola, L., Ljungman, L., Hovén, E. & von Essen, L. (2019). Psychological distress in parents of children treated for cancer: An explorative study. PLoS ONE, 14(6), Article ID e0218860.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological distress in parents of children treated for cancer: An explorative study
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0218860Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective To explore psychological distress experienced by parents who express a need for psychotherapy after curative treatment for their child's cancer. Methods 15 parents (eight mothers and seven fathers) of children treated for cancer (median time since end of curative treatment: two years) were recruited via a pediatric oncology center. Each parent was interviewed twice and data was analyzed with inductive latent qualitative content analysis. Results Two overarching themes emerged. One theme, An unfamiliar and frightening situation during treatment, portrayed experiences during the treatment period, and included the sub-themes Initial reactions to the uncontrollable situation, Adjustment to the situation, and Focus on supporting the child. Another theme, Emotional struggles after end of curative treatment, portrayed experiences following curative treatment, and included the sub-themes Transitioning back to life as it was before the diagnosis, Emotional scars, Uncontrollable fears and worries of diseases, and New perspectives on life. Conclusions Parents of children with cancer experience existential, physical, psychological, and social struggles. They describe an unstable situation after diagnosis and having focused their attention towards protecting their child during treatment. After the end of curative treatment, they experience challenges with transitioning back to life as it was before the diagnosis and dealing with their own emotional scars and fears related to the child's cancer. The findings indicate an unmet need for psychological support among parents of children treated for cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Psychology Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390743 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0218860 (DOI)31226159 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2015-99X-20836-08-4Swedish Cancer Society, 140790
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Ander, M., Thorsell Cederberg, J., von Essen, L. & Hovén, E. (2018). Exploration of psychological distress experienced by survivors of adolescent cancer reporting a need for psychological support. PLoS ONE, 13(4), Article ID e0195899.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploration of psychological distress experienced by survivors of adolescent cancer reporting a need for psychological support
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195899Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

In this qualitative study, we aimed to provide an in-depth exploration of cancer-related psychological distress experienced by young survivors of cancer during adolescence reporting a need for psychological support.

Methods

Two individual interviews were held with ten young survivors of cancer diagnosed in adolescence. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis followed the guidelines for inductive qualitative manifest content analysis.

Results

The survivors described distress experienced during and after the end of treatment. Five categories comprising 14 subcategories were generated. The categories included: A tough treatment, Marked and hindered, Not feeling good enough, Struggling with the fragility of life, and finally, An ongoing battle with emotions.

Conclusion

Young survivors of adolescent cancer reporting a need for psychological support described feeling physically, socially, and mentally marked by the cancer experience. They struggled with powerlessness, insecurity, social disconnection, loneliness, and feelings of being unimportant and a failure, and had difficulties understanding and managing their experiences. These concerns should be addressed in psychological treatments for the population irrespective of which approach or model is used to understand survivors’ difficulties. A transdiagnostic approach targeting processes that underpin different manifestations of distress may be effective.

Keywords
adolescence, cancer, psychological distress, psychological treatment, survivorship, qualitative methods
National Category
Psychology Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Medical Science; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330127 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0195899 (DOI)000430262300041 ()29664926 (PubMedID)
Funder
U‐Care: Better Psychosocial Care at Lower Cost? Evidence-based assessment and Psychosocial Care via Internet, a Swedish ExampleSwedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, 2013-0039; 2016-0004Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Hovén, E., Lannering, B., Gustafsson, G. & Boman, K. K. (2018). Information needs of survivors and families after childhood CNS tumor treatment: a population-based study. Acta Oncologica, 57(5), 649-657
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information needs of survivors and families after childhood CNS tumor treatment: a population-based study
2018 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 649-657Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study examines information needs and satisfaction with provided informationamong childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumor survivors and their parents.Material and methods: In a population-based sample of 697 adult survivors in Sweden, 518 survivorsand 551 parents provided data. Information needs and satisfaction with information were studied usinga multi-dimensional standardized questionnaire addressing information-related issues.Results: Overall, 52% of the survivors and 48% of the parents reported no, or only minor, satisfactionwith the extent of provided information, and 51% of the survivors expressed a need for more informationthan provided. The information received was found useful (to some extent/very much) by 53%,while 47% did not find it useful, or to a minor degree only. Obtaining written material was associatedwith greater satisfaction and usefulness of information. Dissatisfaction with information was associatedwith longer time since diagnosis, poorer current health status and female sex. The survivors experiencedunmet information needs vis-a-vis late effects, illness education, rehabilitation and psychologicalservices. Overall, parents were more dissatisfied than the survivors.Conclusion: These findings have implications for improvements in information delivery. Information inchildhood CNS tumor care and follow-up should specifically address issues where insufficiency wasidentified, and recognize persistent and with time changing needs at the successive stages of longtermsurvivorship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Childhood cancer; CNS tumours; adult survivors; very long-term survivors; parents; information provision; clinical follow-up; long-term surveillance
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335311 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2017.1406136 (DOI)000430114000012 ()29191069 (PubMedID)
Projects
The Swedish childhood CNS tumor LIFE study
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation
Note

The study was funded also by: Jane and Dan Olsson Foundation for Science, Sweden.

Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Wikman, A., Mattsson, E., von Essen, L. & Hovén, E. (2018). Prevalence and predictors of symptoms of anxiety and depression, and comorbid symptoms of distress in parents of childhood cancer survivors and bereaved parents five years after end of treatment or a child's death. Acta Oncologica, 57(7), 950-957
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and predictors of symptoms of anxiety and depression, and comorbid symptoms of distress in parents of childhood cancer survivors and bereaved parents five years after end of treatment or a child's death
2018 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 950-957Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Symptoms of anxiety and depression and their comorbidity in parents of children diagnosed with cancer, particularly later in the cancer trajectory, need further study. The aim was to investigate the prevalence and predictors of symptoms of anxiety and depression in parents of childhood cancer survivors and bereaved parents, five years after end of treatment or a child's death and to investigate comorbidity between symptoms of anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Participants were 132 parents (68 mothers, 64 fathers) of survivors and 37 bereaved parents (20 mothers, 17 fathers). Chi-square test and t-test were used to explore differences in symptoms of anxiety and depression. Comorbidity was explored using Pearson's correlations and Chi-square test. Multivariable hierarchical linear regressions were used to identify predictors of symptoms of anxiety and depression.

RESULTS:

In parents of survivors, 20% reported anxiety and 14% reported depression. Corresponding figures among bereaved parents were 30% and 35%. Among parents of survivors reporting clinically relevant anxiety and depression, a larger proportion were mothers than fathers. No such difference was found among bereaved parents. Symptoms of anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress were highly correlated (all r ≥ 0.65, p < .001). Comorbid symptoms were reported by 7-11% of parents of survivors and 14-24% of bereaved parents. In multivariable analyses, more severe symptoms of depression were associated with anxiety, posttraumatic stress and distress related to previous stressful life events. Being a mother, symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress were associated with more severe symptoms of anxiety.

CONCLUSION:

A subset of parents report clinically elevated symptoms of anxiety and depression, comorbid anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress. Experiencing distress related to previous stressful life events as well as concurrent comorbidity were associated with more severe psychological distress at five years after end of treatment/a child's death. These results deserve further attention in research and clinical care.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347343 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2018.1445286 (DOI)000441790600010 ()29498559 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2008-70X-20836-01-3Swedish Research Council, K2011-70X-20836-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2015-99X-20836-08-4Swedish Cancer Society, 2007/1015Swedish Cancer Society, 2010/726Swedish Cancer Society, 2013/580Swedish Cancer Society, 2014/613Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PROJ08/010
Available from: 2018-03-29 Created: 2018-03-29 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Grönqvist, H., Olsson, E., Johansson, B., Held, C., Sjöström, J., Lindahl Norberg, A., . . . von Essen, L. (2017). Fifteen Challenges in Establishing a Multidisciplinary Research Program on eHealth Research in a University Setting: A Case Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(5), Article ID e173.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fifteen Challenges in Establishing a Multidisciplinary Research Program on eHealth Research in a University Setting: A Case Study
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 19, no 5, article id e173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

U-CARE is a multidisciplinary eHealth research program that involves the disciplines of caring science, clinical psychology, health economics, information systems, and medical science. It was set up from scratch in a university setting in 2010, funded by a governmental initiative. While establishing the research program, many challenges were faced. Systematic documentation of experiences from establishing new research environments is scarce.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this paper was to describe the challenges of establishing a publicly funded multidisciplinary eHealth research environment.

METHODS:

Researchers involved in developing the research program U-CARE identified challenges in the formal documentation and by reflecting on their experience of developing the program. The authors discussed the content and organization of challenges into themes until consensus was reached.

RESULTS:

The authors identified 15 major challenges, some general to establishing a new research environment and some specific for multidisciplinary eHealth programs. The challenges were organized into 6 themes: Organization, Communication, Implementation, Legislation, Software development, and Multidisciplinarity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Several challenges were faced during the development of the program and several accomplishments were made. By sharing our experience, we hope to help other research groups embarking on a similar journey to be prepared for some of the challenges they are likely to face on their way.

Keywords
eHealth, interdisciplinary studies, organization, administration
National Category
Psychology Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323577 (URN)10.2196/jmir.7310 (DOI)000417014900001 ()28536090 (PubMedID)
Note

De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Hovén, E., Grönqvist, H., Pöder, U., von Essen, L. & Lindahl Norberg, A. (2017). Impact of a child’s cancer disease on parents’ everyday life: A longitudinal study from Sweden. Acta Oncologica, 56(1), 93-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of a child’s cancer disease on parents’ everyday life: A longitudinal study from Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A child's cancer disease may disrupt the daily life of the affected family for a long period. The aim was to describe restrictions on parents' leisure activities and work/studies during and after the child's treatment. Methods: This study used data from a cohort of mothers and fathers (n = 246) of children diagnosed with cancer. Data was collected five times from two months after diagnosis to one year after end of treatment. Reports of restrictions were evaluated over time, between mothers and fathers, and in relation to parent-reported child symptom burden (The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale) and partial post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (The PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version). Results: Two (51%) and four (45%) months after diagnosis, about half reported that their leisure activities were restricted at least some of the time. Corresponding percentages for restrictions on work/ studies were 84% and 77%. One year after end of treatment, the great majority reported that their leisure activities (91%) and/or work/studies (76%) were never/seldom restricted. During treatment, more mothers than fathers reported restrictions on work/studies all/most of the time. After end of treatment, gender was only related to reports of restrictions among parents not reporting partial PTSD. More parents who reported being restricted all/most of the time also reported partial PTSD and/or a greater symptom burden for the child. Conclusion: Parents report frequent restrictions on everyday life during treatment. One year after end of treatment, parents report only a limited impact of the child's cancer on their leisure activities and work/studies. More parents who report restrictions also report partial PTSD and/or a greater child symptom burden. The effect of gender on restrictions varies depending on reports of partial PTSD. Future studies of gender differences regarding the impact of a child's cancer on parents' everyday life should thus consider mothers' and fathers' level of psychological distress.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-306725 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2016.1250945 (DOI)000392819600015 ()27834555 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PROJ08/010Swedish Research Council, K2008-70X-20836-01-3 K2011-70X-20836-04-4 K2015-99X-20836-08-4Swedish Cancer Society, 2007/1015 2010/726
Available from: 2016-11-03 Created: 2016-11-03 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Kukkola, L., Hovén, E., Cernvall, M., von Essen, L. & Grönqvist, H. (2017). Perceptions of support among Swedish parents of children after end of successful cancer treatment: A prospective, longitudinal study. Acta Oncologica, 56(12), 1705-1711
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of support among Swedish parents of children after end of successful cancer treatment: A prospective, longitudinal study
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2017 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1705-1711Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Most children survive childhood cancer, however parenting a child diagnosed with cancer is a major challenge. The main aim of the current study was to describe Swedish parents’ need, opportunity and benefit of support from healthcare professionals and significant others after end of a child’s successful cancer treatment.

Material and methods: Data was collected from approximately one week after end of successful treatment/six months after transplantation (T4, n ¼ 212) up to five years thereafter (T7, n ¼ 137). Parents answered questions via telephone about need, opportunity and benefit of talking to psychologists, social workers, partners and friends.

Results: The proportion reporting need of support from healthcare professionals varied between 73% (mothers’ need of support from social workers, T4) and 7% (fathers’ need of support from psychologists/social workers, T7). Need of support from significant others varied between 99% (mothers’ and fathers’ need of support from partners, T4) and 27% (fathers’ need of support from friends, T7). The proportion reporting need of support decreased over time (p < .001), no decrease occurred from three months after end of treatment/nine months after transplantation (T5) to one year after end of treatment/18 months after transplantation (T6). More mothers than fathers reported need of support from friends at T5 (p < .001) and T7 (p < .05) and from psychologists at T7 (p < .05). Opportunities for support from healthcare professionals varied, most reported opportunity for support from significant others. Almost all reported benefit from received support.

Conclusion: A declining number reports a need of support over time, however subgroups report an unmet need and almost every parent perceive support from healthcare professionals as beneficial. More parents should get access to psychosocial support services after end of a child’s cancer treatment/transplantation.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330769 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2017.1374554 (DOI)000418118800006 ()28971717 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2008-70X-20836-01-3; K2011-70X-20836-04-4; K2015-99X-20836-08-4Swedish Cancer Society, 2007/1015; 2010/726; 2014/613Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PROJ08/010U‐Care: Better Psychosocial Care at Lower Cost? Evidence-based assessment and Psychosocial Care via Internet, a Swedish Example, 2009-1093
Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-22Bibliographically approved
Ljungman, L., Boger, M., Ander, M., Ljótsson, B., Cernvall, M., von Essen, L. & Hovén, E. (2016). Impressions that last: Particularly negative and positive experiences reported by parents five years after the end of a child's successful cancer treatment or death. PLoS ONE, 11(6), Article ID e0157076.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impressions that last: Particularly negative and positive experiences reported by parents five years after the end of a child's successful cancer treatment or death
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0157076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To describe the experience of parenting a child diagnosed with cancer by examining particularly negative and positive experiences reported by parents of childhood cancer survivors and parents of children lost to cancer.

METHODS: 168 parents (88 mothers, 80 fathers) participated. Data were collected five years after the end of successful treatment or the child's death. The parents' experiences were identified by open-ended semi-structured questions about particularly negative and positive experiences of the child's cancer. An inductive approach was used in which the manifest verbal content of the answers was analysed using content analysis.

RESULTS: The analysis revealed eight categories of negative experience (child late effects; distressing events; healthcare; impaired relationships; long-term psychological consequences; own reactions; surrounding institutions; the fact that the child got cancer) and seven categories of positive experience (healthcare; improved relationships; long-term consequences for the child; personal development; support systems; treatment outcome; unexpected joy). The categories were related to past events or to the present situation. The findings indicate variations in experiences between parents of survivors and bereaved parents, and between fathers and mothers, as some experiences were only reported by parents of survivors and some experiences were only reported by mothers.

CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight the importance of past and present events to parents, and accordingly the long-lasting impact of paediatric cancer on parents. The results also point to the wide range of negative as well as positive experiences involved in parenting a child diagnosed with cancer, and provide a comprehensive understanding of the overall experience for parents of children with cancer. Specifically, the findings give guidance to healthcare providers by illustrating the need to provide healthcare personnel with continuous training in communication skills, offering parents opportunities to meet other parents in the same situation and increasing the access to psychosocial supportive services and psychological care.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-296022 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0157076 (DOI)000377561000061 ()27272318 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2008-70X-20836-01- 3 K2011-70X-20836-04-4Swedish Cancer Society, 2007/1015 2010/726Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PROJ08/010
Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Wikman, A., Hovén, E., Cernvall, M., Ljungman, G., Ljungman, L. & von Essen, L. (2016). Parents of children diagnosed with cancer: work situation and sick leave, a five-year post end-of-treatment or a child's death follow-up study. Acta Oncologica, 55(9-10), 1152-1157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents of children diagnosed with cancer: work situation and sick leave, a five-year post end-of-treatment or a child's death follow-up study
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2016 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 9-10, p. 1152-1157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cancer in a child is associated with a significant impact on parental employment. We assessed the proportions of parents of survivors and bereaved parents working and reporting sick leave five years after end of successful treatment (ST)/child's death (T7) compared with one year after end of ST/child's death (T6) and the association between partial post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and work situation and sick leave at T7.

Participants and procedure: The sample included 152 parents of survivors (77 mothers, 75 fathers) and 42 bereaved parents (22 mothers, 20 fathers) of children diagnosed with cancer in Sweden.

Results: The proportions of parents working or reporting sick leave did not differ among mothers and fathers of survivors (92% vs. 96% working, 20% vs. 18% on sick leave) or among bereaved mothers and fathers (91% vs. 90% working, 14% vs. 20% on sick leave) at T7. There was no change from T6 to T7 in the proportion of fathers working (fathers of survivors 91% vs. 96%, bereaved fathers 95% vs. 90%). Although more mothers of survivors (92% vs. 82%) and bereaved mothers (91% vs. 77%) worked at T7 than at T6, this increase was not significant. Fewer bereaved mothers reported sick leave at T7 than at T6 (14% vs. 59%, p<0.05). Although more fathers reported sick leave at T7 than at T6 (fathers of survivors 18% vs. 8%, bereaved fathers 20% vs. 15%), this was not significant. Partial PTSD was not associated with parents' work situation or sick leave at T7.

Conclusion: Results suggest little adverse effect on work situation and sick leave among parents of survivors and bereaved parents five years after end of ST/child's death from cancer. However, the pattern of change observed differed between parents, which could potentially indicate possible delayed consequences for fathers not captured in the present paper.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280459 (URN)10.3109/0284186X.2016.1167956 (DOI)000385554200014 ()27159219 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 01 6368, 02 0274, 03 0228Swedish Research Council, K2008-70X-20836-01-3Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, 02/004, 05/030
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9335-9714

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