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Kubai, Anne
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Ahlberg, B. M., Maina, F., Kubai, A., Khamasi, W., Ekman, M. & Lundqvist-Persson, C. (2016). ‘"A child, a tree": Challenges in building collaborative relations in a community research project in a Kenyan context. Action Research, 14(3), 257-275
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘"A child, a tree": Challenges in building collaborative relations in a community research project in a Kenyan context
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2016 (English)In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 257-275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper highlights the potential for basing participatory action research on priorities identified by communities. The case builds on a research project by the Social Science Medicine Africa Network (Soma-net) focusing on AIDS prevention among school youth in Kajiado in Kenya during 2003-2006. It became clear from that study just how complex it is to promote open communication on issues of sexuality considered critical for sexual health promotion. Towards the end of that study a spin-off in the form of a concept a child, a tree or tree planting evolved and the research thereafter continued as a partnership between the school community and the researchers. The focus then was on understanding how health promotion could be integrated into other aspects of community life. The concept and tree planting when implemented created a sense of ownership among the pupils largely because they were placed at the centre of the development activities. The story illuminates the nature of change developing in the course of the project, but also the challenges and complexity of creating and maintaining collaborative relations in the face of cultural and gender power dynamics and interventions imposed from outside the community.

Keyword
Health promotion; collaborative relations; communicative action; community initiative; social innovation; sexuality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264194 (URN)10.1177/1476750315607607 (DOI)000383043200003 ()
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. (2016). 'Confession' and 'Forgiveness' as a strategy for development in post-genocide Rwanda. HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies, 72(4), Article ID UNSP a3562.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Confession' and 'Forgiveness' as a strategy for development in post-genocide Rwanda
2016 (English)In: HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies, ISSN 0259-9422, E-ISSN 2072-8050, Vol. 72, no 4, article id UNSP a3562Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The government of Rwanda has pursued reconciliation with great determination in the belief that it is the only moral alternative to post-genocide social challenges. In Rwanda, communities must be mobilised and reshaped for social, political and economic reconstruction. This creates a rather delicate situation. Among other strategies, the state has turned to the concepts of confession and forgiveness which have deep religious roots, and systematised them both at the individual and community or state level in order to bring about reconciliation, justice, social cohesion and ultimately economic development. In view of these strategies and challenges, some of the important questions are: Does forgiveness restore victims and empower them to heal their communities? What empirical evidence exists that religiously inspired justice and reconciliation processes after mass political violence make a difference? In what areas might the understanding of religious thought and activity towards transitional justice be deepened? These questions provide the backdrop against which I examine the case of post-genocide Rwanda in this article. A hermeneutic interpretative analysis is used to situate the phenomena of forgiveness, confession and social transformation within the specific context of post-conflict societies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AOSIS, 2016
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320949 (URN)10.4102/hts.v72i4.3562 (DOI)000396501100001 ()
Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2017-04-27Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. (2015). Being here and there: Migrant communities in Sweden and the conflicts in the Horn of Africa. In: Fassil Demissie (Ed.), Africans on the Move: Migration, Diaspora and Development Nexus (pp. 76-90). Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being here and there: Migrant communities in Sweden and the conflicts in the Horn of Africa
2015 (English)In: Africans on the Move: Migration, Diaspora and Development Nexus / [ed] Fassil Demissie, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2015, p. 76-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The largest migrant communities in Sweden come from Africa's most troubled region, the Horn. These are the Somali and Ethiop-Eritrean communities. This paper examines the not-so-obvious ways in which Ethiop-Eritrean and Somali communities in Sweden influence the political developments, particularly the conflicts at 'home'. Many of these immigrants living in Sweden keep up with social and political developments in their countries of origin almost on daily basis and remain engaged, to a large extent, in the affairs of both their families and communities 'out there' while they 'are here in Sweden'. This article therefore focuses on the particular forms of engagement that have either intended or unintended impact on the intractable conflicts in which the societies in these countries are engaged. I argue that 'nostalgia underpins the immigrants' sense of commitment to the affairs of their countries of origin, and therefore, providing moral and material support to warring groups derives the impetus largely from the affective dimension of migration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2015
Keyword
Horn of Africa, diaspora, conflict, migration, affective dimension
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310248 (URN)2-s2.0-84978670450 (Scopus ID)9781317539544 (ISBN)9781138846647 (ISBN)
Note

This chapter in book was originally published as an article in a special issue of African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal.

Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2017-01-03Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. (2014). Conducting fieldwork in Rwanda: Listening to silence and processing experiences of genocide. In: Ivana Macek (Ed.), Engaging violence: Trauma, Memory and Representation (pp. 111-126). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conducting fieldwork in Rwanda: Listening to silence and processing experiences of genocide
2014 (English)In: Engaging violence: Trauma, Memory and Representation / [ed] Ivana Macek, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 111-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2014
National Category
Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209060 (URN)2-s2.0-84917481004 (Scopus ID)9780415831697 (ISBN)9780203490778 (ISBN)9781134621606 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-14 Last updated: 2016-12-08Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. (2014). Reinventing ‘tradition’: Social reconstruction and development in post-genocide Rwanda. In: Tomas Sundnes Drønen (Ed.), Religion and Development: Nordic Perspectives on Development in Africa. New York: Peter Lang
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reinventing ‘tradition’: Social reconstruction and development in post-genocide Rwanda
2014 (English)In: Religion and Development: Nordic Perspectives on Development in Africa / [ed] Tomas Sundnes Drønen, New York: Peter Lang , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Peter Lang, 2014
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209063 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-14 Last updated: 2014-09-11
Duh, A., Gaas, M. H., Gasimelseed, A., Gorani, A., Kleist, N., Kubai, A., . . . Tiilikainen, M. (2013). A Horn of Africa in Northern Europe: An Email Conversation (1ed.). In: Michael McEachrane (Ed.), Afro-Nordic Landscapes: Engaging Blackness in Northern Europe. Oxford: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Horn of Africa in Northern Europe: An Email Conversation
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2013 (English)In: Afro-Nordic Landscapes: Engaging Blackness in Northern Europe / [ed] Michael McEachrane, Oxford: Routledge , 2013, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Routledge, 2013 Edition: 1
Keyword
Race, integration, discrimination, Horn, Africa Muslims, Democracy
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Cultural Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191578 (URN)9780415897433 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2013-11-22Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. (2013). Being here and there: Migrant communities in Sweden and the conflicts in the Horn of Africa. African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal, 6(2), 174-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being here and there: Migrant communities in Sweden and the conflicts in the Horn of Africa
2013 (English)In: African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal, ISSN 1752-8631, E-ISSN 1752-864X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 174-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The largest migrant communities in Sweden come from Africa’s most troubled region, the Horn. These are the Somali and Ethiop-Eritrean communities. This paper examines the not-so-obvious ways in which Ethiop-Eritrean and Somali communities in Sweden influence the political developments, particularly the conflicts at ‘home’. Many of these immigrants living in Sweden keep up with social and political developments in their countries of origin almost on daily basis and remain engaged, to a large extent, in the affairs of both their families and communities ‘out there’ while they ‘are here in Sweden’. This article therefore focuses on the particular forms of engagement that have either intended or unintended impact on the intractable conflicts in which the societies in these countries are engaged. I argue that ‘nostalgia underpins the immigrants’ sense of commitment to the affairs of their countries of origin, and therefore, providing moral and material support to warring groups derives the impetus largely from the affective dimension of migration.

Keyword
Horn of Africa, diaspora, conflict, migration, affective dimension
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-208898 (URN)10.1080/17528631.2013.793136 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. (2013). It Was the Work of Satan: Perpetrators rationalize the atrocities of the Rwanda genocide. In: Kjell-Åke Nordqvist (Ed.), Gods and Arms: On Religion and Armed Conflict (pp. 49-68). Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>It Was the Work of Satan: Perpetrators rationalize the atrocities of the Rwanda genocide
2013 (English)In: Gods and Arms: On Religion and Armed Conflict / [ed] Kjell-Åke Nordqvist, Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications, 2013, p. 49-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications, 2013
Series
Church of Sweden Research Series ; Volume 6
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-208901 (URN)978-1-62032-190-4 (ISBN)
Note

Church of Sweden Research Series

CSRS is a peer reviewed research series issued under the auspices of the Church of Sweden Research Unit. The books are published by Pickwick Publications, and presents theological and human right reflections from primarily the Nordic country's (perspectives).

http://www.svenskakyrkan.se/default.aspx?di=869143

Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-10 Last updated: 2013-11-26Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. & Ahlberg, B. M. (2013). Making and unmaking ethnicities in the Rwandan context: implication for gender-based violence, health, and wellbeing of women. Ethnicity and Health, 18(5), 469-482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making and unmaking ethnicities in the Rwandan context: implication for gender-based violence, health, and wellbeing of women
2013 (English)In: Ethnicity and Health, ISSN 1355-7858, E-ISSN 1465-3419, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 469-482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

To examine ethnicity and gender violence in Rwanda from cultural and historical perspectives and explore the encounters between cultural beliefs and practices and the new gender equality policy and programs and the implications of the particular encounters to the health of women.

Design

The study is a qualitative drawing from the growing range of interactive approaches and methods within an ethnographic framework of the research design. Twenty individual interviews, six focus group discussions and two 'community mobilization' dialogs were conducted.

Results

Violence has continued and there is a conflict between cultural tradition, the de-ethnicization, and gender equality policies. Some of the gender violence preventive programs are influenced by the ethos of the traditional norms, and therefore unwittingly perpetuate gender-based violence.

Conclusions

In spite of the progress that Rwanda has made in political empowerment of women, it still seems a long way before real gender equality is achieved. It seems that women's empowerment is not only just an opportunity for political participation but also this is important. It is also about the capacity to make effective choices and to translate them into desired actions and outcomes, unfettered by cultural sanctions. Universalised, top-down gender policy programs have not furnished all women with the necessary capacity to make decisions that affect their traditionally all important reproductive functions; to challenge the embedded gender imbalance; and to strive for a holistic wellbeing of their families, where they play a central role. Indeed, some of the policies could have negative implications to the health of women, in particular, with sexually transmitted infections, including HIV and AIDS.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-208305 (URN)10.1080/13557858.2013.832012 (DOI)000324512400003 ()23998330 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-27 Created: 2013-09-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kubai, A. (2013). 'Singing the Lord’s Song in a Strange Land’: Challenges and New Frontiers for African Churches in Sweden. In: Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu, Andrea Fröchtling, Andreas Kunz-Lübcke (Ed.), Babel is everywhere!: Migration, Religionand Diaspora in Global Perspectives (pp. 251-266). Peter Lang
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Singing the Lord’s Song in a Strange Land’: Challenges and New Frontiers for African Churches in Sweden
2013 (English)In: Babel is everywhere!: Migration, Religionand Diaspora in Global Perspectives / [ed] Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu, Andrea Fröchtling, Andreas Kunz-Lübcke, Peter Lang , 2013, p. 251-266Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Peter Lang, 2013
Series
Studies in the Intercultural History of Christianity ; 157
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209065 (URN)978-3-631-63283-3 (ISBN)978-3-653-03601-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-14 Last updated: 2014-01-13
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