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Abrahamsson, Niclas
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Nilsen, I., Sundbom, M., Abrahamsson, N. & Hänni, A. (2019). Comparison of Meal Pattern and Postprandial Glucose Response in Duodenal Switch and Gastric Bypass Patients. Obesity Surgery, 29(7), 2210-2216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Meal Pattern and Postprandial Glucose Response in Duodenal Switch and Gastric Bypass Patients
2019 (English)In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 2210-2216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bariatric surgery improves glucose homeostasis; however, side effects such as hypoglycemia can occur. We investigated the effects of meals on interstitial glucose (IG) response in biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP)-operated patients at least 1 year after surgery.

Methods: Thirty patients treated with BPD-DS or RYGBP were recruited at the outpatient Obesity Unit, Uppsala University Hospital. IG was measured by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for 3 consecutive days, and postprandial IG levels from 5 to 120 min were analyzed for 2 of these days. All intake of food and beverages was simultaneously registered in a food diary, which was processed using The Meal Pattern Questionnaire.

Results: Postprandial IG levels were significantly lower in BPD-DS (n = 14) compared to RYGBP (n = 15)-treated patients, with mean concentrations of 5.0 (+/- 1.0) and 6.3 (+/- 1.8) mmol/L respectively (p < 0.001). The mean postprandial IG increment was lower in BPD-DS than in RYGBP patients, 0.2 (+/- 0.6) vs. 0.4 (+/- 1.4) mmol/L (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the postprandial IG variability was less pronounced in BPD-DS than in RYGBP patients. The mean number of daily meals did not differ between the two groups, 7.8 (+/- 2.6) in BPD-DS and 7.2 (+/- 1.7) in the RYGBP (p = 0.56).

Conclusion: BPD-DS patients demonstrated lower postprandial IG concentrations, with smaller postprandial IG increments and less pronounced postprandial IG variability compared to RYGBP patients. The two groups had similar meal pattern and the postprandial IG responses is probably associated with differences in postoperative physiology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2019
Keywords
Continuous glucose monitoring, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, Glycemic variability, Meals, Postprandial period
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387721 (URN)10.1007/s11695-019-03826-3 (DOI)000469767700026 ()30919168 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Almby, K. E., Abrahamsson, N., Lundqvist, M. H., Hammar, U., Thombare, K., Panagiotou, A., . . . Eriksson, J. (2019). Effects of GLP-1 on counter-regulatory responses during hypoglycemia after GBP surgery. European Journal of Endocrinology, 181(2), 161-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of GLP-1 on counter-regulatory responses during hypoglycemia after GBP surgery
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 181, no 2, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the role of GLP-1 receptor activation on the counter-regulation and symptoms of hypoglycemia in subjects who have undergone gastric bypass surgery (GBP).

Design: Experimental hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp study.

Methods: Twelve post-GBP subjects participated in a randomized cross-over study with two hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic clamps (glucose nadir 2.7 mmol/L) performed on separate days with concomitant infusions of the GLP-1 analog exenatide or with saline, respectively. Continuous measurements of metabolites and counter-regulatory hormones as well as assessments of heart rate variability and symptoms of hypoglycemia were performed throughout the clamps.

Results: No effect of GLP-1 receptor activation on counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, GH) or glucose infusion rate was seen, but we found indications of a downregulation of the sympathetic relative to the parasympathetic nerve activity, as reflected in heart rate variability. No significant differences in symptom of hypoglycemia were observed.

Conclusions/interpretation: Short-term exposure to a GLP-1 receptor agonist does not seem to impact the counter-regulatory hormonal and metabolic responses in post-GBP subjects during hypoglycemic conditions, suggesting that the improvement in symptomatic hypoglycemia post-GBP seen following treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists may be mediated by mechanism not directly involved in counter-regulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOSCIENTIFICA LTD, 2019
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390513 (URN)10.1530/EJE-19-0171 (DOI)000472835100013 ()31176298 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Diabetes AssociationErnfors FoundationEXODIAB - Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, M. H., Almby, K. E., Abrahamsson, N. & Eriksson, J. (2019). Is the Brain a Key Player in Glucose Regulation and Development of Type 2 Diabetes?. Frontiers in Physiology, 10, Article ID 457.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the Brain a Key Player in Glucose Regulation and Development of Type 2 Diabetes?
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 457Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ever since Claude Bernards discovery in the mid 19th-century that a lesion in the floor of the third ventricle in dogs led to altered systemic glucose levels, a role of the CNS in whole-body glucose regulation has been acknowledged. However, this finding was later overshadowed by the isolation of pancreatic hormones in the 20th century. Since then, the understanding of glucose homeostasis and pathology has primarily evolved around peripheral mechanism. Due to scientific advances over these last few decades, however, increasing attention has been given to the possibility of the brain as a key player in glucose regulation and the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Studies of animals have enabled detailed neuroanatomical mapping of CNS structures involved in glucose regulation and key neuronal circuits and intracellular pathways have been identified. Furthermore, the development of neuroimaging techniques has provided methods to measure changes of activity in specific CNS regions upon diverse metabolic challenges in humans. In this narrative review, we discuss the available evidence on the topic. We conclude that there is much evidence in favor of active CNS involvement in glucose homeostasis but the relative importance of central vs. peripheral mechanisms remains to be elucidated. An increased understanding of this field may lead to new CNS-focusing pharmacologic strategies in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2019
Keywords
CNS, hypothalamus, glucose, regulation, fMRI, neuroimaging, neuroendocrine, autonomic nervous system
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383553 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2019.00457 (DOI)000466111400001 ()
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 721236-TREATMENTSwedish Diabetes AssociationErnfors Foundation
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Abrahamsson, N., Ahlund, L., Ahrin, E. & Alfonsson, S. (2018). Video-based CBT-E improves eating patterns in obese patients with eating disorder: A single case multiple baseline study. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 61, 104-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Video-based CBT-E improves eating patterns in obese patients with eating disorder: A single case multiple baseline study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, ISSN 0005-7916, E-ISSN 1873-7943, Vol. 61, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is effective for treating eating disorders but it may be difficult to reach patients living far from urban centers. Mobile video-based psychotherapy may potentially improve service reach but has not yet been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mobile video-based CBT for eating disorder and to explore the feasibility to use this technology in clinical care.

METHODS:

A controlled single case multiple baseline design was used which allowed for statistical analyses with randomization tests and non-overlap of all pairs (NAP). Five patients in the first stage of eating disorder treatment were included and the main outcome variable was daily meal frequency. Secondary outcome variables included eating disorder symptoms, psychological distress and treatment satisfaction.

RESULTS:

The treatment resulted in a significant (p < .01) increase in daily meal frequency with medium to large effect sizes (combined NAP = .89). Four participants reported reliable improvements in eating disorder symptoms and three reported improvements in mood. The participants reported high satisfaction with the treatment and with the mobile video-application despite some technical problems.

LIMITATIONS:

Self-reported data on eating behavior is prone to be biased and the results of single case studies may have limited generalizability.

CONCLUSION:

CBT can be delivered effectively via a mobile video application and, despite some technological issues, can be well received by patients. All participants in this study had previous low access to mental health services and reported high satisfaction with the treatment format.

Keywords
Cognitive behavioral therapy; Eating disorders; Telemedicine; Video-based psychotherapy
National Category
Psychology Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356514 (URN)10.1016/j.jbtep.2018.06.010 (DOI)000444065700015 ()29990679 (PubMedID)
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved
Webb, D.-L., Abrahamsson, N., Sundbom, M. & Hellström, P. M. (2017). Bariatric surgery - time to replace with GLP-1?. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 52(6-7), 635-640
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bariatric surgery - time to replace with GLP-1?
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 6-7, p. 635-640Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Obesity with a body mass index (BMI) over 30kg/m(2) represents a significant risk for increased morbidity and mortality, with reduced life expectancy of about 10 years. Until now, surgical treatment has been the only effective longterm intervention. The currently standardized method of bariatric surgery, gastric bypass, means that many gastrointestinal peptide hormones are activated, yielding net reductions in appetite and food intake. Among the most important gut peptide hormones in this perspective is glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which rises sharply after gastric bypass. Consistent with outcomes of this surgery, GLP-1 suppresses appetite and reduces food intake. This implies that GLP-1 has the potential to achieve a similar therapeutic outcome as gastric bypass. GLP-1 analogs, which are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, also lead to significant weight loss. Altered hormonal profiles after gastric bypass therefore indicate a logical connection between gut peptide hormone levels, weight loss and glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, combinations of GLP-1 with other gut hormones such as peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) may be able to reinforce GLP-1 driven reduction in appetite and food intake. Pharmacological intenvention in obesity by use of GLP-1 analogs (exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, taspoglutide) and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) degradation that inactivate GLP-1 (sitagliptin, vildagliptin), leading to reduced appetite and weight with positive effects on metabolic control, are realistically achievable. This may be regarded as a low-risk therapeutic alternative to surgery for reducing obesity-related risk factors in the obese with lower BMIs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Gastric bypass, gastric emptying, glucagon-like peptides, glucose homeostasis, weight loss
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328850 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2017.1293154 (DOI)000399808100004 ()28276830 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-01 Created: 2017-09-01 Last updated: 2017-09-01Bibliographically approved
Pereira, M. J., Skrtic, S., Katsogiannos, P., Abrahamsson, N., Kullberg, J., Nowak, C. & Eriksson, J. W. (2017). CDKN2C expression is low in type 2 diabetes and associated with reduced lipid storage capacity in subcutaneous adipose tissue and elevated free fatty acid levels. Paper presented at 53rd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 11-15, 2017, Lisbon, PORTUGAL. Diabetologia, 60(S1), S272-S272, Article ID 598.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CDKN2C expression is low in type 2 diabetes and associated with reduced lipid storage capacity in subcutaneous adipose tissue and elevated free fatty acid levels
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2017 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, no S1, p. S272-S272, article id 598Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347293 (URN)000408315001375 ()
Conference
53rd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 11-15, 2017, Lisbon, PORTUGAL
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Abrahamsson, N., Lau Börjesson, J., Sundbom, M., Wiklund, U., Karlsson, A. & Eriksson, J. W. (2016). Gastric bypass reduces symptoms and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Diabetes, 65(9), 2667-2675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gastric bypass reduces symptoms and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia
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2016 (English)In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 2667-2675Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

Keywords
Gastric bypass, hypoglycemia
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-276380 (URN)10.2337/db16-0341 (DOI)000382099800021 ()27313315 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Diabetes Association
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Pereira, M. J., Skrtic, S., Katsogiannos, P., Abrahamsson, N., Sidibeh, C. O., Dahgam, S., . . . Eriksson, J. W. (2016). Impaired adipose tissue lipid storage, but not altered lipolysis, contributes to elevated levels of free fatty acids in type 2 diabetes. Paper presented at 52nd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 12-16, 2016, Munich, GERMANY. Diabetologia, 59, S323-S323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impaired adipose tissue lipid storage, but not altered lipolysis, contributes to elevated levels of free fatty acids in type 2 diabetes
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2016 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, p. S323-S323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2016
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322051 (URN)000398373702050 ()
Conference
52nd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 12-16, 2016, Munich, GERMANY
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2017-05-16Bibliographically approved
Pereira, M. J., Skrtic, S., Katsogiannos, P., Abrahamsson, N., Sidibeh, C. O., Dahgam, S., . . . Eriksson, J. W. (2016). Impaired adipose tissue lipid storage, but not altered lipolysis, contributes to elevated levels of NEFA in type 2 diabetes. Degree of hyperglycemia and adiposity are important factors. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 65(12), 1768-1780
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impaired adipose tissue lipid storage, but not altered lipolysis, contributes to elevated levels of NEFA in type 2 diabetes. Degree of hyperglycemia and adiposity are important factors
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2016 (English)In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 65, no 12, p. 1768-1780Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Elevated levels of circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) mediate many adverse metabolic effects. In this work we aim to determine the impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D), glycemic control and obesity on lipolysis regulation. Design and Participants. 20 control and 20 metformin-treated T2D subjects were matched for sex (10 M/10 F), age (58 +/- 11 vs 58 +/- 9 y) and BMI (30.8 +/- 4.6 vs 30.7 +/- 4.9 kg/m(2)). In vivo lipolysis was assessed during a 3 h-OGTT with plasma glycerol and NEFA levels. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) biopsies were obtained to measure mRNA and metabolite levels of factors related to lipolysis and lipid storage and to assess in vitro lipolysis in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes. Results. Plasma NEFA AUC during the OGTT where higher 30% (P = 0.005) in T2D than in control subjects, but plasma glycerol AUC and subcutaneous adipocyte lipolysis in vitro were similar, suggesting that adipose tissue lipolysis is not altered. Expression in SAT of genes involved in lipid storage (FABP4, DGAT1, FASN) were reduced in T2D subjects compared with controls, but no differences were seen for genes involved in lipolysis. T2D subjects had elevated markers of beta-oxidation, alpha-hydroxybutyrate (1.4-fold, P < 0.01) and p-hydroxybutyrate (1.7-fold, P < 0.05) in plasma. In multivariate analysis, HbA1c, visceral adipose tissue volume and sex (male) were significantly associated with NEFA AUC in T2D subjects. Conclusions. In T2D subjects, NEFA turnover is impaired, but not due to defects in lipolysis or lipid beta-oxidation. Impaired adipose NEFA re-esterification or de novo lipogenesis is likely to contribute to higher NEFA plasma levels in T2D. The data suggest that hyperglycemia and adiposity are important contributing factors for the regulation of plasma NEFA concentrations.

Keywords
Lipolysis, Type 2 diabetes, Adipose tissue, Metabolism, Lipid storage
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311176 (URN)10.1016/j.metabol.2016.09.008 (DOI)000388158700007 ()27832864 (PubMedID)
Funder
AstraZenecaSwedish Diabetes Association
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Abrahamsson, N. (2016). On the Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Glucose Homeostasis. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Glucose Homeostasis
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Obesity has grown to epidemic proportions, and in lack of efficient life-style and medical treatments, the bariatric surgeries are performed in rising numbers. The most common surgery is the Gastric Bypass (GBP) surgery, with the Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (DS) as an option for the most extreme cases with a BMI>50 kg/m2.

In paper I 20 GBP-patients were examined during the first post-operative year regarding the natriuretic peptide, NT-ProBNP, which is secreted from the cardiac ventricles. Levels of NT-ProBNP quickly increased during the first post-surgery week, and later established itself on a higher level than pre-surgery.

In paper II we report of 5 patient-cases after GBP-surgery with severe problems with postprandial hypoglycaemia that were successfully treated with GLP-1-analogs. The effect of treatment could be observed both symptomatically and in some cases using continuous glucose measuring systems (CGMS).

In paper III three groups of subjects; 15 post-GBP patients, 15 post-DS, and 15 obese controls were examined for three days using CGMS during everyday life. The post-GBP group had high glucose variability as measured by MAGE and CONGA, whereas the post-DS group had low variability. Both post-operative groups exhibited significant time in hypoglycaemia, about 40 and 80 minutes per day <3.3mmol/l and 20 and 40 minutes < 2.8mmol/l, respectively, longer time for DS-group. Remarkably, only about 20% of these hypoglycaemic episodes were accompanied with symptoms.

In Paper IV the hypoglycaemia counter regulatory system was investigated; 12 patients were examined before and after GBP-surgery with a stepped hypoglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. The results show a downregulation of symptoms, counter regulatory hormones (glucagon, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, growth hormone), incretin hormones (GLP-1 and GIP), and sympathetic nervous response.

In conclusion patients post bariatric surgery exhibit a downregulated counter regulatory response to hypoglycaemia, accompanied by frequent asymptomatic hypoglycaemic episodes in everyday life. Patients suffering from severe hypoglycaemic episodes can often be treated successfully with GLP-1-analogues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2016. p. 73
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1181
Keywords
Hypoglycaemia, Gastric Bypass surgery, Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (DS), NT-ProBNP, Continuous glucose measuring system (CGMS), GLP-1-analog, glucose variability, MAGE, CONGA, counter regulation, incretin, Heart Rate Variability
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Endocrinology and Diabetology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-276381 (URN)978-91-554-9480-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-04-08, Gunnesalen, ing 10, Akademiska Sjukhuset i Uppsala, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2016-03-17Bibliographically approved
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