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Adamsson, Viola
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Adamsson, V., Reumark, A., Marklund, M., Larsson, A. & Risérus, U. (2015). Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: A randomized controlled trial. Clinical Nutrition, 34(1), 20-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: A randomized controlled trial
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2015 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels.

METHODS:

In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The primary outcome was plasma LDL-C. Secondary outcomes were other blood lipids, body weight, sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD), glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and inflammation markers (C-reactive protein [CRP] and tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 [TNF-R2]), and blood pressure. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

RESULTS:

No differences were found in LDL-C, other blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 decreased more during PB compared with controls (p < 0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and β-glucan compared with controls (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation. The trial was registered in the Current Controlled Trials database (http://www.controlled-trials.com); International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 84550872.

National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228727 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2014.04.009 (DOI)000349574500004 ()24814382 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-07-21 Created: 2014-07-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Witasp, A., Carrero, J. J., Michaëlsson, K., Ahlström, H., Kullberg, J., Adamsson, V., . . . Ärnlöv, J. (2014). Inflammatory biomarker pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in relation to obesity, body fat depots, and weight loss. Obesity, 22(5), 1373-1379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory biomarker pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in relation to obesity, body fat depots, and weight loss
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2014 (English)In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1373-1379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The relation between inflammatory markers, adiposity and disease is under extensive study. Here we tested the hypothesis that the immunomodulatory protein pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is associated with adiposity in the general population.

DESIGN AND METHODS: Serum PTX3 concentrations, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and fat depots, as quantified by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging, were assessed in three community-based cohorts: ULSAM, n = 790, mean age 78 years; PIVUS, n = 1003, mean age 70 years, women 50%; and the NORDIET-trial, n = 86, mean age 53 years, women 63%. Participants were re-examined after 5 years (PIVUS, n = 804) or following a 6-week randomized controlled dietary intervention (NORDIET).

RESULTS: PTX3 levels were inversely associated with BMI and WC as well as with total and visceral fat (P < 0.05 for all; adjusted for age, inflammatory biomarkers and cardiovascular risk factors). The association between PTX3 and BMI appeared even stronger in nonobese individuals. A decrease in BMI over 5 years as well as weight loss following the NORDIET intervention were associated with increased serum PTX3 concentrations (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: These consistent data support an inverse association between circulating PTX3 and anthropometrical measures, calling for further mechanistic studies of the link between PTX3 and fat.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-220519 (URN)10.1002/oby.20695 (DOI)000336034400049 ()24415446 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-12 Created: 2014-03-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Adamsson, V., Cederholm, T., Vessby, B. & Riserus, U. (2014). Influence of a healthy Nordic diet on serum fatty acid composition and associations with blood lipoproteins: results from the NORDIET study. Food & Nutrition Research, 58, 24114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of a healthy Nordic diet on serum fatty acid composition and associations with blood lipoproteins: results from the NORDIET study
2014 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 58, p. 24114-Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The fatty acid (FA) composition of serum lipids is related to the quality of dietary fat. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on the FA composition of serum cholesterol esters (CE-FA) and assess the associations between changes in the serum CE-FA composition and blood lipoproteins during a controlled dietary intervention.

Methods: The NORDIET trial was a six-week randomised, controlled, parallel-group dietary intervention study that included 86 adults (53±8 years) with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol LDL-C. Serum CE-FA composition was measured using gas chromatography. Diet history interviews were conducted, and daily intake was assessed using checklists.

Results: Food and nutrient intake data indicated that there was a reduction in the fat intake from dairy and meat products and an increase in the consumption of fatty fish with the ND, decreasing the levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in the diet, slightly decreasing the levels of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and moderately increasing the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Concomitantly, the levels of CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0, but not 16:0, decreased during the ND, and these changes differed from those observed in the control diet group (p<0.01). In contrast, serum 22:6n-3 increased during the ND compared with the control diet (p<0.01). The changes in CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0 during the intervention correlated positively with those in LDL-C, HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, ApoA1 and ApoB (p<0.01), whereas the changes in CE-PUFA 22:6n-3 were negatively correlated with changes in the corresponding serum lipids.

Conclusions: The decreased intake of saturated fat and increased intake of n-3 PUFA in a healthy Nordic diet are partly reflected by changes in the serum CE-FA composition, which are associated with an improved serum lipoprotein pattern.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211868 (URN)10.3402/fnr.v58.24114 (DOI)000345968000001 ()25476792 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-12-02 Created: 2013-12-02 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Jobs, E., Adamsson, V., Larsson, A., Jobs, M., Nerpin, E., Ingelsson, E., . . . Risérus, U. (2014). Influence of a prudent diet on circulating cathepsin S in humans. Nutrition Journal, 13, 84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of a prudent diet on circulating cathepsin S in humans
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2014 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 13, p. 84-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Increased circulating cathepsin S levels have been linked to increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases and cancer. However, whether cathepsin S is a modifiable risk factor is unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects of a prudent diet on plasma cathepsin S levels in healthy individuals. Findings: Explorative analyses of a randomized study were performed in 88 normal to slightly overweight and hyperlipidemic men and women (aged 25 to 65) that were randomly assigned to ad libitum prudent diet, i.e. healthy Nordic diet (ND) or a control group (habitual Western diet) for 6 weeks. Whereas all foods in the ND were provided, the control group was advised to consume their habitual diet throughout the study. The ND was in line with dietary recommendations, e. g. low in saturated fats, sugars and salt, but high in plant-based foods rich in fibre and unsaturated fats. The ND significantly decreased cathepsin S levels (from 20.1 (+/-4.0 SD) to 19.7 mu g/L (+/-4.3 SD)) compared with control group (from 18.2 (+/-2.9 SD) to 19.1 mu g/L (+/-3.8 SD)). This difference remained after adjusting for sex and change in insulin sensitivity (P = 0.03), and near significant after adjusting for baseline cathepsin S levels (P = 0.06), but not for change in weight or LDL-C. Changes in cathepsin S levels were directly correlated with change in LDL-C. Conclusions: Compared with a habitual control diet, a provided ad libitum healthy Nordic diet decreased cathepsin S levels in healthy individuals, possibly mediated by weight loss or lowered LDL-C. These differences between groups in cathepsin S were however not robust and therefore need further investigation.

Keywords
Nordic prudent diet, Cathepsin S, Weight loss, Cardiometabolic risk factors
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233023 (URN)10.1186/1475-2891-13-84 (DOI)000341112000001 ()
Available from: 2014-10-06 Created: 2014-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Adamsson, V. (2013). A Healthy Nordic Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: Intervention Studies with Special Emphasis on Plasma Lipoproteins. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Healthy Nordic Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: Intervention Studies with Special Emphasis on Plasma Lipoproteins
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A healthy diet is important in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Several risk factors, modifiable by diet, are involved in the development of CVD, e.g. hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, obesity and hypertension. Little data however exist on diets composed of foods originating from the Nordic countries, and their potential to reduce CVD risk.

This thesis aimed to investigate whether an ad libitum healthy Nordic diet (ND), either provided as a whole diet, or as a prudent breakfast (PB) alone, could influence CVD risk factors in healthy, mildly hypercholesterolemic men and women. Another aim was to describe the nutrient and food composition of the ND, both by using self-reported data and serum biomarkers of dietary fat quality.

The primary clinical outcome measure was LDL-cholesterol, and other cardiometabolic risk factors were secondary outcomes.

Two parallel, randomised, controlled intervention studies were conducted in free-living subjects. Clinical and dietary assessments were performed at baseline and at the end of dietary interventions. All foods were provided to subjects randomised to ND, whereas only breakfast items were supplied to subjects randomised to PB. Control groups followed their habitual diet/breakfast.

Compared with controls, ND reduced body weight and improved several CVD risk factors including LDL-cholesterol, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Several, but not all effects were probably partly mediated by diet-induced weight loss. ND accorded with Nordic nutrition recommendations and was defined as “a plant-based diet, where animal products are used sparingly as side dishes”. Compared with average Swedish diet, ND was high in dietary fibre, but low in sodium, meat, high-fat dairy products, sweets and alcohol. A decreased intake of saturated fat and increased intake of n-3 PUFA during ND was partly reflected in serum lipids. Eating a PB without other dietary changes did not improve lipid or glucose metabolism, but decreased markers of visceral fat and inflammation, without influencing body weight.

This thesis suggests that a whole ND, but not PB alone, promotes weight loss and improves multiple CVD risk factors in healthy subjects after 6 weeks. These results suggest that ND could have a potential role in the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2013. p. x+85
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 956
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211874 (URN)978-91-554-8820-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-01-24, Auditorium Minus, Museum Gustavianum, Akademigatan 3, Uppsala, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-12-20 Created: 2013-12-02 Last updated: 2014-01-24
Adamsson, V., Reumark, A., Cederholm, T., Vessby, B., Risérus, U. & Johansson, G. (2012). What is a healthy Nordic diet?: Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study. Food & Nutrition Research, 56, 18189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is a healthy Nordic diet?: Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study
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2012 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 56, p. 18189-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A healthy Nordic diet (ND), a diet based on foods originating from the Nordic countries, improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure and body weight in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Objective: To describe and compare food and nutrient composition of the ND in relation to the intake of a Swedish reference population (SRP) and the recommended intake (RI) and average requirement (AR), as described by the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR). Design: The analyses were based on an estimate of actual food and nutrient intake of 44 men and women (mean age 53 +/- 8 years, BMI 26 +/- 3), representing an intervention arm receiving ND for 6 weeks. Results: The main difference between ND and SRP was the higher intake of plant foods, fish, egg and vegetable fat and a lower intake of meat products, dairy products, sweets and desserts and alcoholic beverages during ND (p<0.001 for all food groups). Intake of cereals and seeds was similar between ND and SRP (p>0.3). The relative intake of protein, fat and carbohydrates during ND was in accordance with RI. Intake of all vitamins and minerals was above AR, whereas sodium intake was below RI. Conclusions: When compared with the food intake of an SRP, ND is primarily a plant-based diet. ND represents a balanced food intake that meets the current RI and AR of NNR 2004 and has a dietary pattern that is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality.

Keywords
Nordic foods, nutrient intake, food intake, Swedish reference population, Nordic nutrition recommendations
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200134 (URN)10.3402/fnr.v56i0.18189 (DOI)000317128500001 ()
Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Adamsson, V., Reumark, A., Larsson, A. & Riserus, U. Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized controlled trial.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized controlled trial
(English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Background & Aims: It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects.

Methods: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels. In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

Results: No differences were found in LDL-C, blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 were lower during PB compared with controls (p<0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and b-glucan compared with controls (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation.

 

Keywords
Prudent breakfast, LDL-cholesterol, cardiometabolic risk factors, Nordic diet, inflammation, visceral fat
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211870 (URN)
Available from: 2013-12-02 Created: 2013-12-02 Last updated: 2014-01-24Bibliographically approved
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