uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Puthoopparambil, Soorej JoseORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9113-9259
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Villarroel, N., Hannigan, A., Severoni, S., Puthoopparambil, S. J. & MacFarlane, A. (2019). Migrant health research in the Republic of Ireland: a scoping review. BMC Public Health, 19(1), Article ID 324.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Migrant health research in the Republic of Ireland: a scoping review
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 324Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Migration to European countries has increased in number and diversity in recent years. Factors such as access to healthcare, language barriers and legal status can impact the health outcomes of migrant groups. However, little is known about the evidence base on the health status of migrants in the Republic of Ireland. Our aim was to scope existing peer-reviewed research on the health of migrants in Ireland and identify any gaps in the evidence.

Methods: We conducted a scoping review of peer-reviewed research on the health of migrants in the Republic of Ireland. Eleven electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed, empirical articles published between 2001 and 2017. Search terms were adapted from a World Health Organisation review. Findings were analysed using the 2016 World Health Organisation Strategy and Action Plan for Refugee and Migrant Health in the World Health Organisation European region, which outlines nine strategic areas that require collaborative action.

Results: Of 9396 articles retrieved, 80 met inclusion criteria, with the majority (81%) published since 2009. More than half of the studies had a quantitative design (65%). Migrants studied came from Eastern Europe, Asia and Africa and included labour migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. Most studies related to two World Health Organisation strategic areas; 4: “achieving public health preparedness and ensuring an effective response”, and 5: “strengthening health systems and their resilience”.

Conclusion: There is growing attention to migrant health in Ireland with a balance of qualitative and quantitative research. While much of the identified research is relevant to three of the World Health Organisation strategic areas, there are significant gaps in the other six areas. The study design could be replicated in other countries to examine and inform migrant health research.

Keywords
Immigrant; Health, Ireland, Scoping review, World health organization
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379959 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-6651-2 (DOI)000462245400001 ()30894147 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
O'Doherty, J., Leader, L. F., O'Regan, A., Dunne, C., Puthoopparambil, S. J. & O'Connor, R. (2019). Over prescribing of antibiotics for acute respiratory tract infections; a qualitative study to explore Irish general practitioners' perspectives.. BMC Family Practice, 20(1), Article ID 27.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Over prescribing of antibiotics for acute respiratory tract infections; a qualitative study to explore Irish general practitioners' perspectives.
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Anti-microbial resistance (AMR) is a global threat to public health and antibiotics are often unnecessarily prescribed for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in general practice. We aimed to investigate why general practitioners (GPs) continue to prescribe antibiotics for ARTIs despite increasing knowledge of their poor efficacy and worsening antimicrobial resistance.

METHODS: We used an explorative qualitative study design. Thirteen GPs were recruited through purposive sampling to represent urban and rural settings and years of experience. They were based in general practices within the Mid-West of Ireland. GPs took part in semi-structured interviews that were digitally audio recorded and transcribed.

RESULTS: Three main themes and three subthemes were identified. Themes include (1) non-comprehensive guidelines; how guideline adherence can be difficult, (2) GPs under pressure; pressures to prescribe from patients and perceived patient expectations and (3) Unnecessary prescribing; how to address it and the potential of public interventions to reduce it.

CONCLUSIONS: GPs acknowledge their failure to implement guidelines because they feel they are less usable in clinical situations. GPs felt pressurised to prescribe, especially for fee-paying patients and in out of hours settings (OOH), suggesting the need for interventions that target the public's perceptions of antibiotics. GPs behaviours surrounding prescribing antibiotics need to change in order to reduce AMR and change patients' expectations.

Keywords
Acute respiratory tract infections, Antibiotic resistance, Antibiotics, General practice
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377517 (URN)10.1186/s12875-019-0917-8 (DOI)000458995300001 ()30764777 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Takahashi, R., Kruja, K., Puthoopparambil, S. J. & Severoni, S. (2019). Refugee and migrant health in the European Region. The Lancet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Refugee and migrant health in the European Region
2019 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383867 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30282-X (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-24 Last updated: 2019-05-24
Bjerneld, M., Ismail, N. & Puthoopparambil, S. J. (2018). Experiences and reflections of Somali unaccompanied girls on their first years in Sweden: a follow-up study after two decades. International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, 14(3), 305-317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences and reflections of Somali unaccompanied girls on their first years in Sweden: a follow-up study after two decades
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 305-317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose:

Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) from Somalia are one of the largest groups of UASC in Europe and Sweden. The current study is a follow-up of a Swedish study conducted in 1999, where unaccompanied asylum-seeking girls (UASG) from Somalia were interviewed. In 2013, UASG from the 1999 study were interviewed again, as adults who have settled and found a new life in Sweden. The purpose of this paper is to explore how these women experienced their transition into the Swedish society.

Design/methodology/approach:

A qualitative research design using semi-structured interviews was adopted for this descriptive study. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.

Findings:

UASG need support from different groups of adults, ranging from the staff at the group homes to community members, including countrymen, to establish a good life in their new country. The UASG need understanding and knowledgeable staff that can support them through the initial period, when they do not have their parents close to them. All actors in the supporter network need more knowledge about the difficulties in war situations. Former UASC can assist newcomers as well as being informants to authorities in a new country. Both parties involved need to be open and willing to learn from each other.

Research limitations/implications:

UASG who consider themselves successful in being integrated into the Swedish society were interviewed and, therefore, the study mainly describes aspects that promote integration.

Originality/value:

There are limited follow-up studies on how UASG have experienced their life after almost two decades in the new country.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363959 (URN)10.1108/IJMHSC-03-2018-0018 (DOI)000444238100007 ()30333858 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Essén, B., Puthoopparambil, S. J., Mosselmans, L. & Salzmann, T. (2018). Improving the health care of pregnant refugee and migrant women and newborn children: Technical guidance. Copenhagen: WHO Regional Office for Europe
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving the health care of pregnant refugee and migrant women and newborn children: Technical guidance
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

While the amplitude and direction of variations in outcomes differ between host countries, migrant origin/status and the outcome examined, there is a marked trend for worse pregnancy-related indicators among refugees and migrants. Being a migrant can be considered a risk factor in itself for poorer maternal and newborn health outcomes and also be a proxy for other risk factors and potential explanations. This technical guidance identifies problems and entry points for interventions for maternal and newborn health in refugees and migrants in the WHO European Region. Policy considerations are outlined for four main areas affecting refugee and migrant maternal and newborn health: individual health status, accessibility of health care, quality of care, and health care policy and financing systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: WHO Regional Office for Europe, 2018
Keywords
INFANT HEALTH, MATERNAL HEALTH, MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES, TRANSIENTS AND MIGRANTS, REFUGEES, HEALTH SERVICES ACCESSIBILITY, EUROPE
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373584 (URN)978 92 890 5381 5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-03-22
Pusztai, Z., Zivanov, I., Severoni, S., Puthoopparambil, S. J., Vuksanovic, H., Stojkovic, S. G. & Violeta, E. (2018). Refugee and migrant health –: improving access to health care for people in between. Public Health Panorama, 4(2), 220-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Refugee and migrant health –: improving access to health care for people in between
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Public Health Panorama, ISSN 2412-544X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 220-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since 2015, Serbia has been a central waypoint along the western Balkans migration route. After the closure of the humanitarian corridor in March 2016, thousands remained trapped in Serbia reluctant to seek asylum, as this would undermine their chances of finding protection in one of the EU Member States. The WHO Country Office for Serbia needed to address the challenges involved in providing health services to persons with an often unregulated legal status and in the context of limited financial and human resources of the national health system. Further difficulties included unmet hygienic, sanitary and health needs of persons voluntarily staying outside state shelters, and the cultural and language barriers preventing provision of health care.In line with the Strategy and action plan for refugee and migrant health laid down in the WHO European Region and resolution EUR/RC66/R6 of the WHO Regional Committee for Europe, the intervention by the WHO Country Office for Serbia was focused on a coordination role supporting the establishment of a national coordination mechanism for health services which included all state actors as well as NGOs. Thus, the services provided by nongovernmental actors were included in the national public health system with the existing referral system. In parallel, development of Migrant Health Information System was supported, providing a surveillance and monitoring mechanism while further resources were mobilized through the United Nations and partners development framework to support public health services and capacitie

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: World Health Organization, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381763 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Hargreaves, S., Rustage, K., Nellums, L., Powis, J., Milburn, J., Severoni, S., . . . Friedland, J. (2018). What constitutes an effective and efficient package of services for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care of tuberculosis among refugees and migrants in the WHO European Region?: Themed issues on migration and health, VIII. Copenhagen: World Health Organization
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What constitutes an effective and efficient package of services for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care of tuberculosis among refugees and migrants in the WHO European Region?: Themed issues on migration and health, VIII
Show others...
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The WHO European Region has faced high rates of external and internal migration in recent years, with concerns that this is contributing to the burden of tuberculosis (TB), multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and TB/HIV coinfection in some countries. This report examines evidence of effective and efficient service packages for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of TB to inform strategies to address the TB burden in refugee and migrant populations. Significant regional variations were identified in both migration levels and TB burden in refugees and migrants, as well as in approaches to TB control, with low quality of evidence in many cases. While it is unlikely that a single strategy/package will be effective for all situations, the evidence highlights some common approaches that could guide policy-making and service development. TB elimination targets for the Region will not be met unless inequalities in access to screening and treatment for migrants are addressed, alongside efforts to tackle

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: World Health Organization, 2018. p. 60
Series
Health Evidence Network synthesis report, ISSN 2227-4316 ; 56
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381762 (URN)9789289053105 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
McGarry, O., Hannigan, A., De Almeida, M. M., Santino, S., Puthoopparambil, S. J. & MacFarlane, A. (2018). What strategies to address communication barriers for refugees and migrants in health care settings have been implemented and evaluated across the WHO European Region? Themed issues on migration and health, IX. Copenhagen: World Health Organization
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What strategies to address communication barriers for refugees and migrants in health care settings have been implemented and evaluated across the WHO European Region? Themed issues on migration and health, IX
Show others...
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: World Health Organization, 2018
Series
HEALTH EVIDENCE NETWORK SYNTHESIS REPORT, ISSN 2227-4316 ; 62
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381760 (URN)978 92 890 5350 1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Puthoopparambil, S. J. & Bjerneld, M. (2016). Detainees, staff and healthcare services in immigration detention centers: A descriptive comparison of detention systems in Sweden and the Benelux countries. Global Health Action, 9, Article ID 30358.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detainees, staff and healthcare services in immigration detention centers: A descriptive comparison of detention systems in Sweden and the Benelux countries
2016 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 30358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Immigration detention has been shown to negatively affect the health and well-being of detainees. The aim of the study was to describe and compare policies and practices that could affect the health and well-being of immigrant detainees in the Benelux countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg) to those in Sweden.

Design:

This was a case study. Data were collected in two phases using a questionnaire developed particularly for this study. In the first phase, authorities in the Benelux countries responded to the questionnaire via email. During the second phase, a research team visited detention centres in the Benelux countries to observe and further explore, strengthening findings through triangulation. Data on Swedish detention centres were collected in previous studies.

Results:

Compared to the Benelux countries, Sweden has limited health care provision available in the detention centres. Swedish detention centres did not have mental health care professionals working at the centres and had fewer restrictions within the centres with regard to access to mobile phone, internet, and various recreational activities. Compared to Sweden, the detention centres in the Benelux countries have more staff categories providing services to the detainees that are provided with relevant and timely on-the-job training. All the countries, except Belgium, provide subsistence allowances to detainees.

Conclusion:

Despite the Common European Asylum System framework, differences exist among the four European Union member states in providing services to immigrant detainees. This study highlights these differences, thereby providing a window on how these diverse approaches may serve as a learning tool for improving services offered to immigrant detainees. In Sweden, the health care available to detainees and training and recruitment of staff should be improved, while the Benelux countries should strive to reduce restrictions within detention centres.

Keywords
health care, detention staff, immigrant detainee, Common European Asylum System, European Union
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274971 (URN)10.3402/gha.v9.30358 (DOI)000376073700001 ()26950568 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-27 Created: 2016-01-27 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Puthoopparambil, S. J. (2016). Life in Immigration Detention Centers: An exploration of health of immigrant detainees in Sweden and three other EU member states. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life in Immigration Detention Centers: An exploration of health of immigrant detainees in Sweden and three other EU member states
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Governments around the world use immigration detention to detain and deport irregular immigrants, which negatively affects their health. The aim of this thesis was to explore, describe and identify factors that could mitigate the effect of immigration detention on the health of detainees. This was a mixed method study using qualitative methods (Papers I and II), quantitative methods (Paper III) and descriptive case comparison (Paper IV) comparing the Swedish system to the system in the Benelux countries (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg). The study design was strengthened by triangulation of methods and data sources.

Detainees experienced lack of control over their own lives due to lack of information in a language they can understand, inadequate responses from detention staff and restrictions within detention centers further limiting their liberty. Duration of detention was negatively associated with satisfaction of services provided in detention and the detainees’ Quality of Life (QOL). Detainees had low QOL domain scores with the psychological domain having the lowest score (41.9/100). The most significant factor positively associated with the QOL of detainees was the support received from detention staff. A sense of fear was present among detainees and staff. Detainees’ fear was due to their inadequate interaction with authorities, perceiving it as threatening, and due to their worry of facing repercussions of being involved in incidents caused by others. The potential for physical threat from detainees created a sense of fear among the staff. The detention staff expressed the need for more support to manage their emotional dilemma and role conflict of being a civil servant, simultaneously enabling the deportation process while providing humane care to detainees as fellow human beings. Detention centers in the Benelux countries had more categories of staff providing different services to detainees. Compared to the Benelux countries, healthcare services at the Swedish detention centers were limited. Detainees were offered no medical screening on arrival and no regular access to mental healthcare professionals.

Detaining authorities have the obligation to safeguard the health of detainees. Challenges faced by the detention staff and detainees must be addressed to create a supportive environment and fulfill that obligation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2016. p. 96
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1176
Keywords
Immigration detention, irregular migrants, asylum-seeker, detention staff, Quality of Life, migration and health, health promotion, European Union, Common European Asylum System, Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
International Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-272493 (URN)978-91-554-9468-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-04-21, Auditorium Minus, Museum Gustavianum, Akademigatan 3, Uppsala, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2019-02-21
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9113-9259

Search in DiVA

Show all publications