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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Hellmer, K., Stenberg, G. & Fawcett, C. (2018). Preschoolers' conformity (and its motivation) is linked to own and parents' personalities. British Journal of Developmental Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preschoolers' conformity (and its motivation) is linked to own and parents' personalities
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0261-510X, E-ISSN 2044-835XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies on conformity have primarily focused on factors that moderate conformity rates overall and paid little attention to explaining the individual differences. In the current study we investigate five factor model personality traits of both parents and children and experimentally-elicited conformity in 3.5-year-olds (N=59) using an Asch-like paradigm with which we measure both overt conformity (public responses) and covert opinions (private beliefs after conformist responses): A correct covert opinion after an incorrect conformist response results from a socially normative motivation whereas an incorrect covert opinion results from an informational motivation. Our data show (1) low parental extroversion is associated with participants’ overall rate of conformity; (2) and low participant extroversion and high openness are associated with an informational instead of a normative motivation to conform. This suggests that sensitivity to the social context or social engagement level, as manifested through extroversion, could be an important factor in conformist behaviour.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348652 (URN)10.1111/bjdp.12243 (DOI)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC StG CACTUS 312292
Available from: 2018-04-16 Created: 2018-04-16 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
Shutts, K., Kenward, B., Falk, H., Ivegran, A. & Fawcett, C. (2017). Early preschool environments and gender: Effects of gender pedagogy in Sweden. Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), 162, 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early preschool environments and gender: Effects of gender pedagogy in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 162, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To test how early social environments affect children's consideration of gender, 3- to 6-year-old children (N = 80) enrolled in gender-neutral or typical preschool programs in the central district of a large Swedish city completed measures designed to assess their gender-based social preferences, stereotypes, and automatic encoding. Compared with children in typical preschools, a greater proportion of children in the gender-neutral school were interested in playing with unfamiliar other-gender children. In addition, children attending the gender-neutral preschool scored lower on a gender stereotyping measure than children attending typical preschools. Children at the gender-neutral school, however, were not less likely to automatically encode others' gender. The findings suggest that gender-neutral pedagogy has moderate effects on how children think and feel about people of different genders but might not affect children's tendency to spontaneously notice gender.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2017
Keyword
Children, Gender, Attitudes, Stereotypes, Encoding, Socialization
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331206 (URN)10.1016/j.jecp.2017.04.014 (DOI)000405539800001 ()28551105 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1785
Available from: 2017-10-16 Created: 2017-10-16 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved
Fawcett, C. & Tunçgenç, B. (2017). Infants' use of movement synchrony to infer social affiliation in others. Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), 160, 127-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infants' use of movement synchrony to infer social affiliation in others
2017 (English)In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 160, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Infants socially engage with others and observe others' social interactions from early in life. One characteristic found to be important for signaling and establishing affiliative social relationships is physical coordination and synchronization of movements. This study investigated whether synchrony in others' movements signals affiliation to 12- and 15-month-old infants. The infants were shown a scene in which two characters moved either synchronously or non-synchronously with a third character in the center. Next, the center character made an affiliation declaration and subsequently approached and cuddled one of the two characters. Using measures of gaze, we gauged infants' inferences about whom the center character would affiliate with before the cuddling took place. We found that 15-month-olds, but not 12-month-olds, inferred that the center character would affiliate with the previously synchronous character, suggesting that they can make inferences about others' affiliation based on movement synchrony. The findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to the infants' personal preferences and the potential importance of first-person experience in the development of social cognition.

Keyword
Affiliation inference, Eye tracking, Infant, Social cognition, Third-person evaluation, Synchrony
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323750 (URN)10.1016/j.jecp.2017.03.014 (DOI)000401376400010 ()28427721 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-1156
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2017-06-13Bibliographically approved
Fawcett, C., Wesevich, V., Truedsson, E., Wåhlstedt, C. & Gredebäck, G. (2016). Callous-unemotional traits affect adolescents' perception of collaboration. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 57(12), 1400-1406
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Callous-unemotional traits affect adolescents' perception of collaboration
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1400-1406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: How is the perception of collaboration influenced by individual characteristics, in particular high levels of callous-unemotional (CU) traits? CU traits are associated with low empathy and endorsement of negative social goals such as dominance and forced respect. Thus, it is possible that they could relate to difficulties in interpreting that others are collaborating based on a shared goal.

METHODS: In the current study, a community sample of 15- to 16-year olds participated in an eye tracking task measuring whether they expect that others engaged in an action sequence are collaborating, depending on the emotion they display toward each other. Positive emotion would indicate that they share a goal, while negative emotion would indicate that they hold individual goals.

RESULTS: When the actors showed positive emotion toward each other, expectations of collaboration varied with CU traits. The higher adolescents were on CU traits, the less likely they were to expect collaboration. When the actors showed negative emotion toward each other, CU traits did not influence expectations of collaboration.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that CU traits are associated with difficulty in perceiving positive social interactions, which could further contribute to the behavioral and emotional problems common to those with high CU traits.

Keyword
Autism; Gaze following; Joint attention; Early development; Neurodevelopmental disorders; Social cognition; Communication; Younger siblings
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309033 (URN)10.1111/jcpp.12588 (DOI)000388500300007 ()27363607 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC-StG CACTUS 312292Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0869
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Fawcett, C., Wesevich, V. & Gredebäck, G. (2016). Pupillary Contagion in Infancy: Evidence for spontaneous transfer of arousal. Psychological Science, 27(7), 997-1003
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pupillary Contagion in Infancy: Evidence for spontaneous transfer of arousal
2016 (English)In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, E-ISSN 1467-9280, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 997-1003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pupillary contagionresponding to pupil size observed in other people with changes in one's own pupilhas been found in adults and suggests that arousal and other internal states could be transferred across individuals using a subtle physiological cue. Examining this phenomenon developmentally gives insight into its origins and underlying mechanisms, such as whether it is an automatic adaptation already present in infancy. In the current study, 6- and 9-month-olds viewed schematic depictions of eyes with smaller and larger pupilspairs of concentric circles with smaller and larger black centerswhile their own pupil sizes were recorded. Control stimuli were comparable squares. For both age groups, infants' pupil size was greater when they viewed large-center circles than when they viewed small-center circles, and no differences were found for large-center compared with small-center squares. The findings suggest that infants are sensitive and responsive to subtle cues to other people's internal states, a mechanism that would be beneficial for early social development.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-286549 (URN)10.1177/0956797616643924 (DOI)000380937800006 ()27207876 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC-StG CACTUS 312292
Available from: 2016-04-20 Created: 2016-04-20 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Fawcett, C., Wesevich, V. & Gredebäck, G. (2016). Pupillary Contagion in Infancy: Evidence for the Spontaneous Transfer of Arousal. In: : . Paper presented at International Conference on Infant Studies, New Orleans, USA; May 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pupillary Contagion in Infancy: Evidence for the Spontaneous Transfer of Arousal
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-289188 (URN)
Conference
International Conference on Infant Studies, New Orleans, USA; May 2016
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2016-04-29
Thorgrimsson, G. B., Fawcett, C. & Liszkowski, U. (2015). 1-and 2-year-olds' expectations about third-party communicative actions. Infant Behavior and Development, 39, 53-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>1-and 2-year-olds' expectations about third-party communicative actions
2015 (English)In: Infant Behavior and Development, ISSN 0163-6383, E-ISSN 1879-0453, Vol. 39, p. 53-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Infants expect people to direct actions toward objects, and they respond to actions directed to themselves, but do they have expectations about actions directed to third parties? In two experiments, we used eye tracking to investigate 1- and 2-year-olds' expectations about communicative actions addressed to a third party. Experiment 1 presented infants with videos where an adult (the Emitter) either uttered a sentence or produced non-speech sounds. The Emitter was either face-to-face with another adult (the Recipient) or the two were back-to-back. The Recipient did not respond to any of the sounds. We found that 2-, but not 1-year-olds looked quicker and longer at the Recipient following speech than non-speech, suggesting that they expected her to respond to speech. These effects were specific to the face-to-face context. Experiment 2 presented 1-year-olds with similar face-to-face exchanges but modified to engage infants and minimize task demands. The infants looked quicker to the Recipient following speech than non-speech, suggesting that they expected a response to speech. The study suggests that by 1 year of age infants expect communicative actions to be directed at a third-party listener.

Keyword
Action understanding, Third-party interactions, Turn-taking, Communicative development, Eye tracking
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-257035 (URN)10.1016/j.infbeh.2015.02.002 (DOI)000355375000006 ()25766104 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-29 Created: 2015-06-29 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Tuncgenc, B. & Fawcett, C. (2015). Are Infants’ Social Preferences Grounded in Action Synchrony?. In: : . Paper presented at Presented at the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA, USA. March 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Infants’ Social Preferences Grounded in Action Synchrony?
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284572 (URN)
Conference
Presented at the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA, USA. March 2015.
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2016-04-29
Truedsson, E., Gredebäck, G., Fawcett, C. & Wåhlstedt, C. (2015). Callous-Unemotional Traits Influence Pupil Dilation during Exposure to Negative Emotional Stimuli. In: : . Paper presented at Presented at the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA, USA. March 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Callous-Unemotional Traits Influence Pupil Dilation during Exposure to Negative Emotional Stimuli
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284569 (URN)
Conference
Presented at the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA, USA. March 2015.
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-01-25
Fawcett, C. & Gredebäck, G. (2015). Eighteen-Month-Olds, but not 14-Month-Olds, Use Social Context to Bind Action Sequences. Infancy, 20(1), 115-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eighteen-Month-Olds, but not 14-Month-Olds, Use Social Context to Bind Action Sequences
2015 (English)In: Infancy, ISSN 1525-0008, E-ISSN 1532-7078, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 115-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We demonstrate that 18-month-olds, but not 14-month-olds, can anticipate others' actions based on an interpretation of shared goals that bind together individual actions into a collaborative sequence. After viewing a sequence of actions performed by two people who socially interact, 18-month-olds bound together the socially engaged actors' actions such that they later expected the actors to share the same final goal. Eighteen-month-olds who saw nonsocially engaged actors did not have this expectation and neither did 14-month-olds when viewing either socially or nonsocially engaged actors. The results are discussed in light of the possibility that experience in collaborations could be necessary for understanding collaboration from a third-person perspective.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-241392 (URN)10.1111/infa.12062 (DOI)000346173800006 ()
Available from: 2015-01-22 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0898-9920

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