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Zwoinska, Martyna K.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3356-7284
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Zwoinska, M. K., Larva, T., Sekajova, Z., Carlsson, H., Meurling, S. & Maklakov, A. A. (2020). Artificial selection for increased dispersal results in lower fitness. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 33(2), 217-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artificial selection for increased dispersal results in lower fitness
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 217-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dispersal often covaries with other traits, and this covariation was shown to have a genetic basis. Here, we wanted to explore to what extent genetic constraints and correlational selection can explain patterns of covariation between dispersal and key life-history traits-lifespan and reproduction. A prediction from the fitness-associated dispersal hypothesis was that lower genetic quality is associated with higher dispersal propensity as driven by the benefits of genetic mixing. We wanted to contrast it with a prediction from a different model that individuals putting more emphasis on current rather than future reproduction disperse more, as they are expected to be more risk-prone and exploratory. However, if dispersal has inherent costs, this will also result in a negative genetic correlation between higher rates of dispersal and some aspects of performance. To explore this issue, we used the dioecious nematode Caenorhabditis remanei and selected for increased and decreased dispersal propensity for 10 generations, followed by five generations of relaxed selection. Dispersal propensity responded to selection, and females from high-dispersal lines dispersed more than females from low-dispersal lines. Females selected for increased dispersal propensity produced fewer offspring and were more likely to die from matricide, which is associated with a low physiological condition in Caenorhabditis nematodes. There was no evidence for differences in age-specific reproductive effort between high- and low-dispersal females. Rather, reproductive output of high-dispersal females was consistently reduced. We argue that our data provide support for the fitness-associated dispersal hypothesis.

Keywords
artificial selection, Caenorhabditis, dispersal syndromes, fitness-associated dispersal, life-history theory
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329033 (URN)10.1111/jeb.13563 (DOI)000498113300001 ()31677316 (PubMedID)
Note

Titel in Thesis List of papers:

Fitness-associated dispersal: selection for increased dispersal results in lower fitness

Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2020-04-06Bibliographically approved
Zwoinska, M. K. (2017). Age-specific trade-offs in life-history evolution. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-specific trade-offs in life-history evolution
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Trade-offs prevent selection from driving all fitness-enhancing traits towards values that would maximize fitness. Life-history trade-offs, such as the one between survival and reproduction are well-studied, yet trade-offs can also involve behavioural or cognitive traits. Because males and females have different routes to successful reproduction, the optimal resolution of life-history trade-offs can differ between the sexes. However, shared genome can constrain the evolution of sex-specific adaptations. In this thesis, I explore the links between sex-specific life histories, cognition and behaviour. I start by linking sex differences in life histories to sex differences in learning performance in the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis remanei (Paper I). I report that age-related learning differs between the sexes and that it corresponds to sexual dimorphism in life history. Then, I use experimental evolution to select for learning performance to study the patterns of genetic correlations between learning and life-history traits in both sexes (Paper II). The results demonstrate the correlated evolution of sexual dimorphism in life history indicating sex-specific fitness costs and benefits of learning. In Paper III I use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to ask about the extent to which cognitive and demographic aging are independent. The results reveal that selection for late-life reproduction alone bears no effect on late-life learning and that joint selection on late-life learning and reproduction does not yield lifespan benefits. The selection might have affected, however, female age-specific reproductive effort. Motivated by the questions on aging I proceed to ask why a potent lifespan extending drug – rapamycin affects sexes differently (Paper IV). I take a closer look at the trade-off between growth, lifespan and reproduction and propose that the sex experiencing a stronger relationship between size and fitness pays a higher cost of lifespan extension. Finally, I focus on another sex-specific trait – dispersal (Paper V). I conduct experimental evolution to uncover a negative genetic correlation between dispersal and reproduction and show sex-specific genetic variation for dispersal. In summary, my thesis unravels the complex pattern of interdependence between life-history, behavioural and cognitive traits, where sex emerges as an important factor that can maintain genetic variation for trade-offs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2017. p. 48
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1555
Keywords
life history, trade-off, learning, aging, sex differences, dispersal, Caenorhabditis, Drosophila
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329035 (URN)978-91-513-0067-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-10-27, Zootissalen, Villavägen 9, Uppsala, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18
Zwoinska, M. K., Maklakov, A. A., Kawecki, T. J. & Hollis, B. (2017). Experimental evolution of slowed cognitive aging in Drosophila melanogaster. Evolution, 71(3), 662-670
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental evolution of slowed cognitive aging in Drosophila melanogaster
2017 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 662-670Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reproductive output and cognitive performance decline in parallel during aging, but it is unknown whether this reflects a shared genetic architecture or merely the declining force of natural selection acting independently on both traits. We used experimental evolution in Drosophila melanogaster to test for the presence of genetic variation for slowed cognitive aging, and assess its independence from that responsible for other traits' decline with age. Replicate experimental populations experienced either joint selection on learning and reproduction at old age (Old + Learning), selection on late-life reproduction alone (Old), or a standard two-week culture regime (Young). Within 20 generations, the Old + Learning populations evolved a slower decline in learning with age than both the Old and Young populations, revealing genetic variation for cognitive aging. We found little evidence for a genetic correlation between cognitive and demographic aging: although the Old + Learning populations tended to show higher late-life fecundity than Old populations, they did not live longer. Likewise, selection for late reproduction alone did not result in improved late-life learning. Our results demonstrate that Drosophila harbor genetic variation for cognitive aging that is largely independent from genetic variation for demographic aging and suggest that these two aspects of aging may not necessarily follow the same trajectories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
Cognitive aging, Drosophila, experimental evolution, genetic architecture, learning, trade-off
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320841 (URN)10.1111/evo.13156 (DOI)000396039000011 ()28000915 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Royal Swedish Academy of SciencesSwedish Research CouncilEU, European Research Council
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Lind, M. I., Chen, H.-y., Meurling, S., Guevara Gil, A. C., Carlsson, H., Zwoinska, M. K., . . . Maklakov, A. A. (2017). Slow development as an evolutionary cost of long life. Functional Ecology, 31(6), 1252-1261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Slow development as an evolutionary cost of long life
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2017 (English)In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1252-1261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Life-history theory predicts a trade-off between early-life fitness and life span. While the focus traditionally has been on the fecundity-life span trade-off, there are strong reasons to expect trade-offs with growth rate and/or development time. We investigated the roles of growth rate and development time in the evolution of life span in two independent selection experiments in the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis remanei. First, we found that selection under heat-shock leads to the evolution of increased life span without fecundity costs, but at the cost of slower development. Thereafter, the putative evolutionary links between development time, growth rate, fecundity, heat-shock resistance and life span were independently assessed in the second experiment by directly selecting for fast or slow development. This experiment confirmed our initial findings, since selection for slow development resulted in the evolution of long life span and increased heat-shock resistance. Because there were no consistent trade-offs with growth rate or fecundity, our results highlight the key role of development rate - differentiation of the somatic cells per unit of time - in the evolution of life span. Since development time is under strong selection in nature, reduced somatic maintenance resulting in shorter life span may be a widespread cost of rapid development.

Keywords
antagonistic pleiotropy, development time, growth, life span, stress resistance, trade-off
National Category
Ecology Zoology
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-232066 (URN)10.1111/1365-2435.12840 (DOI)000402642900009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 623-2012-6366EU, European Research Council
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
Zwoinska, M. K., Lind, M. I., Cortazar-Chinarro, M., Ramsden, M. & Maklakov, A. A. (2016). Selection on learning performance results in the correlated evolution of sexual dimorphism in life history. Evolution, 70(2), 342-357
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selection on learning performance results in the correlated evolution of sexual dimorphism in life history
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2016 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 342-357Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The evolution of learning can be constrained by trade-offs. As male and female life histories often diverge, the relationship between learning and fitness may differ between the sexes. However, because sexes share much of their genome, intersexual genetic correlations can prevent males and females from reaching their sex-specific optima resulting in intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC). To investigate if IaSC constraints sex-specific evolution of learning, we selected Caenorhabditis remanei nematode females for increased or decreased olfactory learning performance and measured learning, life span (in mated and virgin worms), reproduction, and locomotory activity in both sexes. Males from downward-selected female lines had higher locomotory activity and longer virgin life span but sired fewer progeny than males from upward-selected female lines. In contrast, we found no effect of selection on female reproduction and downward-selected females showed higher locomotory activity but lived shorter as virgins than upward-selected females. Strikingly, selection on learning performance led to the reversal of sexual dimorphism in virgin life span. We thus show sex-specific trade-offs between learning, reproduction, and life span. Our results support the hypothesis that selection on learning performance can shape the evolution of sexually dimorphic life histories via sex-specific genetic correlations.

Keywords
Caenorhabditis, cognition, intralocus sexual conflict, olfactory learning, sex-specific life histories
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282325 (URN)10.1111/evo.12862 (DOI)000370662500007 ()26787139 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Zwoinska, M., Lind, M. I. & Maklakov, A. A. (2014). Sexual Conflict: Male Control of Female Longevity. Current Biology, 24(5), R196-R198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexual Conflict: Male Control of Female Longevity
2014 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 24, no 5, p. R196-R198Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-222350 (URN)10.1016/j.cub.2014.01.044 (DOI)000332412400008 ()
Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Zwoinska, M. K., Kolm, N. & Maklakov, A. A. (2013). Sex differences in cognitive ageing: Testing predictions derived from life-history theory in a dioecious nematode. Experimental Gerontology, 48(12), 1469-1472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex differences in cognitive ageing: Testing predictions derived from life-history theory in a dioecious nematode
2013 (English)In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 48, no 12, p. 1469-1472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Life-history theory maintains that organisms allocate limited resources to different traits to maximize fitness. Learning ability and memory are costly and known to trade-off with longevity in invertebrates. However, since the relationship between longevity and fitness often differs between the sexes, it is likely that sexes will differentially resolve the trade-off between learning and longevity. We used an established associative learning paradigm in the dioecious nematode Caenorhabditis remanei, which is sexually dimorphic for lifespan, to study age-related learning ability in males and females. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that females (the shorter-lived sex) show higher learning ability than males early in life but senesce faster. Indeed, young females outperformed young males in learning a novel association between an odour (butanone) and food (bacteria). However, while learning ability and offspring production declined rapidly with age in females, males maintained high levels of these traits until mid-age. These results not only demonstrate sexual dimorphismin age-related learning ability but also suggest that it conforms to predictions derived from the life-history theory.

Keywords
Ageing, Caenorhabditis, Learning, Life-history, Sex differences, Trade-off
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213468 (URN)10.1016/j.exger.2013.09.008 (DOI)000327489800012 ()
Available from: 2013-12-30 Created: 2013-12-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3356-7284

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