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Publications (10 of 45) Show all publications
Boyden, M. (2019). Introduction to Special Issue The New Natural History. Early American literature (Print), 54(3), 633-641
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction to Special Issue The New Natural History
2019 (English)In: Early American literature (Print), ISSN 0012-8163, E-ISSN 1534-147X, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 633-641Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of North Carolina Press, 2019
National Category
Specific Literatures General Literature Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396481 (URN)10.1353/eal.2019.0061 (DOI)000489104600008 ()
Available from: 2019-11-05 Created: 2019-11-05 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved
Boyden, M. (2019). Salt and Slavery in Crevecoeur. Early American literature (Print), 54(3), 711-740
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salt and Slavery in Crevecoeur
2019 (English)In: Early American literature (Print), ISSN 0012-8163, E-ISSN 1534-147X, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 711-740Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article deals with a neglected passage in J. Hector St. John de Crevecceur's unpublished writings, in which a farmer in one of the Maritime Colonies punishes one of his slaves by tying him naked to a pole in a salt meadow. Very soon after, the slave dies from an inflammation caused by mosquito bites. The article discusses the parallels and differences between this passage and the more famous slave death scene in Charleston included in the published Letters from an American Farmer. Whereas critics have argued that James's ambivalent response to the caged slave's suffering in the Charleston episode should be attributed to Creveccuur's commitment to the dualistic ontology of modern science, this article offers an ecomaterialist reading of the salt meadow scene, revealing the presence of a competing, relational epistemology at the heart of Crevecceur's writings. Pointing to the significance of salt in eighteenth-century natural history, in particular that of Count Buffon, the article shows how the death of the slave in the salt meadow emblematizes a broader crisis in contemporary philosophies of mechanism. The salt letter moreover brings out the ethical dilemmas attendant on this epistemological crisis in late Enlightenment natural history.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of North Carolina Press, 2019
Keywords
Crevecoeur, salt, ecomaterialism, natural history, Count Buffon, relational epistemology
National Category
General Literature Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396445 (URN)10.1353/eal.2019.0064 (DOI)000489104600011 ()
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Boyden, M. (2017). The Myths That Made America: An Introduction to American Studies. [Review]. Anglia. Zeitschrift für englische Philologie, 135(1), 231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Myths That Made America: An Introduction to American Studies.
2017 (English)In: Anglia. Zeitschrift für englische Philologie, ISSN 0340-5222, E-ISSN 1865-8938, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 231-Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WALTER DE GRUYTER GMBH, 2017
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321059 (URN)10.1515/ang-2017-0022 (DOI)000398110400022 ()
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved
Boyden, M. (2016). “Daytsh iz dokh Yidish: ”Sholem Aleichem’s Motl the Cantor’s Son as Born-Translated Literature. Canadian Review of Comparative Literature, 43(3), 393-405
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Daytsh iz dokh Yidish: ”Sholem Aleichem’s Motl the Cantor’s Son as Born-Translated Literature
2016 (English)In: Canadian Review of Comparative Literature, ISSN 0319-051X, E-ISSN 1913-9659, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 393-405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What makes Sholem Aleichem’s story so interesting, apart from the fact that it evokes eerie associations with the plight of migrants in the present age, is that it chronicles the tragic demise of Eastern European Jewish life through the eyes of the widow’s youngest son Motl, whose comic observations contrast sharply with the gravity of the events but also undermine the taken-for-granted conjunction between language, territory, and identity that is at the heart of debates about world literature today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University Of Alberta Libraries, 2016
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335770 (URN)000411113500006 ()
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-15Bibliographically approved
Boyden, M. (2016). Outlandish Apocalyptics and Creaturely Life in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s ‘My Kinsman, Major Molineux’. Studia Neophilologica, 88, 47-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outlandish Apocalyptics and Creaturely Life in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s ‘My Kinsman, Major Molineux’
2016 (English)In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 88, p. 47-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article offers an analysis of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s story ‘My kinsman, Major Molineux’ in terms of Frank Kermode’s characterization of modern apocalypse. In Kermode’s optic, the transformation of apocalyptic narratives in modernity reflects a generalized move towards immanence, making them inherently self-falsificatory. The analysis highlights this double logic (immanence and self-falsification) in Hawthorne’s tale by indicating how it, on the one hand, sets up a series of contrasts between the protagonist Robin and the townspeople he meets during his search for his kinsman Molineux, and, on the other, highlights the self-falsificatory nature of the post-revolutionary social order by showing how it copies the legitimating rituals of the old regime. By drawing attention to this twofold dynamic of separation and self-alienation, the article complicates an established perspective in Hawthorne scholarship that approaches the tale as a parable of the young America. Rather than merely highlighting the transition from a monarchical system of entitlement to a voluntaristic republican order, Hawthorne’s ‘Molineux’ offers an astute reflection on how the symbolism of the former – what Eric Santner refers to as the ‘royal remains’ – survives in the latter.

Keywords
revolution; Nathaniel Hawthorne; apocalypticism; sovereignty; ritual
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274467 (URN)10.1080/00393274.2015.1096035 (DOI)000372036500005 ()
Available from: 2016-01-21 Created: 2016-01-21 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Boyden, M. (2016). Tumultuous Curiosity: Naturalism and Revolution in American Literature. In: : . Paper presented at Invited lecture at Stanford University.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tumultuous Curiosity: Naturalism and Revolution in American Literature
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Specific Languages Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280144 (URN)
Conference
Invited lecture at Stanford University
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Boyden, M. (2015). Daytsh iz dokh yidish: Translingualism in Sholem Aleichem’s Motl Peyse. In: : . Paper presented at ACLA conference, Seattle (26-29 March 2015).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daytsh iz dokh yidish: Translingualism in Sholem Aleichem’s Motl Peyse
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Specific Literatures Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280147 (URN)
Conference
ACLA conference, Seattle (26-29 March 2015)
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Boyden, M. (2015). Environmentalism, Secret Letters, and Pseudo-Translations in the Early American Printscape. In: : . Paper presented at Technologies of Print in the Age of Revolution, University of Groningen (17-18 September 2015).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmentalism, Secret Letters, and Pseudo-Translations in the Early American Printscape
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Specific Languages Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280145 (URN)
Conference
Technologies of Print in the Age of Revolution, University of Groningen (17-18 September 2015)
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Boyden, M. (2015). Ghostly Conceits: Charles Brockden Brown’s Translation of Constantin Volney. In: : . Paper presented at ASECS conference, Los Angeles (19-22 March 2015).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ghostly Conceits: Charles Brockden Brown’s Translation of Constantin Volney
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Specific Languages Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280148 (URN)
Conference
ASECS conference, Los Angeles (19-22 March 2015)
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Boyden, M. (2015). Making Sense of Translated Narrative. In: : . Paper presented at Oversattning workshop, Uppsala University (20 February 2015).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making Sense of Translated Narrative
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Specific Literatures Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280149 (URN)
Conference
Oversattning workshop, Uppsala University (20 February 2015)
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4533-6232

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