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Campione, Nicolas E.
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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Den Boer, W., Campione, N. E. & Kear, B. P. (2019). Climbing adaptations, locomotory disparity and ecological convergence in ancient stem 'kangaroos'. Royal Society Open Science, 6(2), Article ID 181617.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climbing adaptations, locomotory disparity and ecological convergence in ancient stem 'kangaroos'
2019 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 181617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Living kangaroos, wallabies and rat-kangaroos (Macropodoidea) constitute the most ecologically diverse radiation of Australasian marsupials. Indeed, even their hallmark bipedal hopping gait has been variously modified for bounding, walking and climbing. However, the origins of this locomotory adaptability are uncertain because skeletons of the most ancient macropodoids are exceptionally rare. Some of the stratigraphically oldest fossils have been attributed to Balbaridae-a clade of potentially quadrupedal stem macropodoids that became extinct during the late Miocene. Here we undertake the first assessment of balbarid locomotion using two-dimensional geometric morphometrics and a correlative multivariate analysis of linear measurements. We selected the astragalus and pedal digit IV ungual as proxies for primary gait because these elements are preserved in the only articulated balbarid skeleton, as well as some unusual early Miocene balbarid-like remains that resemble the bones of modern tree-kangaroos. Our results show that these fossils manifest character states indicative of contrasting locomotory capabilities. Furthermore, predictive modelling reveals similarities with extant macropodoids that employ either bipedal saltation and/or climbing. We interpret this as evidence for archetypal gait versatility, which probably integrated higher-speed hopping with slower-speed quadrupedal progression and varying degrees of scansoriality as independent specializations for life in forest and woodland settings.

Keywords
Macropodoidea, Balbaridae, Nambaroo, Dendrolagus, gait evolution, Miocene
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383891 (URN)10.1098/rsos.181617 (DOI)000465432900031 ()30891280 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-3587
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Benson, R. B. J., Hunt, G., Carrano, M. T. & Campione, N. E. (2018). Cope's rule and the adaptive landscape of dinosaur body size evolution. Palaeontology, 61(1), 13-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cope's rule and the adaptive landscape of dinosaur body size evolution
2018 (English)In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 13-48Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The largest known dinosaurs weighed at least 20million times as much as the smallest, indicating exceptional phenotypic divergence. Previous studies have focused on extreme giant sizes, tests of Cope's rule, and miniaturization on the line leading to birds. We use non-uniform macroevolutionary models based on Ornstein-Uhlenbeck and trend processes to unify these observations, asking: what patterns of evolutionary rates, directionality and constraint explain the diversification of dinosaur body mass? We find that dinosaur evolution is constrained by attraction to discrete body size optima that undergo rare, but abrupt, evolutionary shifts. This model explains both the rarity of multi-lineage directional trends, and the occurrence of abrupt directional excursions during the origins of groups such as tiny pygostylian birds and giant sauropods. Most expansion of trait space results from rare, constraint-breaking innovations in just a small number of lineages. These lineages shifted rapidly into novel regions of trait space, occasionally to small sizes, but most often to large or giant sizes. As with Cenozoic mammals, intermediate body sizes were typically attained only transiently by lineages on a trajectory from small to large size. This demonstrates that bimodality in the macroevolutionary adaptive landscape for land vertebrates has existed for more than 200million years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
dinosaur, body size, Cope's rule, adaptive landscape, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models, trend models, phylogenetic Bayesian information criterion
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350119 (URN)10.1111/pala.12329 (DOI)000418763800002 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 677774
Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-07 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
Bazzi, M., Kear, B. P., Blom, H., Ahlberg, P. & Campione, N. E. (2018). Static Dental Disparity and Morphological Turnover in Sharks across the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction. Current Biology, 28(16), 2607-2615
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Static Dental Disparity and Morphological Turnover in Sharks across the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction
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2018 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 16, p. 2607-2615Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction profoundly altered vertebrate ecosystems and prompted the radiation of many extant clades [1, 2]. Sharks (Selachimorpha) were one of the few larger-bodied marine predators that survived the K-Pg event and are represented by an almost-continuous dental fossil record. However, the precise dynamics of their transition through this interval remain uncertain [3]. Here, we apply 2D geometric morphometrics to reconstruct global and regional dental morphospace variation among Lamniformes (Mackerel sharks) and Carch-arhiniformes (Ground sharks). These clades are prevalent predators in today's oceans, and were geographically widespread during the late Cretaceous-early Palaeogene. Our results reveal a decoupling of morphological disparity and taxonomic richness. Indeed, shark disparity was nearly static across the K-Pg extinction, in contrast to abrupt declines among other higher-trophic-level marine predators [4, 5]. Nevertheless, specific patterns indicate that an asymmetric extinction occurred among lamniforms possessing lowcrowned/triangular teeth and that a subsequent proliferation of carcharhiniforms with similar tooth morphologies took place during the early Paleocene. This compositional shift in post-Mesozoic shark lineages hints at a profound and persistent K-Pg signature evident in the heterogeneity of modern shark communities. Moreover, such wholesale lineage turnover coincided with the loss of many cephalopod [6] and pelagic amniote [5] groups, as well as the explosive radiation of middle trophic-level teleost fishes [1]. We hypothesize that a combination of prey availability and post-extinction trophic cascades favored extant shark antecedents and laid the foundation for their extensive diversification later in the Cenozoic [7-10].

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CELL PRESS, 2018
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363937 (URN)10.1016/j.cub.2018.05.093 (DOI)000442111300030 ()30078565 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationThe Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, GS2017-0018
Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2018-10-23Bibliographically approved
Barrett, P. M., Evans, D. C. & Campione, N. E. (2015). Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures. Biology Letters, 11(6), Article ID 20150229.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures
2015 (English)In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 20150229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers.

Keywords
Dinosauria, integument, scales, feathers, phylogeny
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260146 (URN)10.1098/rsbl.2015.0229 (DOI)000357685300013 ()
Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
VanBuren, C. S., Campione, N. E. & Evans, D. C. (2015). Head size, weaponry, and cervical adaptation: Testing craniocervical evolutionary hypotheses in Ceratopsia. Evolution, 69(7), 1728-1744
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Head size, weaponry, and cervical adaptation: Testing craniocervical evolutionary hypotheses in Ceratopsia
2015 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1728-1744Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The anterior cervical vertebrae form the skeletal connection between the cranial and postcranial skeletons in higher tetrapods. As a result, the morphology of the atlas-axis complex is likely to be shaped by selection pressures acting on either the head or neck. The neoceratopsian (Reptilia:Dinosauria) syncervical represents one of the most highly modified atlas-axis regions in vertebrates, being formed by the complete coalescence of the three most anterior cervical vertebrae. In ceratopsids, the syncervical has been hypothesized to be an adaptation to support a massive skull, or to act as a buttress during intraspecific head-to-head combat. Here, we test these functional/adaptive hypotheses within a phylogenetic framework and critically examine the previously proposed methods for quantifying relative head size in the fossil record for the first time. Results indicate that neither the evolution of cranial weaponry nor large head size correlates with the origin of cervical fusion in ceratopsians, and we, therefore, reject both adaptive hypotheses for the origin of the syncervical. Anterior cervical fusion has evolved independently in a number of amniote clades, and further research on extant groups with this peculiar anatomy is needed to understand the evolutionary basis for cervical fusion in Neoceratopsia.

Keywords
Adaptation, fossils, macroevolution, morphological evolution, paleobiology
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261473 (URN)10.1111/evo.12693 (DOI)000358503800007 ()26095296 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Dinosaur Research Institute

Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Brown, C. M., VanBuren, C. S., Larson, D. W., Brink, K. S., Campione, N. E., Vavrek, M. J. & Evans, D. C. (2015). Tooth counts through growth in diapsid reptiles: implications for interpreting individual and size-related variation in the fossil record. Journal of Anatomy, 226(4), 322-333
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tooth counts through growth in diapsid reptiles: implications for interpreting individual and size-related variation in the fossil record
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Anatomy, ISSN 0021-8782, E-ISSN 1469-7580, Vol. 226, no 4, p. 322-333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tooth counts are commonly recorded in fossil diapsid reptiles and have been used for taxonomic and phylogenetic purposes under the assumption that differences in the number of teeth are largely explained by interspecific variation. Although phylogeny is almost certainly one of the greatest factors influencing tooth count, the relative role of intraspecific variation is difficult, and often impossible, to test in the fossil record given the sample sizes available to palaeontologists and, as such, is best investigated using extant models. Intraspecific variation (largely manifested as size-related or ontogenetic variation) in tooth counts has been examined in extant squamates (lizards and snakes) but is poorly understood in archosaurs (crocodylians and dinosaurs). Here, we document tooth count variation in two species of extant crocodylians (Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus) as well as a large varanid lizard (Varanus komodoensis). We test the hypothesis that variation in tooth count is driven primarily by growth and thus predict significant correlations between tooth count and size, as well as differences in the frequency of deviation from the modal tooth count in the premaxilla, maxilla, and dentary. In addition to tooth counts, we also document tooth allometry in each species and compare these results with tooth count change through growth. Results reveal no correlation of tooth count with size in any element of any species examined here, with the exception of the premaxilla of C.porosus, which shows the loss of one tooth position. Based on the taxa examined here, we reject the hypothesis, as it is evident that variation in tooth count is not always significantly correlated with growth. However, growth trajectories of smaller reptilian taxa show increases in tooth counts and, although current samples are small, suggest potential correlates between tooth count trajectories and adult size. Nevertheless, interspecific variation in growth patterns underscores the importance of considering and understanding growth when constructing taxonomic and phylogenetic characters, in particular for fossil taxa where ontogenetic patterns are difficult to reconstruct.

Keywords
Alligator, allometry, Crocodylus, dentition, Diapsida, Dinosauria, Reptilia, Varanus
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252189 (URN)10.1111/joa.12280 (DOI)000352584400003 ()25689039 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-06 Created: 2015-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Campione, N. E., Evans, D. C., Brown, C. M. & Carrano, M. T. (2014). Body mass estimation in non-avian bipeds using a theoretical conversion to quadruped stylopodial proportions. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 5(9), 913-923
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body mass estimation in non-avian bipeds using a theoretical conversion to quadruped stylopodial proportions
2014 (English)In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2041-210X, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 913-923Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Body mass is strongly related to both physiological and ecological properties of living organisms. As a result, generating robust, broadly applicable models for estimating body mass in the fossil record provides the opportunity to reconstruct palaeobiology and investigate evolutionary ecology on a large temporal scale. A recent study provided strong evidence that the minimum circumference of stylopodial elements (humerus and femur) is conservatively associated with body mass in living quadrupeds. Unfortunately, this model is not directly applicable to extinct bipeds, such as non-avian dinosaurs. This study presents a new equation that mathematically corrects the quadruped equation for use in bipeds. It is derived from the systemic difference in the circumference-to-area scaling relationship of two circles (hypothetical quadruped) and one circle (hypothetical biped), which represent the cross-section of the main weight-bearing limb bones. When applied to a newly constructed data set of femoral circumferences and body masses in living birds, the new equation reveals errors that are significantly lower than other published equations, but significantly higher than the error inherent in the avian data set. Such errors, however, are expected given the unique overall femoral circumference-body mass scaling relationship found in birds. Body mass estimates for a sample of bipedal dinosaurs using the new model are consistent with recent estimates based on volumetric life reconstructions, but, in contrast, this equation is simpler to use, with the concomitant potential to provide a wider set of body mass estimates for extinct bipeds. Although it is evident that no one estimation model is flawless, the combined use of the corrected quadrupedal equations and the previously published quadrupedal equation offer a consistent approach with which to estimate body masses in both quadrupeds and bipeds. These models have implications for conducting large-scale macroevolutionary analyses of body size throughout the evolutionary history of terrestrial vertebrates, and, in particular, across major changes in body plan, such as the evolution of bipedality in archosaurs and quadrupedality in dinosaurs.

Keywords
body mass estimation, dinosaurian, evolutionary biology, linear models, macroevolution, software, statistics, terrestrial bipeds
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235641 (URN)10.1111/2041-210X.12226 (DOI)000342722100008 ()
Available from: 2014-11-11 Created: 2014-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Larson, D. W., Campione, N. E., Brown, C. M., Evans, D. C. & Ryan, M. J. (2014). Hadrosauroid material from the Santonian Milk River Formation of Alberta, Canada. In: David A. Eberth, David C. Evans (Ed.), Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium (pp. 136-152). Indiana University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hadrosauroid material from the Santonian Milk River Formation of Alberta, Canada
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2014 (English)In: Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium / [ed] David A. Eberth, David C. Evans, Indiana University Press, 2014, p. 136-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Indiana University Press, 2014
Series
Life of the Past
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Zoology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Organismal Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-217238 (URN)2-s2.0-84932157783 (Scopus ID)9780253013859 (ISBN)9780253013903 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-01-31 Created: 2014-01-31 Last updated: 2016-12-08Bibliographically approved
Campione, N. E. (2014). Postcranial Anatomy of Edmontosaurus regalis (Hadrosauridae) from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Alberta, Canada. In: David A. Ebert, David C. Evans (Ed.), Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium (pp. 208-244). Indiana University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postcranial Anatomy of Edmontosaurus regalis (Hadrosauridae) from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Alberta, Canada
2014 (English)In: Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium / [ed] David A. Ebert, David C. Evans, Indiana University Press, 2014, p. 208-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Indiana University Press, 2014
Series
Life of the Past
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Zoology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Organismal Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-217237 (URN)2-s2.0-84952323607 (Scopus ID)9780253013859 (ISBN)9780253013903 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-01-31 Created: 2014-01-31 Last updated: 2017-01-03Bibliographically approved
Benson, R. B. J., Campione, N. E., Carrano, M. T., Mannion, P. D., Sullivan, C., Upchurch, P. & Evans, D. C. (2014). Rates of Dinosaur Body Mass Evolution Indicate 170 Million Years of Sustained Ecological Innovation on the Avian Stem Lineage. PLoS biology, 12(5), e1001853
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rates of Dinosaur Body Mass Evolution Indicate 170 Million Years of Sustained Ecological Innovation on the Avian Stem Lineage
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2014 (English)In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 12, no 5, p. e1001853-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Large-scale adaptive radiations might explain the runaway success of a minority of extant vertebrate clades. This hypothesis predicts, among other things, rapid rates of morphological evolution during the early history of major groups, as lineages invade disparate ecological niches. However, few studies of adaptive radiation have included deep time data, so the links between extant diversity and major extinct radiations are unclear. The intensively studied Mesozoic dinosaur record provides a model system for such investigation, representing an ecologically diverse group that dominated terrestrial ecosystems for 170 million years. Furthermore, with 10,000 species, extant dinosaurs (birds) are the most speciose living tetrapod clade. We assembled composite trees of 614-622 Mesozoic dinosaurs/birds, and a comprehensive body mass dataset using the scaling relationship of limb bone robustness. Maximum-likelihood modelling and the node height test reveal rapid evolutionary rates and a predominance of rapid shifts among size classes in early (Triassic) dinosaurs. This indicates an early burst niche-filling pattern and contrasts with previous studies that favoured gradualistic rates. Subsequently, rates declined in most lineages, which rarely exploited new ecological niches. However, feathered maniraptoran dinosaurs (including Mesozoic birds) sustained rapid evolution from at least the Middle Jurassic, suggesting that these taxa evaded the effects of niche saturation. This indicates that a long evolutionary history of continuing ecological innovation paved the way for a second great radiation of dinosaurs, in birds. We therefore demonstrate links between the predominantly extinct deep time adaptive radiation of non-avian dinosaurs and the phenomenal diversification of birds, via continuing rapid rates of evolution along the phylogenetic stem lineage. This raises the possibility that the uneven distribution of biodiversity results not just from large-scale extrapolation of the process of adaptive radiation in a few extant clades, but also from the maintenance of evolvability on vast time scales across the history of life, in key lineages.

National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228492 (URN)10.1371/journal.pbio.1001853 (DOI)000336969200004 ()
Available from: 2014-07-15 Created: 2014-07-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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