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Vadlin, Sofia
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Vadlin, S., Åslund, C. & Nillson, K. W. (2018). A longitudinal study of the individual- and group-level problematic gaming and associations with problem gambling among Swedish adolescents. Brain and Behavior, 8(4), Article ID e00949.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of the individual- and group-level problematic gaming and associations with problem gambling among Swedish adolescents
2018 (English)In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e00949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:  The aims of the present study were to investigate the long-term stability of problematic gaming among adolescents and whether problematic gaming at wave 1 (W1) was associated with problem gambling at wave 2 (W2), three years later.

Methods:  Data from the SALVe cohort, including adolescents in Västmanland born in 1997 and 1999, were accessed and analyzed in two waves W2, N = 1576; 914 (58%) girls). At W1 the adolescents were 13 and 15 years old, and at W2 they were 16 and 18 years old. Adolescents self-rated on the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT), Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI), and gambling frequencies. Stability of gaming was determined using Gamma correlation, Spearman’s rho, and McNemar. Logistic regression analysis and General linear model (GLM) analysis were performed and adjusted for sex, age, and ethnicity, frequency of gambling activities and gaming time at W1, with PGSI as the dependent variable, and GAIT as the independent variable, to investigate associations between problematic gaming and problem gambling.

Results:  Problematic gaming was relative stable over time, g = 0.739, P £ 0.001, r = 0.555, P £ 0.001, and McNemar P £ 0.001. Furthermore, problematic gaming at W1 increased the probability of having problem gambling three years later, logistic regression OR = 1.886 (95% CI 1.125-3.161), P = 0.016, GLM F = 10.588, h2 = 0.007, P = 0.001.  

Conclusions: Problematic gaming seems to be relatively stable over time. Although associations between problematic gaming and later problem gambling were found, the low explained variance indicate that problematic gaming in an unlikely predictor for problem gambling within this sample.

Keywords
Adolescence, behavioral addiction, comorbidity, gaming problems, gambling problems
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychology
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352513 (URN)10.1002/brb3.949 (DOI)000429700300014 ()
Projects
SALVe Cohort
Funder
Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Torres Soler, C., Olofsdotter, S., Vadlin, S., Ramklint, M., Nilsson, K. W. & Sonnby, K. (2018). Diagnostic accuracy of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale parent report among adolescent psychiatric outpatients. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 72(3), 184-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnostic accuracy of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale parent report among adolescent psychiatric outpatients
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2018 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 184-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The diagnostic accuracy of the parent report of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-P) for the screening of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents has not been evaluated.

AIM: The aim was to explore the psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the MADRS-P in general child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient services in Sweden.

METHOD: The study was a validation and a diagnostic accuracy study. Consecutive adolescent psychiatric patients (n = 101, 45 males, mean age 15 years) were assessed with a diagnostic interview, the Kiddie Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children - Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL), as a reference test. Thereafter, their parents reported on the MADRS-P. Both categorical MDD diagnoses and dimensional MDD symptom severity scores were obtained from the K-SADS-PL.

RESULTS: The internal consistency of the MADRS-P, measured with Cronbach's alpha, was 0.846. The concurrent validity, assessed by Spearman's rho as a correlation between the K-SADS MDD symptom severity score and the MADRS-P score, was 0.580. The area under the curve in a receiver operating characteristic analysis for all participants was 0.786 (95% confidence interval 0.694-0.877, p < .001). At a cut-off of 10, sensitivity was 0.86, specificity 0.54, positive predictive value 0.59 and negative predictive value 0.84.

CONCLUSIONS: The parent-rated MADRS-P showed similar psychometric properties as previously shown for the self-rated MADRS-S in adults. Although the MADRS-P has acceptable diagnostic accuracy for screening for MDD in adolescents in a general psychiatric setting, it cannot be used alone for diagnosing MDD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Depression, adolescents, parents, questionnaire, validation study
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342265 (URN)10.1080/08039488.2017.1414873 (DOI)000424948600005 ()29258381 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-04-10Bibliographically approved
Vadlin, S., Åslund, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2017). Stability of problematic gaming and associations with problematic gambling: A three-year follow-up study of adolescents in the SALVe-cohort. European psychiatry, 41, S882-S882
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stability of problematic gaming and associations with problematic gambling: A three-year follow-up study of adolescents in the SALVe-cohort
2017 (English)In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 41, p. S882-S882Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335825 (URN)10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.01.1782 (DOI)000404952600845 ()
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved
Olofsdotter, S., Vadlin, S., Sonnby, K., Furmark, T. & Nilsson, K. W. (2016). Anxiety disorders among adolescents referred to general psychiatry for multiple causes: clinical presentation, prevalence, and comorbidity. Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, 4(2), 55-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety disorders among adolescents referred to general psychiatry for multiple causes: clinical presentation, prevalence, and comorbidity
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2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, E-ISSN 2245-8875, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reports of anxiety disorder characteristics among youth in clinical settings typically include descriptions of patients who have been specifically referred for anxiety treatment. At odds with a large body of evidence which demonstrates these disorders to be most common among young people, prevalence studies in samples referred to general psychiatry for multiple causes are scarce and report highly discrepant estimates.

For this study and regardless of their presenting symptoms, 125 adolescents (57.6% girls) between the ages of 12 and 18 years who were consecutively referred to two child and adolescent general psychiatry clinics in Sweden were assessed for anxiety disorders and comorbidity using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children. Self-ratings of anxiety symptoms and difficulties with family, school, friends, sleep, and body aches were also obtained.

At least one anxiety disorder was found in 46% of participants. Among anxious adolescents, homotypic comorbidity (concurrent anxiety) was observed in 43%, and heterotypic comorbidity (concurrent non-anxiety psychiatric disorders) was observed in 91%. No comorbidity was observed in 5%. Trauma, ache, and difficulties making friends were more common among anxious adolescents as compared with psychiatrically referred adolescents without anxiety.

The finding that only 21% of adolescents diagnosed with anxiety disorders were referred for anxiety further supports the routine use of standardized and structured instruments—irrespective of referral cause—to improve both precision and detection rates in the clinical setting. Comprehensive assessments are of utmost importance to fully address the complexity of the symptoms in this patient group.

National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323571 (URN)10.21307/sjcapp-2016-010 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Olofsdotter, S., Sonnby, K., Vadlin, S., Furmark, T. & Nilsson, K. W. (2016). Assessing Adolescent Anxiety in General Psychiatric Care: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Swedish Self-Report and Parent Versions of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale. Assessment (Odessa, Fla.), 23(6), 744-757
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Adolescent Anxiety in General Psychiatric Care: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Swedish Self-Report and Parent Versions of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale
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2016 (English)In: Assessment (Odessa, Fla.), ISSN 1073-1911, E-ISSN 1552-3489, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 744-757Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the Swedish translations of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, self- and parent report versions, in a sample of 104 adolescents presenting at two general psychiatric outpatient units. Results showed high informant agreement and good internal reliability and concurrent and discriminant validity for both versions and demonstrated that this scale can distinguish between adolescents with and without an anxiety disorder in a non-anxiety-specific clinical setting. The relative clinical utility of different cutoff scores was compared by looking at the extent to which dichotomized questionnaire results altered the pretest probability of the presence of a diagnosis as defined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children. Optimized for screening and diagnostic purposes in Sweden, cutoff scores obtained in the current study outperformed a previously identified cutoff score derived from an Australian community sample. The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale is a useful clinical instrument for the assessment of anxiety in adolescents.

Keywords
anxiety disorders, adolescents, Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, test validity, diagnostic accuracy
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252419 (URN)10.1177/1073191115583858 (DOI)000388676500008 ()25934162 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-06 Created: 2015-05-06 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Vadlin, S., Åslund, C., Hellström, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2016). Associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents in two samples. Addictive Behaviours, 61, 8-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents in two samples
2016 (English)In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 61, p. 8-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents. Data from adolescents in the SALVe cohort, including adolescents in Vastmanland who were born in 1997 and 1999 (N = 1868; 1034 girls), and data from consecutive adolescent psychiatric outpatients in Vastmanland (N = 242; 169 girls) were analyzed. Adolescents self-rated on the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT), Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Adolescent version (ASRS-A), Depression Self-Rating Scale Adolescent version (DSRS-A), Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS), and psychotic-like experiences (PLEs). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed, and adjusted for sex, age, study population, school bullying, family maltreatment, and interactions by sex, with two-way interactions between psychiatric measurements. Boys had higher self-rated problematic gaming in both samples, whereas girls self-rated higher in all psychiatric domains. Boys had more than eight times the probability, odds ratio (OR), of having problematic gaming. Symptoms of ADHD, depression and anxiety were associated with ORs of 2.43 (95% CI 1.44-4.11), 2.47 (95% CI 1.44-4.25), and 2.06 (95% CI 1.27-333), respectively, in relation to coexisting problematic gaming. Problematic gaming was associated with psychiatric symptoms in adolescents; when problematic gaming is considered, the probability of coexisting psychiatric symptoms should also be considered, and vice versa.

Keywords
Problematic gaming, Gaming addiction, ADHD, Depression, Anxiety, Psychotic-like experiences
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychiatry Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300426 (URN)10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.05.001 (DOI)000379630700002 ()27203825 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain Foundation, F02015-0315Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Åke Wiberg Foundation
Available from: 2016-08-09 Created: 2016-08-09 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Sjölander, L., Vadlin, S., Olofsdotter, S. & Sonnby, K. (2016). Validation of the parent version of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale for adolescents.. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 70(4), 255-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the parent version of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale for adolescents.
2016 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 255-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the validity of a parent version of the World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Self-Report Scale for adolescents (ASRS-AP) and the 6-question screening version (ASRS-AP-S).

METHODS: Adolescent psychiatric outpatients (N = 112, mean age 15 years, 40% boys) and their parents were interviewed with the Kiddie Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS), and the parents reported on the ASRS-AP/ASRS-AP-S.

RESULTS: Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.93 for ASRS-AP and 0.85 for ASRS-AP-S, 0.91 and 0.87 for the inattention subscale, and 0.91 and 0.72 for the hyperactivity subscale, respectively. The concurrent validity (Spearman's correlation coefficient) between the total K-SADS ADHD symptom severity score and the sum of the score on the ASRS-AP/ASRS-AP-S was 0.75 and 0.66, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy measures for the ASRS-AP and ASRS-AP-S were 78% and 80% sensitivity, 75% and 74% specificity, 73% and 71% positive predictive value (PPV), and 81% and 82% negative predictive value (NPV), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: The ASRS-AP and ASRS-AP-S showed high internal consistency and concurrent validity in relation to total K-SADS ADHD symptom severity score. Both scales showed favourable diagnostic accuracy measures.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281760 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2015.1085092 (DOI)000373021800003 ()26624978 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Vadlin, S., Åslund, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2015). Development and content validity of a screening instrument for gaming addiction in adolescents: The Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT). Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(4), 458-466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and content validity of a screening instrument for gaming addiction in adolescents: The Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT)
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 458-466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study describes the development of a screening tool for gaming addiction in adolescents - the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT). Its development was based on the research literature on gaming and addiction. An expert panel comprising professional raters (n=7), experiential adolescent raters (n=10), and parent raters (n=10) estimated the content validity of each item (I-CVI) as well as of the whole scale (S-CVI/Ave), and participated in a cognitive interview about the GAIT scale. The mean scores for both I-CVI and S-CVI/Ave ranged between 0.97 and 0.99 compared with the lowest recommended I-CVI value of 0.78 and the S-CVI/Ave value of 0.90. There were no sex differences and no differences between expert groups regarding ratings in content validity. No differences in the overall evaluation of the scale emerged in the cognitive interviews. Our conclusions were that GAIT showed good content validity in capturing gaming addiction. The GAIT needs further investigation into its psychometric properties of construct validity (convergent and divergent validity) and criterion-related validity, as well as its reliability in both clinical settings and in community settings with adolescents.

Keywords
Addiction, adolescence, computer gaming, Internet gaming disorder, psychometry, video gaming
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260283 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12196 (DOI)000358042800012 ()25615802 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Svenska Spel Research Council, The Uppsala and Orebro Regional Research Council, Fredrik and Ingrid Thurings Foundation, the County Council of Vastmanland, Konig-Soderstromska foundation, The Swedish Psychiatric Foundation, and The Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (FAS)

Available from: 2015-08-21 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2016-10-04
Vadlin, S., Åslund, C., Rehn, M. & Nilsson, K. W. (2015). Psychometric evaluation of the adolescent and parent versions of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT). Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(6), 726-735
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation of the adolescent and parent versions of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT)
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 726-735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT) and its parent version (GAIT-P), in a representative community sample of adolescents and parents in Vastmanland, Sweden. Self-rated and parent-rated gaming addictive symptoms identified by GAIT and GAIT-P were analyzed for frequency of endorsement, internal consistency, concordance, factor structure, prevalence of Internet gaming disorder (IGD), concurrence with the Gaming Addiction Scale for Adolescents, 7-item version (GAS) and the parent version of GAS (GAS-P), and for sex differences. The 12-month prevalence of IGD was found to be 1.3% with GAIT and 2.4% with GAIT-P. Results also indicate promising psychometric results within this population, with high internal consistency, and high concurrent validity with GAS and GAS-P. Concordance between adolescents and parents ratings was high, although moderate in girls. Although exploratory factor analysis indicated poor model fit, it also indicated unidimensionality and high factor loadings in all analyses. GAIT and GAIT-P are suitable for continued use in measuring gaming addiction in adolescents, and, with the additional two items, they now cover all nine IGD criteria.

Keywords
Psychometric, adolescent, gaming addiction, IGD, DSM-5
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269967 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12250 (DOI)000365031100017 ()26440139 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2015-12-19 Created: 2015-12-19 Last updated: 2016-10-04
Sonnby, K., Skordas, K., Olofsdotter, S., Vadlin, S., Nilsson, K. W. & Ramklint, M. (2015). Validation of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale for adolescents. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 69(3), 216-223
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale for adolescents
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2015 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 216-223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self Report Scale (ASRS) is a widely used diagnostic tool for assessment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in clinical psychiatry in Sweden. The ASRS consists of 18 questions, the first six of which can be used as a short screening version (ASRS-S). There is a version for adolescents—ASRS-Adolescent (ASRS-A)—and the corresponding screening version (ASRS-A-S), which has not been validated to date.

Aim: The aim was to validate the ASRS-A and the ASRS-A-S for use in adolescent clinical populations.

Methods: Adolescent psychiatric outpatients (n = 134, mean age 15 years, 40% boys) reported on the ASRS-A, and were interviewed with the Kiddie Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS), a semi-structured interview, together with a parent.

Results: Internal consistency was 0.79 for the ASRS-A-S and 0.92 for the ASRS-A (Cronbach's alpha). Internal consistency values were 0.79 and 0.87 for the inattention subscale, and 0.68 and 0.89 for the hyperactivity subscale, respectively. Concurrent validity values, measured with Spearman's correlation coefficient, between the total K-SADS ADHD symptom severity score and the sum of ASRS-A-S and ASRS-A total scores were 0.51 and 0.60, respectively. Psychometric properties of the ASRS-A-S and the ASRS-A were: sensitivity 74% and 79%; negative predictive value 81% and 84%; specificity 59% and 60%; and positive predictive value 49% and 51%, respectively. Both versions showed better properties for girls than for boys.

Conclusion: Both the ASRS-A-S and the ASRS-A showed promising psychometric properties for use in adolescent clinical populations.

Keywords
Validation Study, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Adolescent
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219112 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2014.968203 (DOI)000351231500009 ()25348323 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-21 Created: 2014-02-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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