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Torbakov, Igor, Dr.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Torbakov, I. (2018). After Empire: Nationalist Imagination and Symbolic Politics in Russia and Eurasia in the Twentieth and Twenty First Century. Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>After Empire: Nationalist Imagination and Symbolic Politics in Russia and Eurasia in the Twentieth and Twenty First Century
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018. p. 260
Series
Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, ISSN 1614-3515 ; 191
National Category
History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371593 (URN)9783838212173 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2018). Celebrating Red October: A Story of the Ten Anniversaries of the Russian Revolution, 1927-2017. Scando-Slavica, 64(1), 7-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Celebrating Red October: A Story of the Ten Anniversaries of the Russian Revolution, 1927-2017
2018 (English)In: Scando-Slavica, ISSN 0080-6765, E-ISSN 1600-082X, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 7-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This essay seeks to shed light on how the constantly evolving Soviet system shaped and reshaped the myth of Red October and how post-Soviet ruling elites treated the memory surrounding the 1917 Russian Revolution while pursuing political ends. At the center of the analysis are the politics of history and commemorative practices of the past ten decades, with the demise of communist ideology and the breakup of the Soviet Union serving as clear rupture points. Through its focus on revolutionary jubilees, the essay traces the trajectory of attitudes towards the Revolution over the past one hundred years - from treating Red October as a foundation myth for the entire Soviet era to viewing it as an inconvenient event that does not fit easily into the essentially counter-revolutionary official narrative of contemporary Russia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Russian Revolution, Soviet festivals, commemoration, politics of history
National Category
History of Ideas History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-353192 (URN)10.1080/00806765.2018.1447820 (DOI)000430429600003 ()
Available from: 2018-06-12 Created: 2018-06-12 Last updated: 2018-06-12Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2018). 'Middle Continent' or 'Island Russia': Eurasianist Legacy and Vadim Tsymburskii’s Revisionist Geopolitics. In: Niklas Bernsand and Barbara Törnquist-Plewa (Ed.), Cultural and Political Imaginaries in Putin’s Russia: (pp. 37-62). Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Middle Continent' or 'Island Russia': Eurasianist Legacy and Vadim Tsymburskii’s Revisionist Geopolitics
2018 (English)In: Cultural and Political Imaginaries in Putin’s Russia / [ed] Niklas Bernsand and Barbara Törnquist-Plewa, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, p. 37-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018
National Category
History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371587 (URN)10.1163/9789004366671_004 (DOI)978-90-04-36667-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2018). Paradoxe Familienähnlichkeit: Russland, die Türkei und die Grenzen ihrer Allianz. Osteuropa: Zeitschrift für Gegenwartsfragen des Ostens, 68(10-12), 95-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paradoxe Familienähnlichkeit: Russland, die Türkei und die Grenzen ihrer Allianz
2018 (German)In: Osteuropa: Zeitschrift für Gegenwartsfragen des Ostens, ISSN 0030-6428, Vol. 68, no 10-12, p. 95-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At first glance, Russia and Turkey resemble twins. They have an imperial heritage, the nation building process has not yet been completed, and modernisation has occurred through state mobilisation. Their relationship with Europe is also ambivalent. The authoritarian regimes appear to be ideal alliance partners. Yet in reality, this is far from true. Their current joint appearance belies the fact that they are pursuing different interests in their shared regional environment, where they have become competitors due to the ongoing imperialist nature of their strategic culture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BWV-BERLINER WISSENSCHAFTS-VERLAG GMBH, 2018
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381934 (URN)000462253400005 ()
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2017). Defining the ‘True’ Nationalism: Russian Ethnic Nationalists vs. Eurasianists. In: Mark Bassin and Gonzalo Pozo (Ed.), The Politics of Eurasianism: Identity, Popular Culture and Russia’s Foreign Policy (pp. 19-38). London: Rowman & Littlefield International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defining the ‘True’ Nationalism: Russian Ethnic Nationalists vs. Eurasianists
2017 (English)In: The Politics of Eurasianism: Identity, Popular Culture and Russia’s Foreign Policy / [ed] Mark Bassin and Gonzalo Pozo, London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017, p. 19-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017
National Category
History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371601 (URN)9781786601629 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2017). Neo-Ottomanism versus Neo-Eurasianism?: Nationalism and Symbolic Geography in Postimperial Turkey and Russia. Mediterranean Quarterly, 28(2), 125-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neo-Ottomanism versus Neo-Eurasianism?: Nationalism and Symbolic Geography in Postimperial Turkey and Russia
2017 (English)In: Mediterranean Quarterly, ISSN 1047-4552, E-ISSN 1527-1935, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 125-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Duke University Press, 2017
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342105 (URN)10.1215/10474552-4164303 (DOI)000422806000007 ()
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2017). Russia-Europe Relations in Historical Perspective: Investigating the Role of Ukraine. Insight Turkey, 19(4), 69-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Russia-Europe Relations in Historical Perspective: Investigating the Role of Ukraine
2017 (English)In: Insight Turkey, ISSN 1302-177X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 69-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There seems to be a consensus within both Russian and European analytic communities as to the ultimate reason behind the dramatic deterioration of Russia-EU relations over the last three years. This reason boils down to a single word: Ukraine. This essay intends to investigate a two-pronged question: 1) how the differing, quasi-imperial natures of Russia and the EU make it hard for them to find an accommodation in their shared neighborhood and 2) how the recent EU-Russia dynamics prompted Moscow's policy elite to re-conceptualize Russia as a distinct civilization, apart from Europe. While exploring these issues, the essay will maintain a special focus on Ukraine whose role in the Russia-Europe relationship has historically been and continues to be pivotal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ankara: , 2017
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338922 (URN)10.25253/99.2017194.05 (DOI)000446418100006 ()
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2016). Managing Imperial Peripheries: Russia and China in Central Asia. In: Tom Fingar (Ed.), The New Great Game: China and South and Central Asia in the Era of Reforms. Stanford: Stanford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing Imperial Peripheries: Russia and China in Central Asia
2016 (English)In: The New Great Game: China and South and Central Asia in the Era of Reforms / [ed] Tom Fingar, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2016
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371606 (URN)9780804796040 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2016). Ukraine and Russia: Entangled Histories, Contested Identities and a War of Narratives. In: Olga Bertelsen (Ed.), Revolution and War in Contemporary Ukraine: The Challenge of Change (pp. 89-120). Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ukraine and Russia: Entangled Histories, Contested Identities and a War of Narratives
2016 (English)In: Revolution and War in Contemporary Ukraine: The Challenge of Change / [ed] Olga Bertelsen, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2016, p. 89-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2016
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371604 (URN)9783838210568 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Torbakov, I. (2015). A Parting of Ways?: The Kremlin Leadership and Russia’s New-Generation Nationalist Thinkers. Demokratizatsiya, 23(4), 427-457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Parting of Ways?: The Kremlin Leadership and Russia’s New-Generation Nationalist Thinkers
2015 (English)In: Demokratizatsiya, ISSN 1074-6846, E-ISSN 1940-4603, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 427-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article focuses on what appears to be a turning point in the complex relationship between the political leadership of post-Soviet Russia and the new generation of Russian nationalists, who are increasingly setting the tone in the nationalist movement. My objective is to explore how this nationalist “New Wave” critiques the Russian nationalist tradition – not least the relationship between Russian nationalism and the Russian state – and to discuss nationalists’ views on how Russian nationalism should be reinvigorated so that it can become a truly influential popular movement. I argue that the moral and political revulsion of nationalist thinkers at the Kremlin’s attempt to masquerade as a nationalist force marks a crucial watershed in contemporary Russian history – namely, a definitive parting of ways between the new-generation democratic-oriented Russian nationalists and the Kremlin leadership.

National Category
History History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338933 (URN)
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved
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