uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Arinell, Hans
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Alaie, I., Philipson, A., Ssegonja, R., Hagberg, L., Feldman, I., Sampaio, F., . . . Jonsson, U. (2019). Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study (ULADS). BMJ Open, 9(3), Article ID e024939.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study (ULADS)
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e024939Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To present the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Uppsala, Sweden, in the early 1990s. The initial aim of this epidemiological investigation was to study the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of adolescent depression, and has subsequently expanded to include a broad range of social, economic and health-related long-term outcomes and cost-of-illness analyses.

Participants: The source population was first-year students (aged 16-17) in upper-secondary schools in Uppsala during 1991-1992, of which 2300 (93%) were screened for depression. Adolescents with positive screening and sex/age-matched peers were invited to a comprehensive assessment. A total of 631 adolescents (78% females) completed this assessment, and 409 subsequently completed a 15year follow-up assessment. At both occasions, extensive information was collected on mental disorders, personality and psychosocial situation. Detailed social, economic and health-related data from 1993 onwards have recently been obtained from the Swedish national registries for 576 of the original participants and an age-matched reference population (N=200 000).

Findings to date: The adolescent lifetime prevalence of a major depressive episode was estimated to be 11.4%. Recurrence in young adulthood was reported by the majority, with a particularly poor prognosis for those with a persistent depressive disorder or multiple somatic symptoms. Adolescent depression was also associated with an increased risk of other adversities in adulthood, including additional mental health conditions, low educational attainment and problems related to intimate relationships.

Future plans: Longitudinal studies of adolescent depression are rare and must be responsibly managed and utilised. We therefore intend to follow the cohort continuously by means of registries. Currently, the participants are approaching mid-adulthood. At this stage, we are focusing on the overall long-term burden of adolescent depression. For this purpose, the research group has incorporated expertise in health economics. We would also welcome extended collaboration with researchers managing similar datasets.

National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389609 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024939 (DOI)000471144900167 ()30826765 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-10092Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareStiftelsen Söderström - Königska sjukhemmet
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved
Folke, F., Hursti, T., Kanter, J. W., Arinell, H., Tungström, S., Söderberg, P. & Ekselius, L. (2018). Exploring the relationship between activities and emotional experience using a diary in a mental health inpatient setting.. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27(1), 276-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the relationship between activities and emotional experience using a diary in a mental health inpatient setting.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental health inpatient milieus have repeatedly been found to be associated with passivity, social disengagement, and low levels of interaction with staff. However, little is known about patients' experiences related to different ward activities. In the present study, we aimed to study the reports of activities and associated experiences of patients admitted to acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Disengaged, inactive, and solitary activities were hypothesized to be associated with less reward and more distress than their counterparts. We also aimed to investigate if such activities predicted distress, and if they were associated with clinical severity. Participants (n = 102) recorded their activities along with concurrent ratings of reward and distress in a structured 1-day diary, and nurses provided clinical severity ratings. On average, 3.74 of the 11 hours assessed (34%) were spent doing nothing, only 0.88 hours (8%) were spent with staff, and most of the time was spent in solitude. Doing nothing, being alone, and passivity were associated with the greatest levels of distress and lowest levels of reward, whereas informal socializing demonstrated the opposite pattern. Distress was not predicted by activity or reward when adjusting for baseline distress. Clinical severity was not associated with the amount of time spent alone or the experience of reward during activity. In conclusion, the risk for passivity and social disengagement during admission prevails. This activity pattern could have detrimental emotional consequences and warrants action, but more studies are needed to determine if activity actually precedes emotional experience.

Keywords
activity, diary, hospitalized, mental health inpatient, reward
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330226 (URN)10.1111/inm.12318 (DOI)000419717100027 ()28220616 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Nehlin, C., Arinell, H., Dyster-Aas, J. & Jess, K. (2017). Alcohol Habits and Health Care Use in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders. Journal of dual diagnosis, 13(4), 247-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol Habits and Health Care Use in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders
2017 (English)In: Journal of dual diagnosis, ISSN 1530-3209, E-ISSN 1550-4271, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 247-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: It is common for persons with psychiatric disorders to also have alcohol problems. Studies in the general population as well as in clinical samples have found hazardous or harmful alcohol habits to be particularly prevalent in the presence of psychiatric disorders. This study sought to explore the relationships between drinking habits and health care utilization (psychiatric as well as general medical) in persons seeking psychiatric treatment and to investigate the associations among age, sex, and type or number of diagnoses and health care use and costs. For the planning of targeted interventions, we also sought to identify subgroups with a high prevalence of hazardous drinking habits.

METHODS: From a psychiatric clinic for affective disorders at a university hospital in Sweden, patients who had been screened for hazardous drinking (N = 609) were selected. Patients with primary psychosis or substance use disorder receive treatment at other clinics and did not participate. Medical records data were grouped and compared. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10) was used for diagnoses and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for screening. Patients were grouped by drinking habits and sex, age, and diagnosis group, and their psychiatric as well as general medical health care use was compared.

RESULTS: Abstainers used psychiatric care more than all other drinking groups (p < .001). Psychiatric health care costs were higher in abstainers and low-risk drinkers (1.64 to 1). No differences in general medical care could be identified between drinking groups. Specific subgroups with higher rates of hazardous drinking could not be identified (44% of all males and 34% of all females reported such habits). Inconclusive results from previous research are most likely due to different methods used to classify drinking problems.

CONCLUSIONS: Abstainers and low-risk drinkers used psychiatric health care to a higher cost than the other drinking groups. Possible explanations are discussed from a clinical and scientific perspective. This study clarifies the need for uniform measures when classifying alcohol use in studies of relationships between alcohol use and health care use. There is also a need to separate former drinkers from abstainers in future studies.

Keywords
Drinking habits, health care use, psychiatric treatment
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330153 (URN)10.1080/15504263.2017.1347307 (DOI)000423373400003 ()28665254 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Öster, C., Arinell, H. & Nehlin, C. (2017). The Drinking Motives Questionnaire among Swedish psychiatric patients: An exploration of the four-factor structure. Drug and Alcohol Review, 36(3), 400-407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Drinking Motives Questionnaire among Swedish psychiatric patients: An exploration of the four-factor structure
2017 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 400-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Aims: Alcohol use above hazardous limits is common among persons with psychiatric disorders, and there is limited knowledge about motives for drinking. The objective of this study was to explore the adequacy of the four-factor structure of drinking motives in an adult psychiatric outpatient population in Sweden by confirming the factor structure in the Drinking Motives Questionnaire (DMQ-R) and in alternative models.

Design and Methods: In total, 371 patients responded to the DMQ-R along with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). AUDIT was used to assess frequency of alcohol consumption, number of drinks consumed on a typical occasion and binge drinking frequency. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of the DMQ-R and alternative models, including the short form, DMQ-R SF.

Results: Fit statistics suggested that the original four-factor model had questionable fit (root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA]=0.10, comparative fit index [CFI]=0.89, standardised root mean square residual [SRMR]=0.08). The model with the best fit indices was the DMQ-R SF (RMSEA=0.07, CFI=0.97, SRMR=0.04). When using DMQ-R SF in further analyses enhancement, the most strongly endorsed motives were related to quantity and AUDIT sum score. Coping motives were most strongly related to AUDIT sum score, frequency and binge drinking. Social motives were only related to binge drinking, whereas conformity motives were not statistically associated with any motives.

Discussion and Conclusions: The study implies that the 12-item short form, DMQ-R SF, could be more appropriate than the original DMQ-R in this group.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310964 (URN)10.1111/dar.12421 (DOI)000401238500015 ()27288296 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2017-06-22Bibliographically approved
Sveen, J., Arnberg, F., Arinell, H. & Johannesson, K. B. (2016). The role of personality traits in trajectories of long-term posttraumatic stress and general distress six years after the tsunami in Southeast Asia. Personality and Individual Differences, 97, 134-139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of personality traits in trajectories of long-term posttraumatic stress and general distress six years after the tsunami in Southeast Asia
2016 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 97, p. 134-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims were to examine whether trajectories of posttraumatic stress (PTS) and general distress are related to personality traits and to investigate personality's contributing factor to PTS and general distress. The sample was 2549 Swedish tourists who survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and responded to postal surveys at 1, 3 and 6 years after the tsunami, including assessment of personality traits, PTS and general distress. The sample was categorized into a direct exposure group and an indirect exposure comparison group. For both PTS and general distress, individuals with a resilient trajectory were lower in the trait neuroticism than those in the symptomatic trajectories whereas there were no differences in personality traits between the resilient trajectory and the low exposure comparison group. Neuroticism was strongly related to trajectories of both PTS and general distress even when adjusting for important risk factors such as traumatic bereavement and exposure severity. Other personality traits demonstrated weak associations with the trajectories. The present findings correspond with the notion of neuroticism as a vulnerability factor for symptomatic long-term trajectories of posttraumatic and general distress whereas resiliency was not predicated by particularly low levels of neuroticism.

Keywords
Personality, Posttraumatic stress, Neuroticism, Disaster, Distress, Mental health, Long-term follow-up
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298054 (URN)10.1016/j.paid.2016.03.046 (DOI)000375813700023 ()
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, 44676/2012
Available from: 2016-07-05 Created: 2016-06-29 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Swartz, J., Lindblad, F., Arinell, H., Theorell, T. & Alm, J. (2015). Anthroposophic lifestyle and salivary cortisol are associated with a lower risk of sensitization during childhood. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 26(2), 153-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anthroposophic lifestyle and salivary cortisol are associated with a lower risk of sensitization during childhood
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Infants from anthroposophic families have low cortisol levels and low risk of IgE-sensitization during first 2 years of life. Our aim is to study the impact of an anthroposophic lifestyle and cortisol levels at 6 months on allergy sensitization up to age 5 years.

Methods

507 families participated from maternal health care centers. Parental lifestyle was categorized as Anthroposophic, Partly anthroposophic or Non-anthroposophic. Blood samples for analyzes of sensitization were obtained from parents at inclusion and from children at 6, 12, 24 and 60 months. Salivary samples were collected at home at 6 months.

Results

Sensitization increased from 2.9 to 26.0% in the anthroposophic group, from 8.4 to 26.8% in the partly anthroposophic group and from 19.1 to 44.1% in the non-anthroposophic group. Children from anthroposophic families had lower cortisol levels in the morning, afternoon and evening. The odds ratio (OR) for anthroposophic lifestyle was always <1 and lowest at 12 months (OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.03-0.36). Adjusting for cortisol levels at 6 months increased these ORs at 12 and 24 months. At the same ages ORs for sensitization were elevated also for cortisol levels at 6 months. Analyzes in children not sensitized at 6 months confirmed the cortisol-related risk of sensitization.

Conclusions

Children from families with an anthroposophic lifestyle have lower risk than comparisons of developing sensitization up to 5 years. This risk is partially explained by low cortisol levels during infancy. High cortisol levels at 6 months predict sensitization up to 24 months.

National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221953 (URN)10.1111/pai.12342 (DOI)000351626800011 ()
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Bergh Johannesson, K., Arinell, H. & Arnberg, F. (2015). Six years after the wave: Trajectories of posttraumatic stress following a natural disaster. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 36, 15-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Six years after the wave: Trajectories of posttraumatic stress following a natural disaster
2015 (English)In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 36, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The characteristics of long-term trajectories of distress after disasters are unclear, since few studies include a comparison group. This study examines trajectories of recovery among survivors in comparison to individuals with indirect exposure.

Methods

Postal surveys were sent to Swedish tourists, repatriated from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (= 2268), at 1, 3, and 6 years after the tsunami to assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) and poor mental health. Items were used to ascertain high and moderate disaster exposure groups and an indirect exposure comparison group.

Results

Long-term PTS trajectories were best characterized by a resilient (72.3%), a severe chronic (4.6%), a moderate chronic (11.2%) and a recovering (11.9%) trajectory. Trajectories reported higher levels of PTS than the comparison group. Exposure severity and bereavement were highly influential risk factors.

Conclusions

These findings have implications regarding anticipation of long-term psychological adjustment after natural disasters and need for interventions after a single traumatic event with few secondary stressors.

Keywords
Posttraumatic stress; PTSD; Trajectories; Natural disaster; Longitudinal study; Recovery; General mental health
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-263212 (URN)10.1016/j.janxdis.2015.07.007 (DOI)000366226600003 ()26401968 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, 44676/2012
Available from: 2015-09-28 Created: 2015-09-28 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Thurfjell, B., Edlund, B., Arinell, H., Hägglöf, B., Garner, D. M. & Engström, I. (2004). Eating Disorder Inventory for Children (EDI-C): Effects of age and gender in a Swedish sample. European eating disorders review, 12(4), 256-264
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eating Disorder Inventory for Children (EDI-C): Effects of age and gender in a Swedish sample
Show others...
2004 (English)In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 256-264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To evaluate the Swedish version of the Eating Disorder Inventory for Children (EDI-C) from a gender and developmental perspective and to provide normative data.

Methods

Data were collected within seven cross-sectional projects. Completed questionnaires, from 2070 boys and 2655 girls in grades 4–12, were included.

Results

The psychometric properties of EDI-C in non-clinical groups of girls and adolescent boys resemble those found for adolescent girls with an eating disorder. Significant differences were found between genders, grades and pre-adolescent and adolescent groups. An increase in drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction and problems with interoceptive awareness and impulse regulation characterized the adolescent girls. Maturity fears, interpersonal distrust and social insecurity decreased during adolescence for both genders.

Conclusions

The results indicate that the EDI-C could well be used for both boys and girls, although separate norms are recommended for pre-adolescents and adolescents as well as for boys and girls.

National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93770 (URN)10.1002/erv.583 (DOI)
Available from: 2005-11-16 Created: 2005-11-16 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Tahib, N., Arinell, H., Ramklint, M. & Ahmad, A.Validation of the Kurdish version of the Harvard-Uppsala Trauma Questionnaire for Children (HUTQ-C).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Kurdish version of the Harvard-Uppsala Trauma Questionnaire for Children (HUTQ-C)
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Harvard-Uppsala Trauma Questionnaire for Children (HUTQ-C) is an instrument developed from the adult version of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) by adding 13 child specific items. The HUTQ-C is used to identify traumatic events among children. However, no psychometric evaluation of the Kurdish translation of the HUTQ-C has been published. The aim of this article was to study the psychometric characteristics of the Kurdish version of the HUTQC. Data on HUTQ-C were collected for 100 street working children and 100 school children in Duhok. The internal consistency of the HUTQ-C was examined with Cronbach's alpha. The convergent validity of the HUTQ-C was examined by comparison with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The internal consistency for the total 30 items HUTQ-C of the three domains, experienced, witnessed and heard, showed good internal consistency; Cronbach’s alpha was 0.83. The HUTQ-C showed higher internal consistency than both the original 17 items from HTQ and the added 13 child specific items, when these were examined separately. There was significant difference in HUTQ-C scores for those with normal range compared to those with clinical range on the anxious/depressed scale of Child Behavior Check List (CBCL) (KruskalWallis Test=6.22, p<0.05) supporting convergent validity. The Kurdish HUTQ-C shows promising reliability and validity. 

Keywords
HUTQ-C, Kurdish version, psychometric properties, reliability, validity
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382870 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications