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Anens, Elisabeth
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Tuvemo Johnson, S., Martin, C., Anens, E., Johansson, A.-C. & Hellström, K. (2018). Older adults' opinions on fall prevention in relation to physical activity level. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 37(1), 58-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older adults' opinions on fall prevention in relation to physical activity level
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 58-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to explore and describe older adults' opinions regarding actions to prevent falls and to analyze differences in the opinions of highly versus less physically active older adults. An open-ended question was answered by 262 individuals aged 75 to 98 years living in the community. The answers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, and differences in the categories were compared between highly and less physically active persons. Physical activity was measured according to a five-level scale. The content analysis resulted in eight categories: assistive devices, avoiding hazards, behavioral adaptive strategies, being physically active, healthy lifestyle, indoor modifications, outdoor modifications, and seeking assistance. Behavioral adaptive strategies were mentioned to a greater extent by highly active people, and indoor modifications were more often mentioned by less active older adults. Support for active self-directed behavioral strategies might be important for fall prevention among less physically active older adults.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-278203 (URN)10.1177/0733464815624776 (DOI)000417697100005 ()26769824 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved
Anens, E., Zetterberg, L., Urell, C., Emtner, M. & Hellström, K. (2017). Self-reported physical activity correlates in Swedish adults with multiple sclerosis: a cross-sectional study. BMC Neurology, 17, Article ID 204.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported physical activity correlates in Swedish adults with multiple sclerosis: a cross-sectional study
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2017 (English)In: BMC Neurology, ISSN 1471-2377, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 17, article id 204Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The benefits of physical activity in persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are considerable. Knowledge about factors that correlate to physical activity is helpful in order to develop successful strategies to increase physical activity in persons with MS. Previous studies have focused on correlates to physical activity in MS, however falls self-efficacy, social support and enjoyment of physical activity are not much studied, as well as if the correlates differ with regard to disease severity. The aim of the study was to examine associations between physical activity and age, gender, employment, having children living at home, education, disease type, disease severity, fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, falls self-efficacy, social support and enjoyment of physical activity in a sample of persons with MS and in subgroups with regard to disease severity.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey study including Swedish community living adults with MS, 287 persons, response rate 58.2%. The survey included standardized self-reported scales measuring physical activity, disease severity, fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, falls self-efficacy, and social support. Physical activity was measured by the Physical Activity Disability Survey – Revised.

Results: Multiple regression analyzes showed that 59% (F(6,3)=64.9, p=0.000) of the variation in physical activity was explained by having less severe disease (β=-0.30), being employed (β=0.26), having high falls self-efficacy (β=0.20), having high self-efficacy for physical activity (β=0.17), and enjoying physical activity (β=0.11). In persons with moderate/severe MS, self-efficacy for physical activity explained physical activity.

Conclusions: Consistent with previous research in persons with MS in other countries this study shows that disease severity, employment and self-efficacy for physical activity are important for physical activity. Additional important factors were falls self-efficacy and enjoyment. More research is needed to confirm this and the subgroup differences.

Keywords
Exercise, Multiple sclerosis, Physical therapy, Rehabilitaton, Self-efficacy
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335306 (URN)10.1186/s12883-017-0981-4 (DOI)000416928600001 ()29191168 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Anens, E., Emtner, M. & Hellström, K. (2015). Exploratory Study of Physical Activity in Persons With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(2), 260-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploratory Study of Physical Activity in Persons With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease
2015 (English)In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To explore and describe the perceived facilitators and barriers to physical activity, and to examine the physical activity correlates in people with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Design: Cross-sectional survey study. Setting: Community-living subjects. Participants: Swedish people with CMT disease (N=44; men, 54.5%; median age, 59.5y [interquartile range, 45.3-64.8y]). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The survey included open-ended questions and standardized self-reported scales measuring physical activity, fatigue, activity limitation, self-efficacy for physical activity, fall-related self-efficacy, social support, and enjoyment of physical activity. Physical activity was measured by the Physical Activity Disability Survey-Revised. Results: Qualitative content analysis revealed that personal factors such as fatigue, poor balance, muscle weakness, and pain were important barriers for physical activity behavior. Facilitators of physical activity were self-efficacy for physical activity, activity-related factors, and assistive devices. Multiple regression analysis showed that self-efficacy for physical activity (beta=.41) and fatigue (beta=-.30) explained 31.8% of the variation in physical activity (F-2,F-40=10.78, P=.000). Conclusions: Despite the well-known benefits of physical activity, physical activity in people with CMT disease is very sparsely studied. These new results contribute to the understanding of factors important for physical activity behavior in people with CMT disease and can guide health professionals to facilitate physical activity behavior in this group of patients. (C) 2015 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

Keywords
Exercise, Fatigue, Neuromuscular diseases, Rehabilitation, Self efficacy
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246814 (URN)10.1016/j.apmr.2014.09.013 (DOI)000348751800012 ()25286435 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Zetterberg, L., Urell, C. & Anens, E. (2015). Exploring factors related to physical activity in cervical dystonia. BMC Neurology, 15, Article ID 247.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring factors related to physical activity in cervical dystonia
2015 (English)In: BMC Neurology, ISSN 1471-2377, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 15, article id 247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

People with disabilities have reported worse health status than people without disabilities and receiving fewer preventive health services such as counseling around exercise habits. This is noteworthy considering the negative consequences associated with physical inactivity. No research has been conducted on physical activity in cervical dystonia (CD), despite its possible major impact on self-perceived health and disability. Considering the favorable consequences associated with physical activity it is important to know how to promote physical activity behavior in CD. Knowledge of variables important for such behavior in CD is therefore crucial. The aim of this study was to explore factors related to physical activity in individuals with cervical dystonia.

Methods

Subjects included in this cross-sectional study were individuals diagnosed with CD and enrolled at neurology clinics (n = 369). Data was collected using one surface mailed self-reported questionnaire. Physical activity was the primary outcome variable, measured with the Physical Activity Disability Survey. Secondary outcome variables were: impact of dystonia measured with the Cervical Dystonia Impact Scale; fatigue measured with the Fatigue Severity Scale; confidence when carrying out physical activity measured with the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale; confidence in performing daily activities without falling measured with the Falls Efficacy Scale; enjoyment of activity measured with Enjoyment of Physical Activity Scale, and social influences on physical activity measured with Social Influences on Physical Activity in addition to demographic characteristics such as age, education level and employment status.

Results

The questionnaire was completed by 173 individuals (47 % response rate). The multivariate association between related variables and physical activity showed that employment, self-efficacy for physical activity, education level and consequences for daily activities explained 51 % of the variance in physical activity (Adj R 0.51, F (5, 162) = 35.611, p = 0.000). Employment and self-efficacy for physical activity contributed most strongly to the association with physical activity.

Conclusions

Considering the favorable consequences associated with physical activity it could be important to support the individuals with CD to remain in work and self-efficacy to physical activity as employment and self-efficacy had significant influence on physical activity level. Future research is needed to evaluate causal effects of physical activity on consequences related to CD .

Keywords
dystonia, physical activity
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275217 (URN)10.1186/s12883-015-0499-6 (DOI)000365508900001 ()26620275 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-01 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ahlström, I., Hellström, K., Emtner, M. & Anens, E. (2015). Reliability of the Swedish version of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (S-ESES): a test-retest study in adults with neurological disease. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 31(3), 194-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability of the Swedish version of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (S-ESES): a test-retest study in adults with neurological disease
2015 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 194-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine the test-retest reliability of the Swedish translated version of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (S-ESES) in people with neurological disease and to examine internal consistency.

Design: Test-retest study.

Subjects: A total of 30 adults with neurological diseases including: Parkinson's disease; Multiple Sclerosis; Cervical Dystonia; and Charcot Marie Tooth disease.

Method: The S-ESES was sent twice by surface mail. Completion interval mean was 16 days apart. Weighted kappa, intraclass correlation coefficient 2,1 [ICC (2,1)], standard error of measurement (SEM), also expressed as a percentage value (SEM%), and Cronbach's alpha were calculated.

Results: The relative reliability of the test-retest results showed substantial agreement measured using weighted kappa (MD = 0.62) and a very high-reliability ICC (2,1) (0.92). Absolute reliability measured using SEM was 5.3 and SEM% was 20.7. Excellent internal consistency was shown, with an alpha coefficient of 0.91 (test 1) and 0.93 (test 2).

Conclusion: The S-ESES is recommended for use in research and in clinical work for people with neurological diseases. The low-absolute reliability, however, indicates a limited ability to measure changes on an individual level.

National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245741 (URN)10.3109/09593985.2014.982776 (DOI)000352858300007 ()25418018 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-02-27 Created: 2015-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Anens, E., Emtner, M., Zetterberg, L. & Hellström, K. (2014). Physical activity in subjects with multiple sclerosis with focus on gender differences: a survey. BMC Neurology, 14, 47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity in subjects with multiple sclerosis with focus on gender differences: a survey
2014 (English)In: BMC Neurology, ISSN 1471-2377, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 14, p. 47-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is increasing research that examines gender-issues in multiple sclerosis (MS), but little focus has been placed on gender-issues regarding physical activity. The aim of the present study was to describe levels of physical activity, self-efficacy for physical activity, fall-related self-efficacy, social support for physical activity, fatigue levels and the impact of MS on daily life, in addition to investigating gender differences. Methods: The sample for this cross-sectional cohort study consisted of 287 (84 men; 29.3%) adults with MS recruited from the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. A questionnaire was sent to the subjects consisting of the self-administrated measurements: Physical Activity Disability Survey - Revised, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Falls-Efficacy Scale (Swedish version), Social Influences on Physical Activity, Fatigue Severity Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Response rate was 58.2%. Results: Men were less physically active, had lower self-efficacy for physical activity and lower fall-related self-efficacy than women. This was explained by men being more physically affected by the disease. Men also received less social support for physical activity from family members. The level of fatigue and psychological consequences of the disease were similar between the genders in the total sample, but subgroups of women with moderate MS and relapsing remitting MS experienced more fatigue than men. Conclusions: Men were less physically active, probably a result of being more physically affected by the disease. Men being more physically affected explained most of the gender differences found in this study. However, the number of men in the subgroup analyses was small and more research is needed. A gender perspective should be considered in strategies for promoting physical activity in subjects with MS, e. g. men may need more support to be physically active.

Keywords
Multiple sclerosis, Gender, Physical activity, Self-efficacy, Fatigue, Social support
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-223532 (URN)10.1186/1471-2377-14-47 (DOI)000332640600001 ()
Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-22 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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