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Forslund, Tommie
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Frick, M. A., Forslund, T. & Brocki, K. C. (2019). Can reactivity and regulation in infancy predict inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behavior in 3-year-olds?. Development and psychopathology (Print), 31(2), 619-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can reactivity and regulation in infancy predict inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behavior in 3-year-olds?
2019 (English)In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 619-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A need to identify early infant markers of later occurring inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors has come to the fore in the current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder literature. The purpose of such studies is to identify driving mechanisms that could enable early detection of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder liability and thus facilitate early intervention. Here we study independent and interactive effects of cognitive regulation (inhibition and sustained attention), temperament (reactive and regulatory aspects), and maternal sensitivity (as external regulation) in a sample of 112 typically developing 10-month-old infants (59 boys, 52.7%), in relation to inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behavior at 3 years. The results showed that infant temperamental regulation and maternal sensitivity made independent contributions to both inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, in that higher levels of temperamental regulation and maternal sensitivity were related to less inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behavior. In addition, the temperamental factor positive affectivity/surgency made a significant contribution to later hyperactivity/impulsivity, in that higher levels of positive affectivity/surgency were related to more hyperactive/impulsive behavior. No interaction effects were found. Our findings suggest temperament and parental regulation as potential and independent markers of later inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behavior.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348127 (URN)10.1017/S0954579418000160 (DOI)000466341900017 ()29606186 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-1222
Available from: 2018-04-10 Created: 2018-04-10 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Brocki, K. C., Forslund, T., Frick, M. & Bohlin, G. (2019). Do Individual Differences in Early Affective and Cognitive Self-Regulation Predict Developmental Change in ADHD Symptoms From Preschool to Adolescence?. Journal of Attention Disorders, 23(13), 1656-1666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Individual Differences in Early Affective and Cognitive Self-Regulation Predict Developmental Change in ADHD Symptoms From Preschool to Adolescence?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, ISSN 1087-0547, Vol. 23, no 13, p. 1656-1666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The role of heterogeneous self-regulation deficits in ADHD has long been emphasized. Yet, longitudinal studies examining distinct self-regulation processes as prospective predictors of developmental change in ADHD symptoms spanning wide developmental periods are scarce. The aim of the current study was to examine affective and cognitive self-regulation as predictors of developmental change in ADHD symptoms from preschool to adolescence in a sample with one third of the children being at risk for developing an ADHD and/or ODD diagnosis.

Method: At 5 years laboratory measures for hot and cool executive function (EF) and parental and teacher ratings were used for regulation of positive and negative emotionality. Symptoms of ADHD and ODD were measured at 5 and 13 years using parental and teacher ratings based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV).

Results: Converging developmental paths in hyperactivity/impulsivity across time were found for those high versus low in early cognitive self-regulation, whereas the development of inattention symptoms diverged across time for those high versus low in early affective self-regulation.

Conclusion: These results support the idea that different aspects of self-regulation are important for developmental change in the two separate ADHD symptom domains from preschool to adolescence.

Keywords
emotion regulation, hot EF, cool EF, developmental change, ADHD symptoms, longitudinal
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316473 (URN)10.1177/1087054717693372 (DOI)000484595800012 ()
Funder
Sven Jerring Foundation, UU PSYK 2013/265
Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Frick, M. A., Forslund, T. & Brocki, K. C. (2019). Does child verbal ability mediate the relationship between maternal sensitivity and later self-regulation?: A longitudinal study from infancy to 4 years. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 60(2), 97-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does child verbal ability mediate the relationship between maternal sensitivity and later self-regulation?: A longitudinal study from infancy to 4 years
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need to further examine the mechanisms by which maternal sensitivity influences the development of child self-regulation. This study investigated the role of maternal sensitivity when infants were 10 months old and child verbal ability at 18 months, in relation to various aspects of self-regulation at 48 months, in a sample of 95 typically developing children (46.3% girls). In particular, the study examined, from a Vygotskian perspective, whether child verbal ability, as measured by receptive and expressive language, mediated the relationship between maternal sensitivity and hot and cool aspects of self-regulation in the child. As hypothesized, maternal sensitivity predicted child verbal ability, as well as working memory, set shifting, and delay of gratification. Child receptive language predicted set shifting, inhibition, and delay of gratification. In addition, receptive language mediated the relationship between maternal sensitivity and inhibition only. Additive effects of maternal sensitivity and child receptive language in relation to set shifting were found, and a main effect of maternal sensitivity on child delay of gratification. The results add to the body of research suggesting that responsive parenting and child verbal ability are important for the development of self-regulation, and suggest that different mechanisms may be at work for different aspects of self-regulation.

Keywords
Responsive parenting, receptive language, expressive language, hot and cool executive functions, mediation
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373025 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12512 (DOI)000460705900002 ()30625240 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-1222
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Forslund, T. (2018). Disorganized Attachment Representations, Externalizing Behavior Problems, and Socio-Emotional Competences. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disorganized Attachment Representations, Externalizing Behavior Problems, and Socio-Emotional Competences
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Disorganized attachment is a risk-factor for developmental maladaptation in the form of externalizing behavior problems, and for poor development of competences important for socio-emotional functioning. Concerns have however been raised regarding theoretical overextension, and there is consequently a need for multifactorial studies that examine which outcomes disorganized attachment is reliably important for. There is also a lack of research on the mechanisms that mediate the relation between disorganized attachment and externalizing problems. The present thesis therefore examined whether disorganized attachment is a specific risk-factor for symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), or a non-specific risk factor for both types of problems. Several emotional and cognitive competences were investigated as mediators, with the question of whether disorganized attachment becomes associated with externalizing problems primarily through any specific mechanism, or through multiple mechanisms. Three studies were conducted. Children completed the separation anxiety test for attachment representations and laboratory tasks for distinct competences, and parents and teachers rated emotion regulation and ODD- and ADHD-symptoms. Study I was cross-sectional and found that disorganized attachment contributed specifically to conduct problems when accounting for ADHD-symptoms. However, disorganized attachment did not contribute to ADHD-symptoms when accounting for conduct problems. Study II found that children with disorganized attachment representations show deviations in identification of emotional expressions, in the form of a generally diminished ability to discriminate between expressions rather than in response biases. Study III was (short-term) longitudinal and replicated the results from Study I; disorganized attachment was primarily associated with ODD-symptoms, not ADHD-symptoms. Elevated emotional reactivity and poor regulation, particularly for anger and fear, mediated the relation between disorganized attachment and ODD-symptoms. Taken together, the present findings suggest that disorganized attachment may constitute a specific risk factor for externalizing problems pertaining to anger and aggression, such as oppositionality and misconduct, rather than ADHD-problems. Importantly, the findings caution against ideas of a pathway from disorganized attachment to ADHD-symptoms. The deviations in processing and regulation of anger and fear corroborate Bowlby´s proposal that these emotions are closely connected, central to disorganization, and a potential mediating mechanism in relation to externalizing problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018. p. 91
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 160
Keywords
Disorganized Attachment, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Emotion Regulation, Self-Regulation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361363 (URN)978-91-513-0452-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-11-09, Betty Pettersson, Blåsenhus, Uppsala, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-10-18 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-11-19
Frick, M. A., Forslund, T., Fransson, M., Johansson, M., Bohlin, G. & Brocki, K. C. (2018). The role of sustained attention, maternal sensitivity, and infant temperament in the development of early self-regulation. British Journal of Psychology, 109(2), 277-298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of sustained attention, maternal sensitivity, and infant temperament in the development of early self-regulation
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0007-1269, E-ISSN 2044-8295, Vol. 109, no 2, p. 277-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated infant predictors of early cognitive and emotional self-regulation from an intrinsic and caregiving environmental perspective. Sustained attention, reactive aspects of infant temperament, and maternal sensitivity were assessed at 10months (n=124) and early self-regulation (including executive functions, EF, and emotion regulation) was assessed at 18months. The results indicated that sustained attention predicted early EF, which provide empirical support for the hierarchical framework of EF development, advocating early attention as a foundation for the development of cognitive self-regulation. Maternal sensitivity and surgency predicted emotion regulation, in that infants of sensitive mothers showed more regulatory behaviours and a longer latency to distress, whereas high levels of surgency predicted low emotion regulation, suggesting both the caregiving environment and temperament as important in the development of self-regulation. Interaction effects suggested high sustained attention to be a protective factor for children of insensitive mothers, in relation to emotion regulation. In addition, high levels of maternal sensitivity seemed to foster development of emotion regulation among children with low to medium levels of sustained attention and/or surgency. In all, our findings point to the importance of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors in infant development of self-regulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
emotion regulation, executive functions, infant temperament, maternal sensitivity, self-regulation, sustained attention
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352572 (URN)10.1111/bjop.12266 (DOI)000429702400007 ()28895129 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-1222
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Forslund, T., Kenward, B., Granqvist, P., Gredebäck, G. & Brocki, K. C. (2017). Diminished ability to identify facial emotional expressions in children with disorganized attachment representations. Developmental Science, 20(6), Article ID e12465.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diminished ability to identify facial emotional expressions in children with disorganized attachment representations
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2017 (English)In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 20, no 6, article id e12465Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The development of children's ability to identify facial emotional expressions has long been suggested to be experience dependent, with parental caregiving as an important influencing factor. This study attempts to further this knowledge by examining disorganization of the attachment system as a potential psychological mechanism behind aberrant caregiving experiences and deviations in the ability to identify facial emotional expressions. Typically developing children (= 105, 49.5% boys) aged 6–7 years (= 6 years 8 months, SD = 1.8 months) completed an attachment representation task and an emotion identification task, and parents rated children's negative emotionality. The results showed a generally diminished ability in disorganized children to identify facial emotional expressions, but no response biases. Disorganized attachment was also related to higher levels of negative emotionality, but discrimination of emotional expressions did not moderate or mediate this relation. Our novel findings relate disorganized attachment to deviations in emotion identification, and therefore suggest that disorganization of the attachment system may constitute a psychological mechanism linking aberrant caregiving experiences to deviations in children's ability to identify facial emotional expressions. Our findings further suggest that deviations in emotion identification in disorganized children, in the absence of maltreatment, may manifest in a generally diminished ability to identify emotional expressions, rather than in specific response biases.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310371 (URN)10.1111/desc.12465 (DOI)000413901000011 ()27966280 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 412-2012-1222
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Forslund, T. & Granqvist, P. (2017). Effects of Attachment Quality and Organization. In: Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science: (pp. 1-12). Cham: Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Attachment Quality and Organization
2017 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science / [ed] Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339501 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_1964-1 (DOI)978-3-319-16999-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-19 Created: 2018-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Forslund, T. & Granqvist, P. (2017). Infant Survival. In: Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science: (pp. 1-5). Cham: Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infant Survival
2017 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science / [ed] Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339499 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_1965-1 (DOI)978-3-319-16999-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-19 Created: 2018-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, L., Fransson, M., Forslund, T., Springer, L. & Granqvist, P. (2017). Maternal Sensitivity in Mothers with Mild Intellectual Disabilities is Related to Experiences of Maltreatment and Predictive of Child Attachment: A Matched-Comparison Study. JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, 30(3), 445-455
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal Sensitivity in Mothers with Mild Intellectual Disabilities is Related to Experiences of Maltreatment and Predictive of Child Attachment: A Matched-Comparison Study
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2017 (English)In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 445-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Scientific knowledge on the quality of caregiving/maternal sensitivity among mothers with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) is limited and subject to many methodological shortcomings, but seems to suggest that these mothers are less sensitive than mothers without intellectual disabilities.

Methods: In this matched-comparison study (N=48), the present authors observed maternal sensitivity for 20min in four different laboratory play situations. The study also included semi-structured interviews to assess maternal experiences of maltreatment and child attachment.

Results: The present authors found significantly lower sensitivity among mothers with intellectual disabilities than among a comparison group of mothers without intellectual disabilities. Among mothers with intellectual disabilities, low sensitivity was related to maternal experiences of maltreatment and predictive of disorganized child attachment. In the comparison group, high maternal sensitivity was related to partner presence and social support, and predictive of child intelligence.

Conclusions: The present authors highlight the importance of attending to intellectual disabilities mothers' history of receiving care to understand their capacity for giving adequate care.

Keywords
attachment, intellectual disabilities, intelligence, maltreatment, maternal sensitivity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322095 (URN)10.1111/jar.12300 (DOI)000398841100004 ()27878912 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, Dnr 2005-0328
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2017-05-16Bibliographically approved
Forslund, T. & Granqvist, P. (2016). Disorganized Attachment and Reactive Attachment Disorder. In: Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science: (pp. 1-5). Cham: Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disorganized Attachment and Reactive Attachment Disorder
2016 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science / [ed] Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2016, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2016
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339497 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_1962-1 (DOI)978-3-319-16999-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-19 Created: 2018-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
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