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Eriksson, Urban, Lektor i fysik med inriktning mot fysikdidaktikORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6638-1246
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Eriksson, M., Linder, C. & Eriksson, U. (2018). Students' understanding of algebraic signs: An underestimated learning challenge?. In: : . Paper presented at American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) Summer Meeting, Washington D.C., USA, 28 July - 1 August 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' understanding of algebraic signs: An underestimated learning challenge?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

When starting to learn about vector quantities in introductory physics, it is important that students accurately understand the intended meaning of plus and minus algebraic signs in order to appropriately solve physics problems. We present a case study of 82 introductory-level physics students from Sweden and South Africa and show that the lack of understanding of algebraic signs can result in learning challenges even in the introductory topic of one dimensional kinematics. Results of this study will be described and implications for teaching will be discussed.

National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369506 (URN)
Conference
American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) Summer Meeting, Washington D.C., USA, 28 July - 1 August 2018
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Airey, J. & Urban, E. (2014). A Semiotic Analysis of the Disciplinary Affordances of the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram in Astronomy.. In: : . Paper presented at The 5th International 360 Conference. Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark (pp. 22). Aarhus: Aarhus University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Semiotic Analysis of the Disciplinary Affordances of the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram in Astronomy.
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the central characteristics of disciplines is that they create their own particular ways of knowing the world through their discourse (Airey & Linder 2009). This process is facilitated by the specialization and refinement of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources over time. Nowhere is this truer than in the sciences, where it is the norm that disciplinary-specific representations have been introduced and then refined by a number of different actors (Airey 2009). As a consequence, many of the semiotic resources used in the sciences today still retain some traces of their historical roots. This makes the aquisition of disciplinary literacy (Airey, 2013) particularly problematic (see Eriksson et al. 2014 for an example from astronomy).

 In this paper we analyse one such disciplinary-specific semiotic resource from the field of Astronomy—the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We audit the potential of this semiotic resource to provide access to disciplinary knowledge—what Fredlund et al (2012) have termed its disciplinary affordances. Our analysis includes consideration of the use of scales, labels, symbols, sizes and colour. We show how, for historical reasons, the use of these aspects in the resource may differ from what might be expected by a newcomer to the discipline.

We suggest that some of the issues we highlight in our analysis may, in fact, be contributors to alternative conceptions and therefore propose that lecturers pay particular attention to the disambiguation of these features for their students.

 

References

Airey, J. (2013). Disciplinary Literacy. In E. Lundqvist, L. Östman & R. Säljö (Eds.), Scientific literacy – teori och praktik (pp. 41-58): Gleerups.

Airey, J. (2009). Science, Language and Literacy. Case Studies of Learning in Swedish University Physics. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology 81. Uppsala  Retrieved 2009-04-27, from http://publications.uu.se/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=9547

Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2009). A disciplinary discourse perspective on university science learning: Achieving fluency in a critical constellation of modes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 27-49.

Eriksson, U., Linder, C., Airey, J., & Redfors, A. (2014). Who needs 3D when the Universe is flat? Science Education, 98(3), 412-442.

Fredlund, T., Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2012). Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction. European Journal of Physics, 33, 657-666.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aarhus: Aarhus University, 2014
Keywords
Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, Disciplinary affordance, Disciplinary literacy, semiiotics, undergraduate learning
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-224432 (URN)
Conference
The 5th International 360 Conference. Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-05-12 Created: 2014-05-12 Last updated: 2014-11-11Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, U., Linder, C., Airey, J. & Redfors, A. (2014). Introducing the anatomy of disciplinary discernment: an example from astronomy. European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 2(3), 167-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing the anatomy of disciplinary discernment: an example from astronomy
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 2301-251X, E-ISSN 2301-251X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 167-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Education is increasingly being framed by a competence mindset; the value of knowledge lies much more in competence performativity and innovation than in simply knowing. Reaching such competency in areas such as astronomy and physics has long been known to be challenging. The movement from everyday conceptions of the world around us to a disciplinary interpretation is fraught with pitfalls and problems. Thus, what underpins the characteristics of the disciplinary trajectory to competence becomes an important educational consideration. In this article we report on a study involving what students and lecturers discern from the same disciplinary semiotic resource. We use this to propose an Anatomy of Disciplinary Discernment (ADD), a hierarchy of what is focused on and how it is interpreted in an appropriate, disciplinary manner, as an overarching fundamental aspect of disciplinary learning. Students and lecturers in astronomy and physics were asked to describe what they could discern from a video simulation of travel through our Galaxy and beyond. In all, 137 people from nine countries participated. The descriptions were analysed using a hermeneutic interpretive study approach. The analysis resulted in the formulation of five qualitatively different categories of discernment; the ADD, reflecting a view of participants’ competence levels. The ADD reveals four increasing levels of disciplinary discernment: Identification, Explanation, Appreciation, and Evaluation. This facilitates the identification of a clear relationship between educational level and the level of disciplinary discernment. The analytical outcomes of the study suggest how teachers of science, after using the ADD to assess the students disciplinary knowledge, may attain new insights into how to create more effective learning environments by explicitly crafting their teaching to support the crossing of boundaries in the ADD model.  

Keywords
Disciplinary affordance, Learning astronomy, Anatomy of Disciplinary Discernment, Teaching insights
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234620 (URN)
Available from: 2014-10-21 Created: 2014-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Airey, J., Eriksson, U., Fredlund, T. & Linder, C. (2014). On the Disciplinary Affordances of Semiotic Resources. In: : . Paper presented at The first Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics, Lund, Sweden, 25-27 Sept 2014 (pp. 54-55).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Disciplinary Affordances of Semiotic Resources
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the late 70’s Gibson (1979) introduced the concept of affordance. Initially framed around the needs of an organism in its environment, over the years the term has been appropriated and debated at length by a number of researchers in various fields. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when they are perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al. (2001) have claimed that different modes have different specialized affordances. Then, building on this idea, Airey and Linder (2009) suggested that there is a critical constellation of modes that students need to achieve fluency in before they can experience a concept in an appropriate disciplinary manner. Later, Airey (2009) nuanced this claim, shifting the focus from the modes themselves to a critical constellation of semiotic resources, thus acknowledging that different semiotic resources within a mode often have different affordances (e.g. two or more diagrams may form the critical constellation).

In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical tool for use in education. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the discernment of one individual, it refers to the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by those functions that the resource is expected to fulfil by the disciplinary community. Disciplinary affordances have thus been negotiated and developed within the discipline over time. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or discerned becomes moot. Rather, from an educational perspective the issue is whether the meaning that a semiotic resource affords to an individual matches the disciplinary affordance assigned by the community. The power of the term for educational work is that learning can now be framed as coming to discern the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

In this paper we will briefly discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

Keywords
Affordances, Disciplinary affordance, Undergraduate Physics, Semiotics
National Category
Other Physics Topics Didactics General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233144 (URN)
Conference
The first Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics, Lund, Sweden, 25-27 Sept 2014
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-09-29 Created: 2014-09-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, U. (2014). Reading the Sky: From Starspots to Spotting Stars. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading the Sky: From Starspots to Spotting Stars
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis encompasses two research fields in astronomy: astrometry and astronomy education and they are discussed in two parts. These parts represent two sides of a coin; astrometry, which is about constructing 3D representations of the Universe, and AER, where for this thesis, the goal is to investigate university students’ and lecturers’ disciplinary discernment vis-à-vis the structure of the Universe and extrapolating three-dimensionality.

Part I presents an investigation of stellar surface structures influence on ultra-high-precision astrometry. The expected effects in different regions of the HR-diagram were quantified. I also investigated the astrometric effect of exoplanets, since astrometric detection will become possible with projects such as Gaia. Stellar surface structures produce small brightness variations, influencing integrated properties such as the total flux, radial velocity and photocenter position. These properties were modelled and statistical relations between the variations of the different properties were derived. From the models it is clear that for most stellar types the astrometric jitter due to stellar surface structures is expected to be of order 10 μAU or greater. This is more than the astrometric displacement typically caused by an Earth-sized exoplanet in the habitable zone, which is about 1–4 μAU, making astrometric detection difficult.

Part II presents an investigation of disciplinary discernment at the university level. Astronomy education is a particularly challenging experience for students because discernment of the ‘real’ Universe is problematic, making interpretation of the many disciplinary-specific representations used an important educational issue. The ability to ‘fluently’ discern the disciplinary affordances of these representations becomes crucial for the effective learning of astronomy. To understand the Universe I conclude that specific experiences are called. Simulations could offer these experiences, where parallax motion is a crucial component. In a qualitative study, I have analysed students’ and lecturers’ discernment while watching a simulation video, and found hierarchies that characterize the discernment in terms of three-dimensionality extrapolation and an Anatomy of Disciplinary Discernment. I combined these to define a new construct: Reading the Sky. I conclude that this is a vital competency needed for learning astronomy and suggest strategies for how to implement this in astronomy education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2014. p. 229
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1196
Keywords
Astrometry, Astronomy Education Research, Disciplinary Discernment, Extrapolating three-dimensionality, Reading the Sky
National Category
Didactics Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234636 (URN)978-91-554-9086-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-12-11, Polhemsalen (Å10134), Ångströmlaboratoriet, Uppsala, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-11-20 Created: 2014-10-21 Last updated: 2015-07-10
Eriksson, U., Linder, C., Airey, J. & Redfors, A. (2014). Tell me what you see: Differences in what is discerned when professors and students view the same disciplinary semiotic resource. In: : . Paper presented at The 5th international 360° conference: Encompassing the Multimodality of Knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tell me what you see: Differences in what is discerned when professors and students view the same disciplinary semiotic resource
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Traditionally, astronomy and physics have been viewed as difficult subjects to master. The movement from everyday conceptions of the world around us to a disciplinary interpretation is fraught with pitfalls and problems. What characterises a disciplinary insider’s discernment of phenomena in astronomy and how does it compare to the views of newcomers to the field? In this paper we report on a study into what students and professors discern (cf. Eriksson et al, in press) from the same disciplinary semiotic resource and use this to propose an Anatomy of Disciplinary Discernment (ADD) as an overarching characterization of disciplinary learning.

Students and professors in astronomy and physics were asked to describe what they could discern from a simulation video of travel through our Galaxy and beyond (Tully, 2012). In all, 137 people from nine countries participated. The descriptions were analysed using a hermeneutic, constant comparison approach (Seebohm, 2004; Strauss, 1987). Analysis culminated in the formulation of five hierarchically arranged, qualitatively different categories of discernment. This ADD modelling of the data consists of one non-disciplinary category and four levels of disciplinary discernment: Identification, Explanation, Appreciation, and Evaluation. Our analysis demonstrates a clear relationship between educational level and the level of disciplinary discernment.

 

The analytic outcomes of the study suggest that teachers may create more effective learning environments by explicitly crafting their teaching to support the discernment of various aspects of disciplinary semiotic resources in order to facilitate the crossing of boundaries in the ADD model.

National Category
Didactics Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234622 (URN)
Conference
The 5th international 360° conference: Encompassing the Multimodality of Knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus
Available from: 2014-10-21 Created: 2014-10-21 Last updated: 2016-04-15
Eriksson, U., Linder, C., Airey, J. & Redfors, A. (2014). The Anatomy of Disciplinary Discernment: An argument for a spiral trajectory of learning in physics education. In: : . Paper presented at The First Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics (IACS). Lund, Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Anatomy of Disciplinary Discernment: An argument for a spiral trajectory of learning in physics education
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Traditionally, physics has been viewed as a difficult subject to master. The movement from everyday conceptions of the world around us to a disciplinary interpretation is fraught with problems. What characterises this disciplinary development from learner to expert? In this presentation we report on a study involving what students and professors discern from a disciplinary representation and use this to propose an Anatomy of Disciplinary Discernment (ADD) as an overarching characterization of disciplinary learning. To do this we bring together three important educational ideas – first, Bruner’s (1960) notion of the spiral curriculum. Second, Fredlund, Airey, and Linder’s (2012) notion of disciplinary affordances -- the ‘inherent potential of a representation to provide access to disciplinary knowledge’. Thirdly Eriksson, Linder, Airey, and Redfors’ (2013) notion of disciplinary discernment -- noticing something (eg. Mason, 2002), reflecting on it (Schön, 1983), and constructing (disciplinary) meaning (Marton & Booth, 1997).

 

Students in astronomy and their teaching professors were asked to describe what they discerned from a simulation video of travel through our galaxy and beyond. In all, 137 people from nine countries participated. The descriptions were analysed using a standard interpretive study approach (Erickson, 1986; Gallagher, 1991). This resulted in the formulation of five qualitatively different categories of discernment.

 

We found that these categories of disciplinary discernment could be arranged into an anatomy of hierarchically increasing levels of disciplinary discernment and subsequently the idea of ADD with a unit of analysis being the discernment of disciplinary affordance. The ADD modelling for the data incorporated four increasing levels disciplinary discernment: Identification, Explanation, Appreciation, and Evaluation. The visualization of the analysis demonstrates a clear relationship between educational level and the level of disciplinary discernment. Hence, the ADD can be seen to be related to Bruner’s concept of the spiral curriculum idea and through this relationship projects a learning trajectory that students experience while moving through the educational system.

 

The analytic outcomes of the study suggest how teachers may gain insight into how to create more effective learning environments for students to successfully negotiate a required learning trajectory by explicitly crafting the teaching to support the crossing of boundaries.

 

References

 

Bruner, J. S. (1960). The process of education: Harvard University Press.

Erickson, F. (1986). Qualitative methods in research on teaching. In M. C. Wittrock (Ed.), Handbook of research on teaching (3 ed., pp. 119-161). New York: Macmillan.

Eriksson, U., Linder, C., Airey, J., & Redfors, A. (2013). Who needs 3D when the Universe is flat? Accepted by Science Education.

Fredlund, T., Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2012). Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction. European Journal of Physics, 33(3), 657.

Gallagher, J. J. (1991). Interpretive research in science education, Vol. 4. Manhattan, KS: National Association for Research in Science Teaching.

Marton, F., & Booth, S. (1997). Learning and Awareness: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Mason, J. (2002). Researching your own practice : the discipline of noticing. London: Routledge Farmer.

Schön, D. A. (1983). The reflective practitioner: How professionals think in action. New York: Basic Books.

 

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund, Sweden: , 2014
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234626 (URN)
Conference
The First Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics (IACS)
Available from: 2014-10-21 Created: 2014-10-21 Last updated: 2016-04-15
Airey, J., Eriksson, U., Fredlund, T. & Linder, C. (2014). The Concept of Disciplinary Affordance. In: : . Paper presented at The 5th International 360 Conference. Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark (pp. 20).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Concept of Disciplinary Affordance
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since its introduction by Gibson (1979) the concept of affordance has been discussed at length by a number of researchers. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al (2001) claim that different modes have different specialized affordances.

 

In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical educational tool. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the perception of an individual, it focuses on the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by the functions that it is expected to fulfil for the discipline. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or perceived becomes moot. Rather, the issue is what a semiotic resource affords to an individual and whether this matches the disciplinary affordance. The power of the term is that learning can now be framed as coming to perceive the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

 

In this paper we will discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

 

References

Airey, J. (2009). Science, Language and Literacy. Case Studies of Learning in Swedish University Physics. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology 81. Uppsala  Retrieved 2009-04-27, from http://publications.uu.se/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=9547

Fredlund, T., Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2012). Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction. European Journal of Physics, 33, 657-666.

Gibson, J. J. (1979). The theory of affordances The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception (pp. 127-143). Boston: Houghton Miffin.

Kress, G., Jewitt, C., Ogborn, J., & Tsatsarelis, C. (2001). Multimodal teaching and learning: The rhetorics of the science classroom. London: Continuum.

Linder, C. (2013). Disciplinary discourse, representation, and appresentation in the teaching and learning of science. European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 1(2), 43-49.

Norman, D. A. (1988). The psychology of everyday things. New York: Basic Books.

 

 

Keywords
Disciplinary affordance, learning, semiotics, science education
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-224424 (URN)
Conference
The 5th International 360 Conference. Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-05-12 Created: 2014-05-12 Last updated: 2017-01-25Bibliographically approved
Airey, J. & Urban, E. (2014). What do you see here?: Using an analysis of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in astronomy to create a survey of disciplinary discernment.. In: : . Paper presented at The first Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics, Lund, Sweden, 25-27 Sept 2014 (pp. 52-53).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do you see here?: Using an analysis of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in astronomy to create a survey of disciplinary discernment.
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Becoming part of a discipline involves learning to interpret and use a range of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources (Airey, 2009). These resources have been developed and assigned particular specialist meanings over time. Nowhere is this truer than in the sciences, where it is the norm that disciplinary-specific representations have been introduced and then refined by a number of different actors in order to reconcile them with subsequent empirical and theoretical advances. As a consequence, many of the semiotic resources used in the sciences today still retain some (potentially confusing) traces of their historical roots. However, it has been repeatedly shown that university lecturers underestimate the challenges such disciplinary specific semiotic resources may present to undergraduates (Northedge, 2002; Tobias, 1986).

In this paper we analyse one such disciplinary-specific semiotic resource from the field of Astronomy—the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. First, we audit the potential of this semiotic resource to provide access to disciplinary knowledge—what Fredlund et al (2012) have termed its disciplinary affordances. Our analysis includes consideration of the use of scales, labels, symbols, sizes and colour. We show how, for historical reasons, the use of these aspects in the resource may differ from what might be expected by a newcomer to the discipline. Using the results of our analysis we then created an online questionnaire to probe what is discerned (Eriksson, Linder, Airey, & Redfors, in press) with respect to each of these aspects by astronomers and physicists ranging from first year undergraduates to university professors.

Our findings suggest that some of the issues we highlight in our analysis may, in fact, be contributors to the alternative conceptions of undergraduate students and we therefore propose that lecturers pay particular attention to the disambiguation of these features for their students.

Keywords
Undergraduate learning, Astronomy, Physics, Graphs
National Category
Other Physics Topics Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233142 (URN)
Conference
The first Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics, Lund, Sweden, 25-27 Sept 2014
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-09-29 Created: 2014-09-29 Last updated: 2014-11-11Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, U., Linder, C., Airey, J. & Redfors, A. (2014). Who needs 3D when the Universe is flat?. Science Education, 98(3), 412-442
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who needs 3D when the Universe is flat?
2014 (English)In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 412-442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An overlooked feature in astronomy education is the need for students to learn to extrapolate three-dimensionality and the challenges that this may involve. Discerning critical features in the night sky that are embedded in dimensionality is a long-term learning process. Several articles have addressed the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) simulations in astronomy education, but they have neither addressed what students discern nor the nature of that discernment. A Web-based questionnaire was designed using links to video clips drawn from a simulation video of travel through our galaxy and beyond. The questionnaire was completed by 137 participants from nine countries across a broad span of astronomy education. The descriptions provided by the participants were analyzed using hermeneutics in combination with a constant comparative approach to formulate six categories of discernment in relation to multidimensionality. These results are used to make the case that the ability to extrapolate three-dimensionality calls for the creation of meaningful motion parallax experiences.

National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-224219 (URN)10.1002/sce.21109 (DOI)000337696000007 ()
Available from: 2014-05-06 Created: 2014-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6638-1246

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