Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Back Danielsson, Ing-MarieORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1549-582x
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Arwill-Nordbladh, E. & Back Danielsson, I.-M. (2021). Affective interventions and ‘the hegemonic other’ in runestones from Västergötland and Södermanland, Sweden. Current Swedish Archaeology, 29(1), 155-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affective interventions and ‘the hegemonic other’ in runestones from Västergötland and Södermanland, Sweden
2021 (English)In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 155-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the eleventh century AD, the Scandinavian countries were in the final stage of the process of conversion to Christianity. Local and regional processes of negotiations towards a Christian hegemony took various courses in different parts of Scandinavia. There are few substantial indications that social tensions resulted in violence. Rather, archaeological evidence indicates a gradual change. This paper highlights how these processes of negotiations were expressed by counter-hegemonic groups that took advantage of the affective affordances of runestones. By raising specific runestones, these non-Christian groups were part of an agonistic political process, as described by the political philosopher Chantal Mouffe.

Keywords
agonistics, Mouffe, affect, affective styles, affective communities, political negotiations, relational ontology
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-455964 (URN)10.37718/CSA.2021.12 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-10-13 Created: 2021-10-13 Last updated: 2022-01-26Bibliographically approved
Dawson, I., Back Danielsson, I.-M., Jones, A. M., Minkin, L. & Reilly, P. (2021). Diffracting Digital Images in the Making. Visual Resources, 37(1), 31-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diffracting Digital Images in the Making
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Visual Resources, ISSN 0197-3762, E-ISSN 1477-2809, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a diffractive dialogue between ethnographic accounts of imagery, digital or computational imaging, and art and archaeology practices. It develops the notion of images in the making in the context of the digital domain, to discuss what an image is and can be today. It focusses on two digital imaging techniques developed within archaeology and cultural heritage – Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) and Structure from Motion photogrammetry (SfM) – exploring how these techniques play out in heritage and art world contexts and practices. The paper highlights digital images as unstable compositions, and explores how digital images in the making enable us to reconsider the shifting temporal character of the image, and discuss the way in which the digital image forces us to disrupt the representational assumptions bound up in the relationship between the virtual and the actual. The authors argue that the diffractive moments in these encounters between archaeology and art practice disclose the potential of digital imaging to recursively question the complex ontological composition of images and the ability of images to act and affect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Digital images, imaging, artworks, diffraction, RTI, SfM, Reflectance Transformation Imaging, Structure from Motion Photogrammetry, Ontology, Archaeology, Imagery, Art practices
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-433737 (URN)10.1080/01973762.2022.2123629 (DOI)000865634800001 ()2-s2.0-85139875748 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-01 Created: 2021-02-01 Last updated: 2023-04-05Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. & Jones, A. M. (Eds.). (2020). Images in the Making: Art, Process, Archaeology. Manchester: Manchester University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Images in the Making: Art, Process, Archaeology
2020 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book presents a study of material images and asks how an appreciation of the making and unfolding of images and art alters archaeological accounts of prehistoric and historic societies. With contributions focusing on case studies ranging from prehistoric Britain, Scandinavia, Iberia, the Americas, and Dynastic Egypt, and including contemporary reflections on material images, it makes a novel contribution to ongoing debates relating to archaeological art and images. The book offers a new materialist analysis of archaeological imagery, with an emphasis on considering the material character of images and their making and unfolding. The book reassesses the predominantly representational paradigm of archaeological image analysis and argues for the importance of considering the ontology of images. It considers images as processes or events and introduces the verb ‘imaging’ to underline the point that images are conditions of possibility that draw together differing aspects of the world. The book is divided into three sections ‘Emergent Images’ which focuses on practices of making; ‘Images as Process’ which examines the making and role of images in prehistoric societies; and, ‘Unfolding Images’ which focuses on how images change as they are made and circulated. The book features contributions from archaeologists, Egyptologists, anthropologists and artists. The contributors to the book highlight the multiple role of images in prehistoric and historic societies, demonstrating that archaeologists need to recognize the dynamic and changeable character of images.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020. p. 350
Series
Social Archaeology and Material Worlds
Keywords
Archaeology, art, process, making
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390629 (URN)978-1-5261-4284-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2020-05-20Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. & Jones, A. M. (2020). Introduction. In: Ing-Marie Back Danielsson & Andrew Meirion Jones (Ed.), Images in the making: Art, process, archaeology. Manchester: Manchester University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2020 (English)In: Images in the making: Art, process, archaeology / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson & Andrew Meirion Jones, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This introduction addresses and challenges long held assumptions concerning archaeological art and images, and offers new ways to approach and understand them. It is less concerned with the thorny question of defining art, and instead primarily focus on images. We develop approaches that enable us to follow images in their making, their unfolding, their transformation, their multiplicity. We also discuss how images can be understood, given that they appear to be in constant motion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020
Series
Social Archaeology and Material Worlds
Keywords
Images, ontology, process, making
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390631 (URN)978-1-5261-4284-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2021-01-26Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. (2019). Art as entangled material practices: The Case of Late Iron Age Scandinavian Gold Foil Figures in the Making. In: Dragos Gheorghiu, Theodor Barth (Ed.), Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research: (pp. 21-30). Oxford: Archaeopress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Art as entangled material practices: The Case of Late Iron Age Scandinavian Gold Foil Figures in the Making
2019 (English)In: Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu, Theodor Barth, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2019, p. 21-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses Late Iron Age gold foil figures from Scandinavia. The figures can be described as tiny humanoid beings stamped on very thin gold foil. They date to c. AD 550–800, and are commonly interpreted in representationalist ways, and as being symbols. By contrast, this paper starts from the assumption that art and imagery are simultaneously material, affective and emergent. As a consequence the gold foil figures are seen as to be continuously in the making, where Karen Barad’s concepts of intra-action and agential realist ontology are especially helpful to illuminate the open-ended and generative character of the figures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Archaeopress, 2019
Keywords
Imagery, art, Barad, humanoid figures
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377177 (URN)978-1-78969-140-5 (ISBN)978-1-78969-141-2 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2019-02-15 Created: 2019-02-15 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. (2019). Images in the Making. In: Ljung, C., Sjögren, L., Berg, I., Engström, E., Hållans-Stenholm, A.-M.,Jonsson, K.,Klevnäs, A.,Qviström, L. and Zachrisson, T. (Ed.), Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén. (pp. 147-149). Lund: Nordic Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Images in the Making
2019 (English)In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén. / [ed] Ljung, C., Sjögren, L., Berg, I., Engström, E., Hållans-Stenholm, A.-M.,Jonsson, K.,Klevnäs, A.,Qviström, L. and Zachrisson, T., Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2019, p. 147-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The article discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures of the Vendel Period (c. AD 550-800) through the lense of Karen Barad's concepts of intra-action and phenomenon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019
Keywords
Guldgubbar, Järnåldern, intra-action
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388638 (URN)978-91-88909-12-1 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2020-03-26Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. (2017). Review of Ruth M. Van Dyke, ed. Practicing Materiality, Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2015. [Review]. European Journal of Archaeology, 20(1), 168-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review of Ruth M. Van Dyke, ed. Practicing Materiality, Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2015.
2017 (Swedish)In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 168-171Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017
Keywords
Materiality, van Dyke
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315227 (URN)10.1017/eaa.2016.13 (DOI)000395410300008 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2017-02-10 Created: 2017-02-10 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. (2016). Estrid - moder, mäktig och maskulin?: Berättelser om en rekonstruktion av en senvikingatida kvinna. In: Anna Bohlin och Lena Gemzöe (Ed.), Fiktion och verklighet: Mångvetenskapliga möten (pp. 195-210). Göteborg - Stockholm: Makadam Förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estrid - moder, mäktig och maskulin?: Berättelser om en rekonstruktion av en senvikingatida kvinna
2016 (Swedish)In: Fiktion och verklighet: Mångvetenskapliga möten / [ed] Anna Bohlin och Lena Gemzöe, Göteborg - Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 195-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates the stories that unfold and are created after an excavation in 1990s in Sweden of a few Late Viking Age burials. The excavation is followed by excavation reports, articles and an exhibition that also showcases a reconstruction made of one of the buried persons. The analysis is made from three perspectives; from the archaeological, the museum and the municipality. It is demonstrated that the stories presented on different levels contain both fictional and factual components. By acknowledging this, it is argued, it is possible for everyone to become involved in the interpretations and discussions of the past. The research paper appears in an inter-disciplinary book where several researchers from different academic disciplines investigate what is fiction and what is reality in a variety of societal areas, and how the relationship between the two concepts fiction and reality is full of tensions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg - Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2016
Keywords
Vikingatid, rekonstruktioner, museum
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311581 (URN)978-91-7061-198-8 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. (2016). More Theory for Mortuary Research of the Viking World. European Journal of Archaeology, 19(3), 519-531
Open this publication in new window or tab >>More Theory for Mortuary Research of the Viking World
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 519-531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This themed journal issue provides many examples of ways forward in the study of death and memory in the Viking world. While all contributions demonstrate that there are exciting new ways to study remains from funerary contexts that focus on different forms of citation involving material culture and monuments, this article will very briefly discuss dimensions that have not been addressed here. Specifically, it showcases how the mortuary citations approach can also use post-humanist theory for further development and exploration of mortuary practices in the Viking world. Although short, this article discusses rune stones, particularly rune stones with kuml inscriptions, which I have examined elsewhere.

The term kuml appears on contemporary rune stones; it refers to different material entities such as rune stones, mounds/cairns, and other standing stones. The being and becoming of kuml is briefly discussed through the concepts of intra-action and agential cuts championed by Karen Barad.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Viking period, rune stones, kuml, Barad, intra-action, agential cuts
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298750 (URN)10.1080/14619571.2016.1187976 (DOI)000380168400008 ()
External cooperation:
Funder
Swedish Research Council, INCA 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2016-07-06 Created: 2016-07-06 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Back Danielsson, I.-M. (2016). The Social Qualia of Kuml: An Exploration of the Iconicity of Rune-stones with Kuml Inscriptions from the Scandinavian Late Viking Age. Current Swedish Archaeology, 23, 157-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Social Qualia of Kuml: An Exploration of the Iconicity of Rune-stones with Kuml Inscriptions from the Scandinavian Late Viking Age
2016 (English)In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 23, p. 157-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses qualitative experiences (qualia) of Scandinavian Late Viking Age runestones from a semiotically theorized perspective. Rune-stones with kuml inscriptions receive particular attention. Despite the fact that kuml referred to different material entities, such as rune-stone, other standing stones, and/or grave, it is suggested that they resembled one another on iconic grounds. The quality associated with the multiple qualia was a sensation of safety that resulted in shared experiences that had positive social values. The article demonstrates that the semiotics of Peirce can be of great value to archaeologists who want to delve deeper into the social analysis of things.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2016
Keywords
rune-stones, kuml, qualitative experiences, qualia, Peirce, semiotics, Munn, body
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280473 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6444EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA600398
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Projects
What do gold foil couples want? A critical posthumanist study of Late Iron Age gold foil couples and their central places in Middle Sweden and Norway [2014-06444_VR]; Uppsala UniversityArchaeological Imagery as Works of Art– Changing Perspectives and Paradigms (workshop) [F17-1106:1_RJ]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1549-582x

Search in DiVA

Show all publications