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Larm, Peter
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Larm, P., Raninen, J., Åslund, C., Svensson, J. & Nilsson, K. W. (2019). The increased trend of non-drinking alcohol among adolescents: what role do internet activities have?. European Journal of Public Health, 29(1), 27-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The increased trend of non-drinking alcohol among adolescents: what role do internet activities have?
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recently, an increased trend toward non-drinking among adolescents has been observed in several countries. The aim of the present study is to evaluate a common suggestion in literature, that adolescents do not drink alcohol because they spend more time on the internet, monitored at home, by examining associations between internet activities (social media/chatting and computer gaming) and non-drinking.

Methods: A health questionnaire was distributed to all 9th graders (1516 years) in a mid-sized Swedish county in 2008, 2010 and 2012. In total, 7089 students returned the questionnaire.

Results: In contrast to the suggestion, no association was found between total time spent on computers and non-drinking. Social media/chatting was robustly associated with a decreased probability of non-drinking across the three survey years. On the other hand, computer gaming during weekends only (OR = 1.74, CI = 1.132.69) or both on weekdays and weekends increased the probability of non-drinking (OR = 1.82, CI = 1.312.54) in 2012 only. However, neither social media/chatting nor computer gaming was associated with the increased trend of non-drinking from 2008 to 2012.

Conclusions: Internet activities were in general not associated with non-drinking among adolescents aged 1516 years in Sweden. Although, a weak positive association between computer gaming and non-drinking was found in 2012, this effect benefited the vast majority of the boys. The larger alcohol use among those with extensive social media use/chatting may indicate that these online platforms are arenas where adolescents are exposed for positive alcohol preferences and alcohol advertising without parental supervision.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381843 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky168 (DOI)000462576700007 ()30169631 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00857
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Åslund, C., Raninen, J. & Nilsson, K. W. (2018). Adolescent non-drinkers: Who are they? Social relations, school performance, lifestyle factors and health behaviours. Drug and Alcohol Review, 37(S1), S67-S75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent non-drinkers: Who are they? Social relations, school performance, lifestyle factors and health behaviours
2018 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 37, no S1, p. S67-S75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Aims

Traditionally, non-drinking adults or young adults have been associated with health deficits rather than health benefits. However, as the proportion of Swedish non-drinking adolescents has doubled since 2000, their health profiles are of interest. The aim of the present study is to examine whether social relations, school characteristics, lifestyle factors or health behaviours distinguish adolescent non-drinkers from adolescent drinkers, and if their health profiles have changed from 2004 to 2012.

Design and Methods

Data from the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland, a health survey biennially distributed to all 9th graders (15-16years) in a medium-sized Swedish county, was used. In total, 2872 students in 2004 and 2045 students in 2012 were included.

Results

Non-drinkers were distinguished from drinkers in both 2004 and 2012 by elevated parental supervision, a lower rate of school truancy and lower rates of cannabis use, use of other illicit drugs, daily smoking and lower scores on antisocial behaviour, but more problems of getting new friends. No differences between 2004 and 2012 were found.

Discussion and Conclusions

Non-drinkers presented more adaptive and healthier behaviours than their drinking peers, but it is difficult to determine whether their health benefits were related to their improved alcohol status or to the more general trend towards adaptation that occurred from 2004 to 2012 among adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
adolescence, alcohol, non-drinkers, health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356810 (URN)10.1111/dar.12640 (DOI)000431986800009 ()29218748 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00857Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Lindner, P., Flodin, P., Larm, P., Budhiraja, M., Savic-Berglund, I., Jokinen, J., . . . Hodgins, S. (2018). Amygdala-orbitofrontal structural and functional connectivity in females with anxiety disorders, with and without a history of conduct disorder. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 1101.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amygdala-orbitofrontal structural and functional connectivity in females with anxiety disorders, with and without a history of conduct disorder
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 1101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conduct disorder (CD) and anxiety disorders (ADs) are often comorbid and both are characterized by hyper-sensitivity to threat, and reduced structural and functional connectivity between the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Previous studies of CD have not taken account of ADs nor directly compared connectivity in the two disorders. We examined three groups of young women: 23 presenting CD and lifetime AD; 30 presenting lifetime AD and not CD; and 17 with neither disorder (ND). Participants completed clinical assessments and diffusion-weighted and resting-state functional MRI scans. The uncinate fasciculus was reconstructed using tractography and manual dissection, and structural measures extracted. Correlations of resting-state activity between amygdala and OFC seeds were computed. The CD + AD and AD groups showed similarly reduced structural integrity of the left uncinate compared to ND, even after adjusting for IQ, psychiatric comorbidity, and childhood maltreatment. Uncinate integrity was associated with harm avoidance traits among AD-only women, and with the interaction of poor anger control and anxiety symptoms among CD + AD women. Groups did not differ in functional connectivity. Reduced uncinate integrity observed in CD + AD and AD-only women may reflect deficient emotion regulation in response to threat, common to both disorders, while other neural mechanisms determine the behavioral response.

National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343674 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-19569-7 (DOI)000422739300064 ()29348532 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Lindner, P., Flodin, P., Larm, P., Budhiraja, M., Savic, I., Jokinen, J., . . . Hodgins, S. (2017). Disentangling Associations between Antisocial Behavior and Anxiety Disorders with Amygdala-Orbitofrontal Functional and Structural Connectivity in Females. Paper presented at 72nd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 18-20, 2017, San Diego, CA. Biological Psychiatry, 81(10), S98-S98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disentangling Associations between Antisocial Behavior and Anxiety Disorders with Amygdala-Orbitofrontal Functional and Structural Connectivity in Females
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2017 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 81, no 10, p. S98-S98Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Keywords
Anxiety Disorder, Conduct Disorder, white matter integrity, Fronto-limbic Connectivity, Amygdala
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331806 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.02.253 (DOI)000400348700240 ()
Conference
72nd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 18-20, 2017, San Diego, CA
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Stockholm County Council
Available from: 2017-10-19 Created: 2017-10-19 Last updated: 2017-10-19Bibliographically approved
Asp, M., Simonsson, B., Larm, P. & Molarius, A. (2017). Physical mobility, physical activity, and obesity among elderly: findings from a large population-based Swedish survey. Public Health, 147, 84-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical mobility, physical activity, and obesity among elderly: findings from a large population-based Swedish survey
2017 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 147, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine how physical activity and physical mobility are related to obesity in the elderly.

Study design: A cross-sectional study of 2558 men and women aged 65 years and older who participated in a population survey in 2012 was conducted in mid-Sweden with an overall response rate of 67%.

Methods: Obesity (body mass index >= 30 kg/m(2)) was based on self-reported weight and height, and physical activity and physical mobility on questionnaire data. Chi-squared test and multiple logistic regressions were used as statistical analyses.

Results: The overall prevalence of obesity was 19% in women and 15% in men and decreased after the age of 75 years. A strong association between both physical activity and obesity, and physical mobility and obesity was found. The odds for obesity were higher for impaired physical mobility (odds ratio [OR] 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.14-3.75) than for physical inactivity (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.28-2.08) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status and fruit and vegetable intake. However, physical activity was associated with obesity only among elderly with physical mobility but not among those with impaired physical mobility.

Conclusion: It is important to focus on making it easier for elderly with physical mobility to become or stay physically active, whereas elderly with impaired physical mobility have a higher prevalence of obesity irrespective of physical activity.

Keywords
Physical mobility, Physical activity, Obesity, Elderly, Population studies, Sweden
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332210 (URN)10.1016/j.puhe.2017.01.032 (DOI)000405833500015 ()28404503 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Asp, M., Simonsson, B., Larm, P. & Molarius, A. (2017). The association between physical activity and obesity differs by physical mobility among elderly. European Journal of Public Health, 27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between physical activity and obesity differs by physical mobility among elderly
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345675 (URN)000414389804173 ()
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Åslund, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2017). The role of online social network chatting for alcohol use in adolescence: Testing three peer-related pathways in a Swedish population-based sample. Computers in human behavior, 71, 284-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of online social network chatting for alcohol use in adolescence: Testing three peer-related pathways in a Swedish population-based sample
2017 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 71, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to examine whether online social network chatting (OSNC) is related to any of three peer-related pathways to alcohol use among adolescents including a stress-exposure pathway, a peer status pathway and a social context pathway. A survey was distributed to a Swedish population based sample of 2439 boys and girls 15-16 years old enrolled in the 9th grade of primary school. Indirect effects, moderating effects, and gender differences were analysed. The results exposed a robust positive association between OSNC and alcohol use, but also that OSNC accounted for one-fifth of the association between the peer status pathway and alcohol use. A positive association between the stress exposure pathway and alcohol use was found that was weaker among adolescents who scored high on OSNC whereas a positive association between the social context pathway and alcohol use also was found that was stronger among adolescents who scored high on OSNC. Consequently, OSNC may contribute differently to alcohol use depending on which peer-related pathway that the adolescent follows. The robust positive association between OSNC and alcohol use that remained when the three peer-related pathways were accounted for also indicates that this association is accounted for by other factors.

Keywords
Internet, Adolescence, Alcohol drinking, Cross-sectional studies
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322079 (URN)10.1016/j.chb.2017.02.012 (DOI)000399511000030 ()
Funder
The Swedish Brain FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-05-19 Created: 2017-05-19 Last updated: 2017-05-19Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Åslund, C., Starrin, B. & Nilson, K. W. (2016). How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use?: Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(5), 525-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use?: Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study examined whether social capital and a sense of coherence are associated with hazardous alcohol use in a large population-based Swedish sample. In particular, the objectives were (a) to examine which of five subdimensions of social capital is associated with hazardous alcohol use, (b) to investigate the moderating role of sense of coherence and (c) to examine possible sex differences. Methods: A postal survey was distributed to a sample of respondents (aged 18-84 years) from five Swedish counties that was stratified by sex, age and city; 40,674 (59.2%) participants responded, of which 45.5% were men and 54.5% were women with a mean +/- SD age of 53.8 +/- 17.9 years. Results: Structural dimensions of social capital were associated with an increased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women, whereas the increased probability associated with cognitive dimensions occurred mostly among women. Sense of coherence was robustly associated with a decreased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women. There were few moderating effects of sense of coherence and sex differences emerged mainly for the cognitive dimension of social capital. Conclusions: Associations between social capital dimensions and hazardous alcohol use were partly sex-specific, whereas the benefits of a sense of coherence accrued to both sexes. Social capital dimensions and sense of coherence were generally unrelated to each other. Only associations between the cognitive dimensions of social capital and hazardous alcohol use differed by sex.

Keywords
Sweden, social capital, sense of coherence, hazardous alcohol use, sex differences
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299036 (URN)10.1177/1403494816645221 (DOI)000377349500010 ()27113963 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2016-07-13 Created: 2016-07-13 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Silva, T. C. & Hodgins, S. (2015). Adolescent Substance Misusers with and without Delinquency: Death, Mental and Physical Disorders, and Criminal Convictions from Age 21 to 45. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 59, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent Substance Misusers with and without Delinquency: Death, Mental and Physical Disorders, and Criminal Convictions from Age 21 to 45
2015 (English)In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, ISSN 0740-5472, E-ISSN 1873-6483, Vol. 59, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about adult outcomes of males who as adolescents sought treatment for alcohol misuse or drug use, and who additionally were engaging or not engaging in other forms of delinquency. Since the rates of negative outcomes vary in the general population, the study determined whether the sub-groups of clinic attendees fared differently as compared to males of the same age who had not sought treatment for substance misuse from age 21 to 45. Adolescent males who consulted the only substance misuse clinic in a Swedish city between 1968 and1971 were divided into four groups: ALCOHOL no drug use, no criminal offending (n = 52); ALCOHOL + D no drug use, plus criminal offending (n = 105); DRUG use, no criminal offending (n = 92); and DRUG + D plus criminal offending (n = 474). These four groups were compared to a general population sample (GP) of males matched on age and birthplace, who did not seek treatment for SM in adolescence. National Swedish registers provided data on death, hospitalizations for substance misuse (SM), mental and physical disorders, and criminal convictions. Compared to the GP, and after controlling for co-occurring adult outcomes, ALCOHOL showed elevated risks for SM hospitalization and convictions for violent crimes, and DRUG showed elevated risks for SM hospitalization, convictions for non-violent crimes, and hospitalization for psychosis. ALCOHOL + D and DRUG + D showed increased risk for SM hospitalization, violent and non-violent convictions, and DRUG + D additionally, for death, and hospitalizations for psychosis and physical illness. Misuse of alcohol without drug use or other delinquency in adolescence was associated with increased risk for convictions for violent crimes during the subsequent 25 years, in addition to SM, while adolescent drug use without other forms of delinquency was associated with increased risks for convictions for non-violent crimes, hospitalizations for SM, and non-affective psychosis. Cannabis use, with and without delinquency, was associated with subsequent hospitalization for non-affective psychosis. Consistent with contemporary studies, most adolescents treated for SM from 1968-1971 presented delinquency that was associated with an increase in risk of all adverse outcomes to age 45.

Keywords
Negative outcomes, Adolescents, Alcohol misuse, Drug use, Cannabis, Psychosis
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268765 (URN)10.1016/j.jsat.2015.06.009 (DOI)000364355100001 ()26342514 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County Council
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Lövenhag, S., Larm, P., Åslund, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2015). Antisocial behavior reduces the association between subdimensions of ADHD symptoms and alcohol use in a large population-based sample of adolescents. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(5), 489-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antisocial behavior reduces the association between subdimensions of ADHD symptoms and alcohol use in a large population-based sample of adolescents
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 489-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of antisocial behavior on reducing the association between subdimensions of ADHD symptoms (inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity) and alcohol use. Boys and girls were analyzed separately using a population-based Swedish adolescent sample. A randomly selected cross-sectional survey was performed in secondary and upper secondary schools in Vastmanland County during 2010. Participants were a population of 2,439 15-16 year-olds and 1,425 17-18 year-olds (1,947 girls and 1,917 boys). Psychosocial adversity, antisocial behaviors, symptoms of ADHD and alcohol use were assessed by questionnaires. Except for girls' inattention, subdimensions of ADHD symptoms were not associated with alcohol use when variance due to antisocial behavior was accounted for. Among boys, instead of an indirect effect of antisocial behavior on the association between impulsivity and alcohol use, a moderating effect was found. Among girls, the inattention component of ADHD was independently associated with alcohol use even when adjusted for antisocial behavior. The reduced associations between symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and alcohol use for boys and girls after adjusting for antisocial behavior suggest a considerable overlap between hyperactivity, impulsivity, and antisocial behavior. The direct pathway between inattention and alcohol use among girls suggests that girls with inattention symptoms are at risk of alcohol use regardless of antisocial behavior. Special attention should be given to these girls. Accounting for antisocial behavior reduced the relation between subdimensions of ADHD symptoms and alcohol use, and antisocial behaviors should therefore be screened for when symptoms of ADHD are present.

Keywords
Adolescent, ADHD, alcohol, antisocial behavior
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269274 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12234 (DOI)000364596100004 ()26094652 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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