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Publications (10 of 119) Show all publications
Juvrud, J., Rennels, J. L., Kayl, A. J., Gredebäck, G. & Herlitz, A. (2019). Attention during Visual Preference Tasks: Relation to Caregiving and Face Recognition. Infancy, 24(3), 356-367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention during Visual Preference Tasks: Relation to Caregiving and Face Recognition
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2019 (English)In: Infancy, ISSN 1525-0008, E-ISSN 1532-7078, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 356-367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research examined how caregiver experience (female primary caregiver or distributed caregiving with mom and dad) influenced 10-, 14-, and 16-month-olds' visual preferences and attention toward internal facial features of female-male face pairs, and how these behaviors related to novelty preferences in a face recognition task and speed and accuracy on a visual search task. In the visual preference task, infants visually preferred male faces, regardless of caregiver experience. Despite similarities in visual preferences, infants' attention toward females and males' internal facial features was related for infants with distributed caregiving only. Infants' performance across face processing tasks most often correlated for those with female primary caregivers. Results further our understanding of how infants with female primary caregivers display specialized processing of female faces, and how infants with distributed caregiving show similarities in their attention to female and male facial features.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382379 (URN)10.1111/infa.12285 (DOI)000463026200004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2012.0120
Available from: 2019-04-25 Created: 2019-04-25 Last updated: 2019-04-25Bibliographically approved
Lindskog, M., Rogell, M., Kenward, B. & Gredebäck, G. (2019). Discrimination of Small Forms in a Deviant-Detection Paradigm by 10-month-old Infants. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 1032.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discrimination of Small Forms in a Deviant-Detection Paradigm by 10-month-old Infants
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1032Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using eye tracking, we investigated if 10-month-old infants could discriminate between members of a set of small forms based on geometric properties in a deviant-detection paradigm, as suggested by the idea of a core cognitive system for Euclidian geometry. We also investigated the precision of infants’ ability to discriminate as well as how the discrimination process unfolds over time. Our results show that infants can discriminate between small forms based on geometrical properties, but only when the difference is sufficiently large. Furthermore, our results also show that it takes infants, on average, <3.5 s to detect a deviant form. Our findings extend previous research in three ways: by showing that infants can make similar discriminative judgments as children and adults with respect to geometric properties; by providing a first crude estimate on the limit of the discriminative abilities in infants, and finally; by providing a first demonstration of how the discrimination process unfolds over time.

Keywords
geometry, eye-tracking, infants, deviant-detection, small forms
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383453 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01032 (DOI)000467849200001 ()31156498 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2012.0120Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0430:1
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Astor, K. & Gredebäck, G. (2019). Gaze following in 4.5- and 6-month-old infants: The impact of proximity on standard gaze following performance tests. Paper presented at International Congress of Infant Studies (ICIS), 2018/12/18. Infancy, 24(1), 79-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gaze following in 4.5- and 6-month-old infants: The impact of proximity on standard gaze following performance tests
2019 (English)In: Infancy, ISSN 1525-0008, E-ISSN 1532-7078, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gaze following (GF), the ability to synchronize visual attention with others, is often considered a foundation of social cognition. In this study, GF was assessed while changing the space between an actor's eyes and the gaze target. This was done to address a potential confound in the gold standard GF performance test, namely the spatial bias of the actors? eye position that occurs when the actor turns the head to look at a target, offsetting the eye position from a centered position toward the attended target. Our results suggest that both 4.5 (n = 27) and 6 (n = 30)-month-old infants can follow an actor's gaze regardless of proximity. This is the first demonstration that early GF is not dependent on proximity cues, and our results strengthen previous findings suggesting that GF develops well before 6 months of age. The study was preregistered, and all data and analysis routines can be downloaded with provided links.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-370000 (URN)10.1111/infa.12261 (DOI)000454512000006 ()
Conference
International Congress of Infant Studies (ICIS), 2018/12/18
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2012.0120
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Juvrud, J., Bakker, M., Kaduk, K., DeValk, J. M., Gredebäck, G. & Kenward, B. (2019). Longitudinal Continuity in Understanding and Production of Giving-Related Behavior From Infancy to Childhood. Child Development, 90(2), e182-e191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal Continuity in Understanding and Production of Giving-Related Behavior From Infancy to Childhood
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2019 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 2, p. e182-e191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Infants have an early understanding of giving (the transfer of an item by one agent to another), but little is known about individual differences in these abilities or their developmental outcomes. Here, 9-month-olds (N = 59) showing clearer neural processing (Event-related potential, ERP) of a give-me gesture also evidenced a stronger reaction (pupil dilation) to an inappropriate response to a give-me gesture, and at 2 years were more likely to give in response to a give-me gesture. None of the differences in understanding and production of giving-related behaviors were associated with other sociocognitive variables investigated: language, gaze-following, and nongiving helping. The early developmental continuity in understanding and production of giving behavior is consistent with the great importance of giving for humans throughout the life span.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-370001 (URN)10.1111/cdev.13131 (DOI)000460664900001 ()30102423 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Balkenius, C., Fawcett, C., Falck-Ytter, T., Gredebäck, G. & Johansson, B. (2019). Pupillary Correlates of Emotion and Cognition: A Computational Model. In: 2019 9th International IEEE/EMBS Conference On Neural Engineering (NER): . Paper presented at 9th IEEE/EMBS International Conference on Neural Engineering (NER), MAR 20-23, 2019, San Francisco, CA (pp. 903-907). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pupillary Correlates of Emotion and Cognition: A Computational Model
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2019 (English)In: 2019 9th International IEEE/EMBS Conference On Neural Engineering (NER), IEEE, 2019, p. 903-907Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In addition to controlling the influx of light to the retina, the pupil also reacts as a result of cognitive and emotional processing. This makes it possible to use pupil dilation as an index for cognitive effort and emotional arousal. We show how an extended version of a computational model of pupil dilation can account for pupillary contagion effects where the pupil of an observer dilates upon seeing another person with dilated pupils. We also show how the model can reproduce the effects of cognitive effort in a math exercise. Furthermore, we investigate how the model can account for different explanations for the abnormal pupil response seen in individuals with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder. The reported computer simulations illustrate the usefulness of system-level models of the brain in addressing complex cognitive and emotional phenomena.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2019
Series
International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, ISSN 1948-3546
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387991 (URN)000469933200220 ()978-1-5386-7921-0 (ISBN)
Conference
9th IEEE/EMBS International Conference on Neural Engineering (NER), MAR 20-23, 2019, San Francisco, CA
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC StG CACTUS 312292
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Del Bianco, T., Falck-Ytter, T., Thorup, E. & Gredebäck, G. (2019). The Developmental Origins of Gaze-Following in Human Infants. Infancy, 24(3), 433-454
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Developmental Origins of Gaze-Following in Human Infants
2019 (English)In: Infancy, ISSN 1525-0008, E-ISSN 1532-7078, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 433-454Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the first year of life, infants develop the capacity to follow the gaze of others. This behavior allows sharing attention and facilitates language acquisition and cognitive development. This article reviews studies that investigated gaze-following before 12 months of age in typically developing infants and discusses current theoretical perspectives on early GF. Recent research has revealed that early GF is highly dependent on situational constraints and individual characteristics, but theories that describe the underlying mechanisms have partly failed to consider this complexity. We propose a novel framework termed the perceptual narrowing account of GF that may have the potential to integrate existing theoretical accounts.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369998 (URN)10.1111/infa.12276 (DOI)000463026200008 ()
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Truedsson, E., Fawcett, C., Wesevich, V., Gredebäck, G. & Wåhlstedt, C. (2019). The Role of Callous-Unemotional Traits on Adolescent Positive and Negative Emotional Reactivity: A Longitudinal Community-Based Study. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 573.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Callous-Unemotional Traits on Adolescent Positive and Negative Emotional Reactivity: A Longitudinal Community-Based Study
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 573Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Callous-unemotional (CU) traits are associated with lower emotional reactivity in adolescents. However, since previous studies have focused mainly on reactivity to negative stimuli, it is unclear whether reactivity to positive stimuli is also affected. Further, few studies have addressed the link between CU traits and emotional reactivity in longitudinal community samples, which is important for determining its generalizability and developmental course. In the current study, pupil dilation and self-ratings of arousal and valence were assessed in 100 adolescents (15-17 years) from a community sample, while viewing images with negative and positive valence from the International Affective Pictures System (ZAPS). Behavioral traits (CU) were assessed concurrently, as well as at ages 12-15, and 8-9 (subsample, n = 68, low levels of prosocial behavior were used as a proxy for CU traits). The results demonstrate that CU traits assessed at ages 12-15 and 8-9 predicted less pupil dilation to both positive and negative images at ages 15-17. Further, CU traits at ages 12-15 and concurrently were associated with less negative valence ratings for negative images and concurrently to less positive valence ratings for positive images. The current findings demonstrate that CU traits are related to lower emotional reactivity to both negative and positive stimuli in adolescents from a community sample.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2019
Keywords
callous-unemotional traits, emotional reactivity, pupil dilation, longitudinal, community sample
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380439 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00573 (DOI)000461259600001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2012.0120
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Gottwald, J., Gredebäck, G. & Lindskog, M. (2019). Two-step actions in infancy—the TWAIN model. Experimental Brain Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two-step actions in infancy—the TWAIN model
2019 (English)In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we propose a novel model—the TWAIN model—to describe the durations of two-step actions in a reach-to-place task in human infants. Previous research demonstrates that infants and adults plan their actions across multiple steps. They adjust, for instance, the velocity of a reaching action depending on what they intend to do with the object once it is grasped. Despite these findings and irrespective of the larger context in which the action occurs, current models (e.g., Fitts’ law) target single, isolated actions, as, for example, pointing to a goal. In the current paper, we develop and empirically test a more ecologically valid model of two-step action planning. More specifically, 61 18-month olds took part in a reach-to-place task and their reaching and placing durations were measured with a motion-capture system. Our model explained the highest amount of variance in placing duration and outperformed six previously suggested models, when using model comparison. We show that including parameters of the first action step, here the duration of the reaching action, can improve the description of the second action step, here the duration of the placing action. This move towards more ecologically valid models of action planning contributes knowledge as well as a framework for assessing human machine interactions. The TWAIN model provides an updated way to quantify motor learning by the time these abilities develop, which might help to assess performance in typically developing human children.

National Category
Social Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390180 (URN)10.1007/s00221-019-05604-0 (DOI)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC-StG CACTUS 312292Swedish Research Council, VR-PG 2017-01504
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06
Gredebäck, G., Lindskog, M., Juvrud, J. C., Green, D. & Marciszko, C. (2018). Action Prediction Allows Hypothesis Testing via Internal Forward Models at 6 Months of Age. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 290.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Action Prediction Allows Hypothesis Testing via Internal Forward Models at 6 Months of Age
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We propose that action prediction provides a cornerstone in a learning process known as internal forward models. According to this suggestion infants' predictions (looking to the mouth of someone moving a spoon upward) will moments later be validated or proven false (spoon was in fact directed toward a bowl), information that is directly perceived as the distance between the predicted and actual goal. Using an individual difference approach we demonstrate that action prediction correlates with the tendency to react with surprise when social interactions are not acted out as expected (action evaluation). This association is demonstrated across tasks and in a large sample (n = 118) at 6 months of age. These results provide the first indication that infants might rely on internal forward models to structure their social world. Additional analysis, consistent with prior work and assumptions from embodied cognition, demonstrates that the latency of infants' action predictions correlate with the infant's own manual proficiency.

Keywords
internal model, pupil dilation, prediction, action, interaction, eye tracking
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350616 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00290 (DOI)000427194500001 ()
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-05-23Bibliographically approved
Fawcett, C., Arslan, M., Falck-Ytter, T., Roeyers, H. & Gredebäck, G. (2018). Author Correction: Human eyes with dilated pupils induce pupillary contagion in infants. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 4157.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Author Correction: Human eyes with dilated pupils induce pupillary contagion in infants
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 4157Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352923 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-22184-1 (DOI)000426469000002 ()29500403 (PubMedID)
Note

Correction to: Scientific Reports, 2017, vol. 7, article Number: 9601.

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-08223-3

WoS title: Human eyes with dilated pupils induce pupillary contagion in infants (vol 7, 2017)

Available from: 2018-06-08 Created: 2018-06-08 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3046-0043

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