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Hagerman, Heidi
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Hagerman, H., Högberg, H., Skytt, B., Wadensten, B. & Engström, M. (2017). Empowerment and performance of managers and subordinates in elderly care: A longitudinal and multilevel study. Journal of Nursing Management, 25(8), 647-656
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Empowerment and performance of managers and subordinates in elderly care: A longitudinal and multilevel study
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 647-656Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To investigate relationships between first-line managers' ratings of structural and psychological empowerment, and the subordinates' ratings of structural empowerment, as well as their ratings of the managers' leadership-management performance.

BACKGROUND: Work situations in elderly care are complex. To date, few studies have used a longitudinal, correlational and multilevel design to study the working life of subordinates and managers.

METHOD: In five Swedish municipalities, questionnaires were answered twice during 2010-12 by 56 first-line managers and 769 subordinates working in nursing homes or home-help services.

RESULTS: First-line managers' empowerment at Time 1 partially predicted subordinate's structural empowerment and ratings of their managers' leadership-management performance at Time 2. Changes over time partially revealed that the more access managers had to structural empowerment, i.e. increase over time, the higher the ratings were for structural empowerment and managerial leadership-management performance among subordinates.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings strengthen research and theoretical suggestions linking first-line managers' structural empowerment to their subordinates' structural empowerment and ratings of their manager's leadership-management performance.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers with high access to structural empowerment are more likely to provide subordinates access to structural empowerment.

Keywords
first-line manager, leadership-management performance, linear mixed model, structural and psychological empowerment, subordinate
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331770 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12504 (DOI)000414511300009 ()28714218 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Hagerman, H., Skytt, B., Wadensten, B., Högberg, H. & Engström, M. (2016). A longitudinal study of working life among first-line managers in the care of older adults. Applied Nursing Research, 32, 7-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of working life among first-line managers in the care of older adults
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2016 (English)In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 32, p. 7-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To study whether the number of subordinates plays a role in first-line managers' and subordinates' ratings of empowerment, stress symptoms, and leadership-management performance. The aim was also to study relationships between managers' empowerment and stress symptoms and leadership-management performance. Methods: A longitudinal and correlational design was used. All first-line managers (n = 98) and their subordinates (n = 2085) working in the care of older adults in five municipalities were approached. Results: With fewer (<= 30) subordinates per manager, there were higher ratings of structural empowerment among managers and subordinates and lower stress symptoms among subordinates, than with >= 31 subordinates. Furthermore, structural empowerment was related to the managers' stress symptoms and leadership management performance, mediated through psychological empowerment Moreover, structural empowerment can control/adjust for large numbers of subordinates in relation to stress symptoms. Conclusion: The higher FLMs rated their access to empowerment, the lower stress symptoms and higher leadership-management performance they rated over time.

Keywords
First-line manager, Leadership-management performance, Number of subordinates, Stress symptoms, Structural and psychological empowerment
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310763 (URN)10.1016/j.apnr.2016.03.003 (DOI)000388057100002 ()27969055 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Skytt, B., Hagerman, H., Strömberg, A. & Engström, M. (2015). First-line managers' descriptions and reflections regarding their staff's access to empowering structures. Journal of Nursing Management, 23(8), 1003-1010
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First-line managers' descriptions and reflections regarding their staff's access to empowering structures
2015 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1003-1010Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To elucidate first-line managers' descriptions and reflections regarding their staff's access to empowering structures using Kanter's theory of structural empowerment.

BACKGROUND: Good structural conditions within workplaces are essential to employees' wellbeing, and their ability to access empowerment structures is largely dependent on the management.

METHOD: Twenty-eight first-line managers in elderly care were interviewed. Deductive qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data.

RESULTS: Managers perceived that staff had varying degrees of access to the empowering structures described in Kanter's theory - and that they possessed formal power in their roles as contact persons and representatives. The descriptions mostly started from the managers' own actions, although some started from the needs of staff members.

CONCLUSION: All managers described their staff's access to the empowering structures in Kanter's theory as important, yet it seemed as though this was not always reflected on and discussed as a strategic issue.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers could make use of performance and appraisal dialogues to keep up to date on staff's access to empowering structures. Recurrent discussions in the management group based on such current information could promote staff's access to power through empowering structures and make job definitions a strategic issue in the organisation.

Keywords
elderly care; first-line managers; staff; structural empowerment
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244390 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12246 (DOI)000368261600006 ()25059511 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2015-02-16 Created: 2015-02-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hagerman, H., Engström, M., Häggström, E., Wadensten, B. & Skytt, B. (2015). Male first-line managers' experiences of the work situation in elderly care: an empowerment perspective. Journal of Nursing Management, 23(6), 695-704
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Male first-line managers' experiences of the work situation in elderly care: an empowerment perspective
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 695-704Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe male first-line managers' experiences of their work situation in elderly care.

BACKGROUND: First-line managers' work is challenging. However, less attention has been paid to male managers' work situation in health care. Knowledge is needed to empower male managers.

METHOD: Fourteen male first-line managers were interviewed. The interview text was subjected to qualitative content analysis.

RESULT: Work situations were described as complex and challenging; challenges were the driving force. They talked about 'Being on one's own but not feeling left alone', 'Having freedom within set boundaries', 'Feeling a sense of satisfaction and stimulation', 'Feeling a sense of frustration' and 'Having a feeling of dejection and resignation'.

CONCLUSION: Although the male managers report deficiencies in the support structure, they largely experience their work as a positive challenge.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: To meet increasing challenges, male first-line managers need better access to supportive structural conditions. Better access to resources is needed in particular, allowing managers to be more visible for staff and to work with development and quality issues instead of administrative tasks. Regarding organisational changes and the scrutiny of management and the media, they lack and thus need support and information from superiors.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244392 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12197 (DOI)000360840300002 ()24283766 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-02-16 Created: 2015-02-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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