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Nordin, Jonas M.
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Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Nordin, J. M. (2018). Center of Diversity: Sami in Early Modern Stockholm in the Light of European Colonial Expansion. A Historical Archaeological Approach. International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 22(4), 663-685
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Center of Diversity: Sami in Early Modern Stockholm in the Light of European Colonial Expansion. A Historical Archaeological Approach
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Historical Archaeology, ISSN 1092-7697, E-ISSN 1573-7748, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 663-685Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper deals with the presence of Sami in central and southern Sweden in the seventeenth century. The Nordic countries have generally been believed to be ethnically homogeneous, with the** colonial subjects not being present in the center of these empires. If the multicultural aspects of early modern Nordic countries are at all discussed, Sami and other ethnic groups are understood as peoples living on the outskirts of the empires. This notion has cemented an idea that cities such as Copenhagen or Stockholm were inhabited solely by peoples from southern Scandinavia and the continent. Drawing on the experience of the role and presence of indigenous people from the Americas and the Arctic in cities such as London in the seventeenth century, this paper examines the multi-ethnic aspects of early modern Stockholm, capital of Sweden, as an imperial center.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Sami, Seventeenth century, Sweden, Colonialism, Ethnic diversity
National Category
Archaeology History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371118 (URN)10.1007/s10761-017-0430-5 (DOI)000450474000001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1917
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Nordin, J. M. & Ojala, C.-G. (2017). Copper Worlds: A historical archaeology of Abraham and Jakob Momma-Reenstierna and their industrial enterprise in the Torne River Valley, c. 1650-1680. Acta Borealia, 34(2), 103-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Copper Worlds: A historical archaeology of Abraham and Jakob Momma-Reenstierna and their industrial enterprise in the Torne River Valley, c. 1650-1680
2017 (English)In: Acta Borealia, ISSN 0800-3831, E-ISSN 1503-111X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 103-133Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses the industrial enterprise of the Dutch-born brothers Abraham and Jakob Momma-Reenstierna and their investments in Sápmi and the upper parts of the Torne River Valley, northern Sweden, during the second half of the seventeenth century. The aim is to explore the driving forces behind the industrial projects of the two brothers in a larger global and colonial context. With inspiration from recent critical studies on the simplifications, and Eurocentrism, in earlier understandings of the birth of modernity, we focus on the modernizing processes taking place in the upper part of the Torne River Valley as a meeting zone between local populations and landscapes and external capital. Metal extraction was booming in the seventeenth-century Sámi areas. Both the Danish-Norwegian and the Swedish Crowns invested heavily in the mining of silver, copper and iron. The scientific focus in archaeology and history has hitherto been very much on the state-governed projects, and limited interest has been directed towards the private enterprises. Moreover, there is also a need to study the roles of the local Finnish and Sámi populations, as well as the global connections, in these colonial industrial projects.

Keywords
Seventeenth century, colonialism, modernity, copper industry, mining, mines, works, Dutch industrialists, Sápmi, Sámi, Torne River Valley, Kengis, 1600-tal, kolonialism, modernitet, koppar, industrialism, gruvor, bruk, nederländska, industrialister, Sápmi, samer, Tornedalen, Kengis
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334538 (URN)10.1080/08003831.2017.1397397 (DOI)000418924000001 ()
Projects
A Colonial Arena: Landscape, People and Globalization in Inland Northern Sweden in the Early Modern Period
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-1475
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
Monié Nordin, J. & Ojala, C.-G. (2015). Collecting Sápmi: Early modern collecting of Sámi material culture. Nordisk Museologi, 2, 114-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collecting Sápmi: Early modern collecting of Sámi material culture
2015 (English)In: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, Vol. 2, p. 114-122Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the research project Collecting Sápmi. Early modern globalization of Sámi material culture and Sámi cultural heritage today, financed by the Swedish Research Council 2014–18. The aim of the project is to examine early modern collecting of Sámi material culture and early descriptions of Sámi culture, primarily in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We aim to study early modern networks of scholars and collectors interested in Sámi material culture, to investigate how and why the collecting was conducted, and to follow the movement of Sámi objects between collections and collectors around Europe. Furthermore, the project aims to discuss the importance of early modern collecting and the collected objects in today’s society. Here, critical issues are raised concerning colonial histories and relations in Sápmi, motivations and ideologies of collecting over time, as well as the

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2015
Keywords
Sámi, Sápmi, colonialism, collecting, globalization, identity, cultural heritage, early modern period, cultural rights, repatriation
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274747 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1917
Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Nordin, J. M. (2015). Hunters in Transition: An Outline of Early Sami History [Review]. Medieval Archaeology, 59(1), 398-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hunters in Transition: An Outline of Early Sami History
2015 (English)In: Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0076-6097, E-ISSN 1745-817X, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 398-399Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282184 (URN)000368712300108 ()
Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Monié Nordin, J. (2015). Metals of Metabolism: The Construction of Industrial Space and the Commodification of Early Modern Sápmi. In: Mark P. Leone & Jocelyn Knauf. (Ed.), Historical Archaeologies of Capitalism: (pp. 249-272). New York: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metals of Metabolism: The Construction of Industrial Space and the Commodification of Early Modern Sápmi
2015 (English)In: Historical Archaeologies of Capitalism / [ed] Mark P. Leone & Jocelyn Knauf., New York: Springer, 2015, p. 249-272Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In 1634, silver was found in inland Sápmi, on the present border between Norway and Sweden. The Swedish Crown had the ore extracted and a works for refining the silver was established in Silbojokk the following year. During the coming decades, two more works and many mines were opened in Sápmi. Sámi, Swedish and Dutch/German migrant workers were employed under restrictive conditions and in a harsh climate. A colonial discourse was developed, viewing Sápmi as the Americas of the Swedes and the Sámi as distinctly non-Swedish/non-European. Expectations of rapid economic and political gain created a metabolic relation to natural resources. The precious metals were exploited at whatever cost. This process caused a change in the perception of man, landscape and nature. Soon, the metal ores were exhausted and all the woods cut down. The three works studied here were all abandoned during the seventeenth century. The metabolic relation to the landscape and the process of commodifying nature prevailed and laid the foundation for later industrial expansion during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2015
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264985 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-12760-6_11 (DOI)000373345200012 ()978-3-319-12760-6 (ISBN)978-3-319-12759-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-10-20 Created: 2015-10-20 Last updated: 2016-08-11Bibliographically approved
Ojala, C.-G. & Nordin, J. M. (2015). Mining Sápmi: Colonial Histories, Sámi Archaeology, and the Exploitation of Natural Resources in Northern Sweden. Arctic Anthropology, 52(2), 6-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mining Sápmi: Colonial Histories, Sámi Archaeology, and the Exploitation of Natural Resources in Northern Sweden
2015 (English)In: Arctic Anthropology, ISSN 0066-6939, E-ISSN 1933-8139, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 6-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, there has been a large-scale boom in mining in the present-day Swedish part of Sápmi, leading to protests from Sámi activists as well as environmentalist groups. To the protesters, issues of Swedish colonialism and Sámi indigeneity are central, and history becomes important. Taking its starting point in the mining conflicts, this article discusses Sámi archaeology and claims for Sámi indigenous land and cultural rights. We argue that it is important to further explore the colonial history in Sápmi, and its meaning and consequences today. Archaeology can contribute with new perspectives on colonial histories and relations, and connections between past and present in Sápmi. At the same time, many issues concerning the ethics and politics of archaeology need to be discussed. Furthermore, in discussions on Sámi archaeology and heritage management in Sápmi, it is important to consider experiences from the international fields of postcolonial studies and indigenous archaeology.

National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282138 (URN)10.3368/aa.52.2.6 (DOI)000372202400002 ()
Funder
Magnus Bergvall FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-04-03 Created: 2016-04-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ojala, C.-G. & Nordin, J. M. (2015). Sápmis koloniala historia. Uppsala Nya Tidning (4 sept)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sápmis koloniala historia
2015 (Swedish)In: Uppsala Nya Tidning, no 4 septArticle in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-271385 (URN)
Projects
En kolonial arena: landskap, människor och globalisering i norra Sveriges inland under tidigmodern tid
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-07 Last updated: 2018-09-18
Herva, V.-P. & Nordin, J. M. (2015). Unearthing Atlantis and performing the past: Ancient things, alternative histories and the present past in the Baroque world. Journal of social archaeology, 15(1), 116-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unearthing Atlantis and performing the past: Ancient things, alternative histories and the present past in the Baroque world
2015 (English)In: Journal of social archaeology, ISSN 1469-6053, E-ISSN 1741-2951, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 116-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses fabrications and alternative histories, and their relationship with antiquarian and early archaeological practice, in the Baroque world through the case of an alabaster urn reportedly found in the garden of a Swedish royal castle in 1685. The urn, decorated with a strange inscription, is used to address broader issues of how the past was conceived in the Baroque world, and how the relationship between the past and present was manipulated through antiquarian research. Certain characteristics of the urn and its cultural life have led modern scholarship to dismiss the artefact as unauthentic' and hence uninteresting, whereas this article seeks to reconsider the nature and meanings of fabricating the past in the 17th century. It will be argued that the past was not fixed in the Baroque world, but various material and magical practices enabled altering the past. It is against that background, and within the Baroque relational understanding of reality, that the 17th-century interest in and manipulations of the urn must be understood.

Keywords
Antiquarianism, history of archaeology, esotericism, 17th-century Sweden, material culture, relational thinking, performance, magic
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247404 (URN)10.1177/1469605314550743 (DOI)000349469300006 ()
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Projects
A Colonial Arena: Landscape, People and Globalization in Inland Northern Sweden in the Early Modern Period [2013-01475_VR]; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology; Publications
Nordin, J. M. & Ojala, C.-G. (2017). Copper Worlds: A historical archaeology of Abraham and Jakob Momma-Reenstierna and their industrial enterprise in the Torne River Valley, c. 1650-1680. Acta Borealia, 34(2), 103-133Ojala, C.-G. & Monié Nordin, J. (2017). Sámi archaeology in a global perspective:: heritage, indigeneity and politics. Fennoscandia Archaeologica, 34, 122-126Ojala, C.-G. & Nordin, J. M. (2015). Sápmis koloniala historia. Uppsala Nya Tidning (4 sept)
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