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Drevin, Jennifer
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Drevin, J., Hallqvist, J., Sonnander, K., Rosenblad, A., Pingel, R. & Bjelland, E. K. (2020). Childhood abuse and unplanned pregnancies: a cross-sectional study of women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 127(4), 438-446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood abuse and unplanned pregnancies: a cross-sectional study of women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study
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2020 (English)In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 438-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To study if childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse are determinants for having an unplanned pregnancy, if the categories of abuse interact, and if a potential bias due to the selection of the participants (collider stratification bias) could explain the effect of childhood abuse.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional study.

SETTING: The study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and uses data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.

SAMPLE: Women participating in the MoBa for the first time, ≥18 years of age who responded to questions regarding childhood abuse and pregnancy planning (n = 76 197).

METHODS: Data were collected using questionnaires. We conducted analyses using modified Poisson regressions and the relative excess risks due to interaction (RERI). Sensitivity analyses were performed.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: An unplanned pregnancy (yes/no).

RESULTS: Exposure to childhood emotional (adjusted relative risk (RR) 1.14, 95% CI 1.10-1.19), physical (adjusted RR 1.11, 95% CI 1.04-1.18) and sexual (adjusted RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.14-1.27) abuse increased the risk of having an unplanned pregnancy. The effects could not be explained by the collider stratification bias. The different combinations of categories of abuse did not show any interaction effects.

CONCLUSIONS: Childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuses separately increase the risk of having an unplanned pregnancy. The results indicate that victims of childhood abuse are in greater need of support to achieve their reproductive goals.

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Childhood abuse increases the risk of having an unplanned pregnancy. #reproductivehealth #epitwitter.

Keywords
MoBa, The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, abortion, child abuse, family planning services, induced, preconception care, pregnancy, unplanned
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402741 (URN)10.1111/1471-0528.16037 (DOI)000504970000001 ()31802594 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-18 Created: 2020-01-18 Last updated: 2020-05-18Bibliographically approved
Drevin, J. (2019). Measuring Pregnancy Planning and the Effect of Childhood Abuse on Reproductive Health. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring Pregnancy Planning and the Effect of Childhood Abuse on Reproductive Health
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy (LMUP) and the Swedish Pregnancy Planning Scale (SPPS) are two measurements of pregnancy planning. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and childhood abuse are stressful events that have been suggested to have both short- and long-term effects.

Study I investigated the psychometric properties of the LMUP and the SPPS and compared their assessments. Questionnaire data from 2,314 pregnant women showed medium-high construct validity and high test-retest reliability for both measurements. The convergent validity of LMUP was low. The assessments of the LMUP and the SPPS corresponded substantially.

Study II explored how the SPPS was interpreted and what women considered when responding to it. Twenty-five pregnant women were interviewed. Women responding to the SPPS took into account their life situation, intentions, desires, timing, actions to prepare for, or avoid, pregnancy, having discussed becoming pregnant with their partner, and reactions after learning of the pregnancy.

Study III analysed the association between ACEs and pregnancy-related pain. Pregnant women (n = 142) responded to questionnaires in early and late pregnancy, respectively, and reported their pain intensities and pain distributions. Greater exposure to ACEs was associated with higher pain distribution and women exposed to ACEs reported higher worst pain intensities compared to non-exposed.

Study IV investigated effects of childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse on pregnancy planning. The effect of a potential collider-stratification bias were also studied. Questionnaire data from 76,197 pregnant Norwegian women showed separate but no joint effects of the categories on having an unplanned pregnancy and a collider-stratification bias could not explain the effects.

The LMUP and the SPPS measure somewhat different aspects of pregnancy planning and there is a substantial agreement between their assessments. Both the LMUP and the SPPS showed good validity and test-retest reliability. However, the LMUP would likely benefit from item reduction and the SPPS poorly captures any health-related changes made in and the preconception period.

The results suggest that childhood abuse and ACEs have an effect on pregnancy planning and pregnancy-related pain. The findings suggest that preventing child abuse could have a positive effect on later reproductive health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2019. p. 71
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1555
Keywords
pregnancy planning, unplanned pregnancy, childhood abuse, adverse childhood experiences, reproductive health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379739 (URN)978-91-513-0603-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-05-10, Sal IX, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, Uppsala, 01:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2020-05-18
Bodin, M., Käll, L., Tydén, T., Stern, J., Drevin, J. & Larsson, M. (2017). Exploring men's pregnancy-planning behaviour and fertility knowledge: a survey among fathers in Sweden. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 122(2), 127-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring men's pregnancy-planning behaviour and fertility knowledge: a survey among fathers in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 122, no 2, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Research about pregnancy-planning behaviour mostly focuses on women, even though pregnancy planning usually also concerns men. The purpose of this study was to investigate how men plan for family, and to measure their fertility knowledge after having become fathers. Material and methods: Data were collected in 2014 as part of a Swedish longitudinal pregnancy-planning study. Men were recruited through their female partner one year after childbirth. Participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire about pregnancy planning, lifestyles, and fertility. Results: Of the 796 participants, 646 (81%) stated that the pregnancy had been very or fairly planned, and 17% (n=128) had made a lifestyle adjustment before pregnancy to improve health and fertility. The most common adjustments were to reduce/quit the consumption of alcohol, cigarettes, or snuff, and to exercise more. First-time fathers and those who had used assisted reproductive technology to become pregnant were more likely to have made an adjustment. Fertility knowledge varied greatly. Men with university education had better fertility knowledge than men without university education. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that there is variation in how men plan and prepare for pregnancy. Most men did not adjust their lifestyle to improve health and fertility, while some made several changes. Both pregnancy-planning behaviour and fertility knowledge seem to be related to level of education and mode of conception. To gain deeper understanding of behaviour and underlying factors, more research is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Fathers, fertility knowledge, gender equality, lifestyle, preconception health, pregnancy planning
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323499 (URN)10.1080/03009734.2017.1316531 (DOI)000401756500009 ()28471260 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-21 Created: 2017-06-21 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
Drevin, J., Kristiansson, P., Stern, J. & Rosenblad, A. (2017). Measuring pregnancy planning: A psychometric evaluation and comparison of two scales. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73(11), 2765-2775
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring pregnancy planning: A psychometric evaluation and comparison of two scales
2017 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 11, p. 2765-2775Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To psychometrically test the London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy and compare it with the Swedish Pregnancy Planning Scale. Background: The incidence of unplanned pregnancies is an important indicator of reproductive health. The London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy measures pregnancy planning by taking contraceptive use, timing, intention to become pregnant, desire for pregnancy, partner agreement, and pre-conceptual preparations into account. It has, however, previously not been psychometrically evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. The Likert-scored single-item Swedish Pregnancy Planning Scale has been developed to measure the woman's own view of pregnancy planning level. Design: Cross-sectional design. Methods: In 2012-2013, 5493 pregnant women living in Sweden were invited to participate in the Swedish Pregnancy Planning study, of whom 3327 (61%) agreed to participate and answered a questionnaire. A test-retest pilot study was conducted in 2011-2012. Thirty-two participants responded to the questionnaire on two occasions 14 days apart. Data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis, Cohen's weighted kappa and Spearman's correlation. Results: All items of the London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy contributed to measuring pregnancy planning, but four items had low item-reliability. The London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy and Swedish Pregnancy Planning Scale corresponded reasonably well with each other and both showed good test-retest reliability. Conclusion: The London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy may benefit from item reduction and its usefulness may be questioned. The Swedish Pregnancy Planning Scale is time-efficient and shows acceptable reliability and construct validity, which makes it more useful for measuring pregnancy planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
antenatal care, confirmatory factor analysis, instrument development, midwives, nursing, pregnancy planning, psychometrics, reproducibility of results, reproductive health, unplanned pregnancy
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339704 (URN)10.1111/jan.13364 (DOI)000418363000027 ()28620936 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-26 Created: 2018-01-26 Last updated: 2019-03-21Bibliographically approved
Drevin, J., Stern, J., Annerbäck, E.-M., Peterson, M., Butler, S., Tydén, T., . . . Kristiansson, P. (2015). Adverse childhood experiences influence development of pain during pregnancy.. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 94(8), 840-846
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adverse childhood experiences influence development of pain during pregnancy.
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2015 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, no 8, p. 840-846Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and pain with onset during pregnancy.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

SETTING: Eighteen antenatal clinics in southern Mid-Sweden.

SAMPLE: Of 293 women invited to participate, 232 (79%) women agreed to participate in early pregnancy and were assessed in late pregnancy.

METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed in early and late pregnancy. The questionnaires sought information on socio-demography, ACE, pain location by pain drawing and pain intensity by visual analogue scales. Distribution of pain was coded in 41 predetermined areas.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain in third trimester with onset during present pregnancy: intensity, location and number of pain locations.

RESULTS: In late pregnancy, 62% of the women reported any ACE and 72% reported any pain location with onset during the present pregnancy. Among women reporting any ACE the median pain intensity was higher compared with women without such an experience (p = 0.01). The accumulated ACE displayed a positive association with the number of reported pain locations in late pregnancy (rs  = 0.19, p = 0.02). This association remained significant after adjusting for background factors in multiple regression analysis (p = 0.01). When ACE was dichotomized the prevalence of pain did not differ between women with and without ACE. The subgroup of women reporting physical abuse as a child reported a higher prevalence of sacral and pelvic pain (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.02, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Adverse childhood experiences were associated with higher pain intensities and larger pain distributions in late pregnancy, which are risk factors for transition to chronic pain postpartum.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-256150 (URN)10.1111/aogs.12674 (DOI)000357983900005 ()25965273 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2019-03-21Bibliographically approved
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