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Nilsson, Maria Markhed
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Baghdassarian, E., Nilsson, M. M., Lindström, E., Nilsson, B. M. & Lewander, T. (2018). Auditory brainstem response (ABR) profiling tests as diagnostic support for schizophrenia and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 30(3), 137-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auditory brainstem response (ABR) profiling tests as diagnostic support for schizophrenia and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
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2018 (English)In: Acta Neuropsychiatrica, ISSN 0924-2708, E-ISSN 1601-5215, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate the performances of two auditory brainstem response (ABR) profiling tests as potential biomarkers and diagnostic support for schizophrenia and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), respectively, in an investigator-initiated blinded study design.

Method: Male and female patients with schizophrenia (n=26) and adult ADHD (n=24) meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM IV) diagnostic criteria and healthy controls (n=58) comprised the analysis set (n=108) of the total number of study participants (n=119). Coded sets of randomized ABR recordings were analysed by an independent party blinded to clinical diagnoses before a joint code-breaking session.

Results: The ABR profiling test for schizophrenia identified schizophrenia patients versus controls with a sensitivity of 84.6% and a specificity of 93.1%. The ADHD test identified patients with adult ADHD versus controls with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 91.4%.

Conclusion: The ABR profiling tests discriminated schizophrenia and ADHD versus healthy controls with high sensitivity and specificity. The methods deserve to be further explored in larger clinical studies including a broad range of psychiatric disorders to determine their utility as potential diagnostic biomarkers.

Keywords
ADHD, ERP, schizophrenia, psychiatric disorders
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361555 (URN)10.1017/neu.2017.24 (DOI)000438808000003 ()28803577 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Asherson, P., Stes, S., Nilsson, M. M., Berggren, L., Svanborg, P., Kutzelnigg, A. & Deberdt, W. (2015). The effects of atomoxetine on emotional control in adults with ADHD: An integrated analysis of multicenter studies. European psychiatry, 30(4), 511-520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of atomoxetine on emotional control in adults with ADHD: An integrated analysis of multicenter studies
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2015 (English)In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 511-520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigate the effects of atomoxetine on emotional control in adults with ADHD. Methods: We performed an integrated analysis using individual patient data pooled from three Eli Lilly-sponsored studies. An integrated analysis can be viewed as a meta-analysis of individual patient-level data, rather than study-level summary data. Results: Two populations were identified: a large sample of patients with pre-treatment baseline data (the "overall population''; n = 2846); and a subset of these patients with placebo-controlled efficacy data from baseline to 10 or 12 weeks after initiating treatment (the "placebo-controlled population''; n = 829). At baseline, in the overall population, similar to 50% of ADHD patients had BRIEF-AS (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version Self-Report) Emotional control subscores between 21 and 30, compared with similar to 10% of normative subjects in the BRIEF-A manual. At endpoint, in the placebo-controlled population, atomoxetine led to a small (effect size 0.19) but significant (P = 0.013) treatment effect for emotional control. The effect size was 0.32 in patients with BRIEF-AS Emotional control scores > 20 at baseline. Improvements in emotional control correlated with improvements in the core ADHD symptoms and quality-of-life. Discussion: As deficient emotional control is associated with impaired social, educational and occupational functioning over and above that explained by core ADHD symptoms alone, improvements in emotional control may be clinically relevant. Conclusion: At baseline, adults with ADHD were more likely to have impaired emotional control than normative subjects. In the adult ADHD patients, atomoxetine treatment was associated with improvements in emotional control, as well as in core ADHD symptoms and quality-of-life.

Keywords
Atomoxetine, ADHD, Emotional control, Integrated analysis
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-257009 (URN)10.1016/j.eurpsy.2014.12.002 (DOI)000355675400012 ()25649490 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-29 Created: 2015-06-29 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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