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Carpentier, NicoORCID iD iconorcid.org/ncarpent
Publications (10 of 430) Show all publications
Carpentier, N. (2019). About Dislocations and Invitations: Deepening the Conceptualization of the Discursive-Material Knot. In: Tomas Marttila (Ed.), Discourse, Culture and Organization: Inquiries into Relational Structures of Power (pp. 407). New York: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>About Dislocations and Invitations: Deepening the Conceptualization of the Discursive-Material Knot
2019 (English)In: Discourse, Culture and Organization: Inquiries into Relational Structures of Power / [ed] Tomas Marttila, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 407-Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter engages in a discussion about the knotted relations between the discursive and the material, starting from the discourse-theoretical position developed by Laclau and Mouffe, which emphasizes the importance of the discursive as producing necessary but contingent frameworks of intelligentibility. Even if Laclau and Mouffe’s discourse theory acknowledges the importance of the material, this chapter also argues for a clearer development of the material’s capacity to intervene in the discursive. Two concepts are proposed to think this through further, namely, the dislocation and the invitation, where the former captures a more disruptive mechanism and the latter a more constructive mechanism. In the last part of the chapter, the workings of both concepts are illustrated in a case study on a Cypriot community media organization, called the Cyprus Community Media Centre (CCMC). This case study shows how the counter-hegemonic project of the CCMC, with its materials, manages to disrupt the antagonistic-nationalist discourses that circulate on this island and is simultaneously disrupted because the discursive and material components of the CCMC assemblage do not let themselves be harnessed and encapsulated that easily either.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Series
Postdisciplinary Studies in Discourse
Keywords
discourse theory, new materialism
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367362 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94123-3 (DOI)9783319941226 (ISBN)9783319941233 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Carpentier, N. (2019). An Introduction to Respublika! Experiments in the Performance of Participation and Democracy. In: Nico Carpentier (Ed.), Respublika!: Experiments in the Performance of Participation and Democracy (pp. 3-8). Limassol: NeMe
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Introduction to Respublika! Experiments in the Performance of Participation and Democracy
2019 (English)In: Respublika!: Experiments in the Performance of Participation and Democracy / [ed] Nico Carpentier, Limassol: NeMe , 2019, p. 3-8Chapter in book (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Limassol: NeMe, 2019
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371658 (URN)978-9963-9695-8-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-22 Created: 2018-12-22 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved
Lepik, K. & Carpentier, N. (2019). Articulating the visitor in public knowledge institutions. In: Leen Van Brussel, Benjamin De Cleen, Nico Carpentier (Ed.), Communication and Discourse Theory: Collected works of the Brussels Discourse Theory Group (pp. 203-224). Bristol: Intellect Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Articulating the visitor in public knowledge institutions
2019 (English)In: Communication and Discourse Theory: Collected works of the Brussels Discourse Theory Group / [ed] Leen Van Brussel, Benjamin De Cleen, Nico Carpentier, Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2019, p. 203-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter analyses visitor articulations used by managers and key documents of three Estonian public knowledge institutions. Three visitor articulations were identified in the analysed material, namely visitors as the people, as target groups, and as stakeholders, each related in this chapter to a specific body of literature. These articulations are co-existent semantic tools, used by public knowledge institutions to make sense of the complex relationships with people that cross the boundaries protecting the institutions from the outside world(s). They show how Estonian museum and library culture has sought to balance the more traditional educational paradigm with marketing-driven and democratic paradigms. Despite these changes, the chapter also argues that all three articulations have a significant role to play in organising the institutional governance of the visitors, enabling visitors to, and disabling them from, performing specific practices. Although the third visitor articulation (the visitor as stakeholder) holds the promise of a more democratised relationship between visitors and institutions, even in this case, we can still see the logics of governmentality at work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2019
Keywords
public knowledge institutions, libraries, museums, library and museum culture, stakeholders
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388255 (URN)9781789380545 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
Van Brussel, L., De Cleen, B. & Carpentier, N. (Eds.). (2019). Communication and Discourse Theory: Collected works of the Brussels Discourse Theory Group. Bristol: Intellect Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication and Discourse Theory: Collected works of the Brussels Discourse Theory Group
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This volume gathers the work of the Brussels Discourse Theory Group, a group of critical media and communication scholars that deploy discourse theory as a theoretical backbone and an analytical research perspective. The book seeks to show the value and applicability of discourse-theoretical analysis (DTA) within the field of media and communication studies, through a variety of case studies that highlight both the radical contingent nature and the hegemonic workings of media and communication practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2019
Keywords
discourse theory, poststructuralism, communication
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388219 (URN)9781789380545 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-06-27
Murru, M. F., Colombo, F., Peja, L., Tosoni, S., Kilborn, R., Kunelius, R., . . . Carpentier, N. (Eds.). (2019). Communication as the intersection of the old and the new. Bremen: edition lumière
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication as the intersection of the old and the new
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2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book, the fourteenth in the Researching and Teaching Communication Book Series launched in 2006, stems from the communal intellectual work of the lecturers, the students and the alumni of the 2018 edition of the European Media and Communication Doctoral Summer School (SuSo).The book gives an account of the plurality of research interests and analytical perspectives that the SuSo community values as its main asset. What was especially apparent in this year’s cluster of contributions is that our field of study integrates a wide variety of media technologies (ranging from old to new), demonstrating that contemporary societies are not characterized by the replacement of technologies, but by the always unique articulations, integrations and intersections of old and new. The book is structured in four sections: 1) Theories and Concepts, 2) Media and the Construction of Social Reality, 3) Mediatizations, 4) Media, Health and Sociability. Contributors are: Fatoş Adiloğlu, Magnus Andersson, Nico Carpentier, Xu Chen, Vaia Doudaki, Edgard Eeckman, Timo Harjuniemi, Kari Karppinen, Alyona Khaptsova, Ludmila Lupinacci, Fatma Nazlı Köksal, Ondrej Pekacek , Michael Skey, Piia Tammpuu, Ruben Vandenplas, Konstanze Wegmann and  Karsten D. Wolf  . The book additionally contains abstracts of the doctoral projects that were discussed at the 2018 European Media Communication Doctoral Summer School.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bremen: edition lumière, 2019. p. 223
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396012 (URN)978-3-948077-03-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-10-28 Created: 2019-10-28 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Carpentier, N. (2019). Community Media as Rhizome. In: Nico Carpentier (Ed.), Respublika!: Experiments in the Performance of Participation and Democracy (pp. 19-28). Limassol: NeMe
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community Media as Rhizome
2019 (English)In: Respublika!: Experiments in the Performance of Participation and Democracy / [ed] Nico Carpentier, Limassol: NeMe , 2019, p. 19-28Chapter in book (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Limassol: NeMe, 2019
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371660 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-22 Created: 2018-12-22 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved
Nossek, H. & Carpentier, N. (2019). Community media, their communities and conflict: A mapping analysis of Israeli community broadcasting groups. Journal of Alternative and Community Media, 4(2), 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community media, their communities and conflict: A mapping analysis of Israeli community broadcasting groups
2019 (English)In: Journal of Alternative and Community Media, ISSN 2206-5857, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Community media organisations are famously difficult to define, as this media field is highly elusive and diverse, even if there is a certain degree of consensus about a series of basic characteristics. One key defining component is the objective to serve its community by allowing its members to participate in self-representational processes. Yet this component raises questions about what ‘community’ means, and how the community that is being served relates to other parts of society. This article studies a particular social reality – Israel – where community television is the dominant model, community television production groups are separated from the actual distribution of the produced content and different configurations of ‘us’ and ‘them’ characterise political reality. Following the methodological procedures outlined in Voniati et al. (2018), a mapping of 83 Israeli community broadcasting groups was organised, allowing us to flesh out the different ways in which these community broadcasting groups deal with their community/ies and the ‘other’. The analysis shows that many of these Israeli community broadcasting groups have fairly closed, singular-community articulations of ‘their’ communities. They rarely engage in interactions with other communities (limiting internal diversity) and their external diversity is even more restricted, with only one Arab–Israeli community broadcasting group able to be identified. The analysis did, however, identify a dozen groups with more open approaches towards their outer worlds, and thus the potential to assume a more conflict-transformatory role.

Keywords
Agonism, collaboration, community television, Israel, mapping analysis, multi-voice, peace-building
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388262 (URN)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
De Cleen, B. & Carpentier, N. (2019). Contesting the populist claim on ‘the people’ through popular culture: The 0110 concerts versus the Vlaams Belang. In: Leen Van Brussel, Benjamin De Cleen, Nico Carpentier (Ed.), Communication and Discourse Theory: Collected works of the Brussels Discourse Theory Group (pp. 283-306). Bristol: Intellect Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contesting the populist claim on ‘the people’ through popular culture: The 0110 concerts versus the Vlaams Belang
2019 (English)In: Communication and Discourse Theory: Collected works of the Brussels Discourse Theory Group / [ed] Leen Van Brussel, Benjamin De Cleen, Nico Carpentier, Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2019, p. 283-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although they belong to different spheres, popular culture and populism can in some cases become intertwined and interlocked because they are both built around the antagonism between people and elite. Populist parties are often happy to associate themselves with popular culture as this allows them to strengthen their bond with the (signifier) people. This chapter looks at an inverse movement: the contestation of a populist party's claim on the people through popular culture. It analyzes the discursive struggle between the Flemish extreme-right populist party Vlaams Belang and 0110. On 1 October 2006, a series of concerts “for tolerance, against racism, against extremism, and against gratuitous violence” featuring many of Belgium's most popular artists from all kinds of genres, were held in four Belgian cities. The chapter shows how the organization behind the 0110 concerts managed to turn popular culture against the Vlaams Belang, thus questioning this party's claim on the signifier “people”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Intellect Ltd., 2019
Keywords
populism, popular culture, extreme right, Vlaams Belang, discourse-theoretical analysis
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388257 (URN)9781789380545 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Doudaki, V. & Carpentier, N. (2019). Critiquing hegemony and fostering alternative ways of thinking about homelessness: The articulation of the homeless subject position in the Greek street paper shedia. Communications. Media. Design., 4(1), 5-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critiquing hegemony and fostering alternative ways of thinking about homelessness: The articulation of the homeless subject position in the Greek street paper shedia
2019 (English)In: Communications. Media. Design., ISSN 2542-1395, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 5-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article deploys discourse theory to study the construction of the homeless subject position in the Greek street paper shedia. After a brief outline of the relevant parts of Laclau and Mouffe's (1985) discourse theory, the article first reports on the theoretical work that outlines the elements that construct the homeless subject position, keeping in mind the existence of a hegemonic version of this homeless subject position, which is driven by stigma and othering. While mainstream media often replicate this problematic representation, street papers offer counter-hegemonic (and more respectful) articulations of the homeless subject position. Through the analysis of shedia’s coverage, three nodal points of the hegemonic discourse on the homeless were identified: the absence of the home as stigma, the lack of agency and the political identity of the denizen. The counter-hegemonic discourse, that can also be found in shedia, comprises three nodal points that are the inverse of those of the hegemonic discourse: the alternative home, the attribution of agency and the political identity of the citizen. Arguably, this case study is relevant because it shows the mirror-image-logics of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic representations, and the significance of using high theory to further our understanding of social practices.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396014 (URN)
Available from: 2019-10-28 Created: 2019-10-28 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Carpentier, N. (2019). Enriching Discourse Theory: The Discursive-Material Knot as a Non-Hierarchical Ontology. Global Discourse, 9(2), 369-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enriching Discourse Theory: The Discursive-Material Knot as a Non-Hierarchical Ontology
2019 (English)In: Global Discourse, ISSN 2043-7897, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this reply, we question whether 'the knot' is the best way to describe the relationship between the discursive and the material. Our main objective is to show that the discursive and material are co-extensive and therefore emerge from within the same assemblage, prior to any 'knot' between them. To develop this idea, we draw on the new materialism of Karen Barad and Jane Bennett, especially their argument for how and why it makes sense to approach the discursive and the material as hyphenated ('discursive-material') as well as performatively constituted.

National Category
Communication Studies Media Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388259 (URN)10.1332/204378919X15526540593642 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/ncarpent

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