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Blicharska, Malgorzata
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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Eriksson, B., Johansson, F. & Blicharska, M. (2019). Socio-economic impacts of marine conservation efforts in three Indonesian fishing communities. Marine Policy, 103, 59-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socio-economic impacts of marine conservation efforts in three Indonesian fishing communities
2019 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 103, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Numerous conservation initiatives have been undertaken to protect large marine animals by legal protection and implementing marine protected areas (MPAs). Despite these efforts, many marine animals are still threatened, partly due to lack of compliance with conservation regulations. Meanwhile, research suggests that conservation efforts which also take socio-economic factors such as fishermen's livelihoods into account during planning and implementation are more likely to succeed. This study examined the compliance and socio-economic situation of local fishing communities at three sites in Indonesia (Nusa Penida, Tanjung Luar and Komodo National Park) where shark and manta ray conservation efforts have been implemented. 59 local residents were interviewed. The results showed that 49% of those residents had experienced a deterioration and 37% an improvement in their economic situation since conservation efforts in the form of species protection or MPAs were implemented in their area. The economic situation of the residents was associated with their access to alternative livelihoods, access to information on conservation rules, and relationship with conservation authorities. Particularly, interviewees with easier access to alternative income and a positive relationship with conservation authorities also experienced an increase in their economy. In addition, compliance with conservation efforts was positively related to improved economic situation, access to alternative livelihoods and information on conservation rules. These factors all differed among the three study sites, leading to different compliance levels between sites. The results of this study indicate the importance of considering socio-economic factors and of involving local communities when planning and implementing conservation efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382377 (URN)10.1016/j.marpol.2019.02.007 (DOI)000463125700008 ()
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2019-04-25 Created: 2019-04-25 Last updated: 2019-04-25Bibliographically approved
Blicharska, M. & Hilding-Rydevik, T. (2018). “A Thousand flowers are flowering just now” – towards integration of ecosystem services concept into decision making. Ecosystem Services, 30, 181-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“A Thousand flowers are flowering just now” – towards integration of ecosystem services concept into decision making
2018 (English)In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 30, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigate the integration of the ecosystem services (ES) concept in decision making.

We use the three dimensions of learning to investigate the use of the ES concept.

ES concept seems to meet several positive expectations put forward in science and policy.

A main contribution from the concept may potentially be its function as a “boundary object”.

Implementing ES into practice is a complex process and a multifaceted task.

National Category
Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346494 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoser.2018.03.001 (DOI)000428532600019 ()
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Tinch, R., Bugter, R., Blicharska, M., Harrison, P., Haslett, J., Jokinen, P., . . . Primmer, E. (2018). Arguments for biodiversity conservation: factors influencing their observed effectiveness in European case studies. Biodiversity and Conservation, 27(7), 1763-1788
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arguments for biodiversity conservation: factors influencing their observed effectiveness in European case studies
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2018 (English)In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1763-1788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Making a strong case for biodiversity protection is central to meeting the biodiversity targets in international agreements such as the CBD and achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Effective arguments are needed to convince diverse actors that protection is worthwhile, and can play a crucial role in closing the implementation gap between biodiversity policy targets and outcomes. Drawing on a database of arguments from 11 European case studies, along with additional interview and case study material from all 13 case studies of the BESAFE project, we analysed relationships between potential and observed effectiveness of arguments. Our results show that strong logic, robustness, and timing of arguments are necessary but not sufficient conditions for arguments to be effective. We find that use of multiple and diverse arguments can enhance effectiveness by broadening the appeal to wider audiences, especially when arguments are repeated and refined through constructive dialogue. We discuss the role of framing, bundling and tailoring arguments to audiences in increasing effectiveness. Our results provide further support for the current shift towards recognition of value pluralism in biodiversity science and decision-making. We hope our results will help to demonstrate more convincingly the value of biodiversity to stakeholders in decision processes and thus build better cases for its conservation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Biodiversity policy, Arguments for biodiversity conservation, Argument framing, Ecosystem services, Science policy interfaces
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356617 (URN)10.1007/s10531-018-1549-3 (DOI)000432789700012 ()
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, EC-282743
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Blicharska, M. & Smithers, R. J. (2018). Bialowieza Forest: Political stands [Letter to the editor]. Science, 359(6376), 646-646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bialowieza Forest: Political stands
2018 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 359, no 6376, p. 646-646Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE, 2018
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348316 (URN)10.1126/science.aar7173 (DOI)000425117700029 ()29439234 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Smithers, R. J., Doick, K. J., Burton, A., Sibille, R., Steinbach, D., Harris, R., . . . Blicharska, M. (2018). Comparing the relative abilities of tree species to cool the urban environment. Urban Ecosystems, 21(5), 851-862
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing the relative abilities of tree species to cool the urban environment
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2018 (English)In: Urban Ecosystems, ISSN 1083-8155, E-ISSN 1573-1642, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 851-862Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing urbanisation poses numerous challenges to human quality of life. Cities are particularly vulnerable to the urban heat-island effect, which will be amplified by climate change. Increasing tree cover may be one of the most cost-effective ways of moderating urban temperatures. Trees cool their surroundings by casting shade, reflecting solar radiation, transpiring, and intercepting rainfall that subsequently evaporates. However, the potential of trees to reduce the urban heat-island effect is underutilised. The aim of this study was to synthesise understanding of the relative abilities of different tree species to provide urban cooling in temperate regions of the world and thereby develop a pragmatic approach for choosing those trees that have greatest potential in that regard. Based on a literature review and semi-structured interviews with leading experts, we developed a series of scenarios to illustrate the impacts of a tree's cooling mechanisms and tree species' attributes on components of the surface-energy balance equation. This enabled us to select parameters and propose simple equations that can be used to compare the relative abilities of tree species in relation to each of the cooling mechanisms. The parameters selected were for: transpiration - crown diameter, Leaf Area Index (LAI), canopy aspect ratio, and stomatal conductance or growth rate; reflection - albedo, crown diameter and LAI; shading - canopy aspect ratio, crown diameter, LAI and tree height. The approach is intended for use by urban planners and managers who wish to make informed decisions about which tree species to select for planting to counter the urban heat-island effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Albedo, Heat-island effect, Shading, Surface-energy balance, Transpiration, Urban trees
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363213 (URN)10.1007/s11252-018-0761-y (DOI)000445501200004 ()
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Iwinska, K., Blicharska, M., Pierotti, L., Tainio, M. & de Nazelle, A. (2018). Cycling in Warsaw, Poland - Perceived enablers and barriers according to cyclists and non-cyclists. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 113, 291-301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cycling in Warsaw, Poland - Perceived enablers and barriers according to cyclists and non-cyclists
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2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 113, p. 291-301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cycling in urban environments provides many benefits to people. However, planning of cycling infrastructures in large cities faces numerous challenges and requires better understanding of both the factors enabling cycling as well as barriers to it, determined by particular local context. While there is a growing body of research that tackle the bike transport related questions in Western Europe and the USA, there is relatively little research on that in Central Eastern Europe (CEE), in post-communist countries. In this study we used qualitative and quantitative methods to explore urban cyclists and non-cyclists opinions about the cycling, the perceived problems and obstacles, and perception of the on-going changes in bicycle transportation system in Warsaw, Poland. Although many people see potential advantages of cycling, it is mostly perceived as a leisure time activity. Those who do utilitarian cycling are more acutely aware of the benefits, such as rapidity and flexibility of this mean of transport. The main perceived barriers are linked to lack of good cycling infrastructure in the city, the feeling of insecurity linked to the behaviour of drivers, and to maintenance during winter. In conclusion, our research highlights both the opportunities and challenges linked to the development of improved cycle transportation system, suggesting the need for a range of policies, from the infrastructure improvements and comprehensive planning of the whole transportation system, to improving the driving culture that would support feeling of security of the cyclists.

Keywords
Active transport, Barriers to cycling, Urban cycling, Cyclist perception, Infrastructural changes in the city
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361539 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2018.04.014 (DOI)000438180900020 ()30008521 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Blicharska, M. & Rönnbäck, P. (2018). Recreational fishing for sea trout – Resource for whom and to what value?. Fisheries Research, 204, 380-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recreational fishing for sea trout – Resource for whom and to what value?
2018 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 204, p. 380-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recreational fishing is an important activity that delivers substantial social and economic values. Proper management of recreational fisheries relies on information about resource use and associated values by different fishers, but such information is rare, particularly for open access fisheries. In this study a survey of 471 fishers on the Swedish island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, assessed catches, proportion of catch-and-release (C&R), and economic value (expenditures and willingness to pay, WTP) of sea trout fishing in 2015-2016. Data was analysed in relation to gear used (fly and spin angling, nets and mixed fishery) and fisher connection to fishing site (permanent and temporary residents, Swedish and international tourists). There were marginal differences in daily catch rates, but significant differences in effort and annual catches between different fishers, with resident fishers having the highest catches. Anglers had 86% C&R rates, and fly fishers (> 95%) differed significantly from other anglers. Anglers, particularly fly fishers and fishing tourists, had much higher expenditures per year, fish caught and fish kept compared to net fishers. WTP before refraining from fishing, for doubling of fish supply and for potential fishing license was also highest among anglers. Our findings are discussed in terms of distinguishing characteristics for different types of recreational fishers. Fishing efforts, economic values and the need for further studies are also outlined in the context of fisheries and tourism management.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348021 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2018.03.004 (DOI)000432768000040 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00227
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Blicharska, M. & Rönnbäck, P. (2018). What factors enable or hinder engagement of civil society in ecosystem management?: The case of "pike factories' and wetland restoration in Sweden. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 61(5-6), 950-969
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What factors enable or hinder engagement of civil society in ecosystem management?: The case of "pike factories' and wetland restoration in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 61, no 5-6, p. 950-969Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Engaging civil society in conservation activities is an important complementary strategy to counteract ongoing biodiversity decline and loss of ecosystem services. Since 2011, the Swedish Anglers Association (SAA) has cooperated with landowners to restore wetlands nationwide. We investigated factors that enabled or hindered civil society-led wetland restoration in Sweden through interviews and surveys with the SAA's project leaders and landowners. Principal internal and external factors contributing to the project's implementation included: flexibility and adaptive management of its leadership; support from authorities and policies; the good reputation of the SAA team; and landowners' willingness to cooperate. The latter was linked to their feelings of environmental responsibility, the low investment required by them, and expectations of some benefits. We discuss the need to enable adaptive management in environmental management projects, adjust existing policies to their needs, and re-think funding strategies to consider the long-term nature of such projects.

Keywords
adaptive management, ecosystem services, environmental NGO, landowners, recreational fisheries
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354264 (URN)10.1080/09640568.2017.1350145 (DOI)000430421700011 ()
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Primmer, E., Termansen, M., Bredin, Y., Blicharska, M., Garcia-Llorente, M., Berry, P., . . . Andersen, A. H. .. (2017). Caught between personal and collective values: biodiversity conservation in European decision-making. Environmental Policy and Governance, 27(6), 588-604
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caught between personal and collective values: biodiversity conservation in European decision-making
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 588-604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individual decision-makers at different governance levels operate in social contexts, which means that they sometimes need to compromise their personal values. Yet, this dissonance is rarely the direct target of empirical analyses of environmental decision-making. We undertake a Q-analysis of decision-makers' personal perspectives and the perspectives they perceive to dominate in their decision-making contexts. Our empirical analysis addresses biodiversity conservation, which has traditionally been justified with intrinsic value- and science-based arguments. The arguments have recently been broadened with the concept of ecosystem services, highlighting human benefits and values. This evolving context is interesting because of the new rise of anthropocentric values, which can lead to decision-makers experiencing dissonance. Our analysis of interviews with 43 biodiversity conservation decision-makers from nine European countries reveals four personally held perspectives that highlight different, yet partly overlapping, values – intrinsic, human benefit, conservation and connection – as well as three perspectives perceived to dominate in decision-making – utilitarian, insurance and knowledge values. The comparison of personally held and perceived dominant perspectives points to one major conflict: those decision-makers who personally associate with intrinsic values and perceive utilitarian values to dominate in decision-making experience dissonance. By contrast, personally held human benefit values are accommodated well in decision-making contexts and decision-makers who perceive insurance values to dominate experience the least conflict with personally held values. These findings demonstrate the potential of arguments stressing long-term benefits for easing tension and conflicts in conservation decision-making, and the usefulness of empirically testing of the coincidence of individual and social values. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337137 (URN)10.1002/eet.1763 (DOI)000418257500006 ()
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved
Blicharska, M., Andersson, J., Bergsten, J., Bjelke, U., Hilding-Rydevik, T., Thomsson, M., . . . Johansson, F. (2017). Is there a relationship between socio-economic factors and biodiversity in urban ponds?: A study in the city of Stockholm. Urban Ecosystems, 20(6), 1209-1220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there a relationship between socio-economic factors and biodiversity in urban ponds?: A study in the city of Stockholm
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2017 (English)In: Urban Ecosystems, ISSN 1083-8155, E-ISSN 1573-1642, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 1209-1220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban small water bodies, such as ponds, are essential elements of human socio-economic landscapes. Ponds also provide important habitats for species that would otherwise not survive in the urban environment. Knowledge on the biodiversity of urban ponds and the relationship between their ecological value and factors linked to urbanization and socio-economic status is crucial for decisions on where and how to establish and manage ponds in cities to deliver maximum biodiversity benefits. Our study investigates if the pattern of urban-pond biodiversity can be related to different socio-economic factors, such as level of wealth, education or percentage of buildings of different types. Because of lack of previous studies investigating that, our study is of exploratory character and many different variables are used. We found that the biodiversity of aquatic insects was significantly negatively associated with urbanisation variables such as amount of buildings and number of residents living around ponds. This relationship did not differ depending on the spatial scale of our investigation. In contrast, we did not find a significant relationship with variables representing socio-economic status, such as education level and wealth of people. This latter result suggests that the socio-economic status of residents does not lead to any particular effect in terms of the management and function of ponds that would affect biodiversity. However, there is a need for a finer-scale investigation of the different potential mechanism in which residents in areas with differing socio-economic status could indirectly influence ponds.

Keywords
Biodiversity, Socio-economic factors, Urbanization, Urban ponds, Stockholm
National Category
Ecology Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343908 (URN)10.1007/s11252-017-0673-2 (DOI)000417619400004 ()
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved
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