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Ijla, Akram
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Gustafsson, C. & Ijla, A. (2018). Building conservation as a catalyst for regional sustainable development. Halland model as planning and acting sphere. In: VanBalen, K Vandesande, A (Ed.), Innovative Built Heritage Models: . Paper presented at International Conference on Innovative Built Heritage Models and Preventive Systems (CHANGES), FEB 06-08, 2017, Leuven, BELGIUM (pp. 161-166). CRC PRESS-BALKEMA
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building conservation as a catalyst for regional sustainable development. Halland model as planning and acting sphere
2018 (English)In: Innovative Built Heritage Models / [ed] VanBalen, K Vandesande, A, CRC PRESS-BALKEMA , 2018, p. 161-166Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recently, conservation of built cultural heritage has been understood as a driver for sustainable growth and is no longer just recognized as an obstacle to development. Sustainable integrated conservation is regarded as an important strategic investment for the entirely society and as a catalyst for sustainable development. Halland Model states that utilizing "trading zone" as a democratic pluralistic arena in historic conservation's decision-making process is the catalyst for sustainable regional development. The model developed where the "trading zone" defined as an active melting pot aiming at assisting various actors for making sense together. This paper proposes changes and enhancement for the model in order to achieve an integrated vision of historic preservation within regional development planning process. In this way, collective governance sphere "the enhanced model" is constitute by the stakeholders and the members of an inter-communicating community, situated in the particularities of time, place, and regulations aiming at guiding and managing sustainable long-term actions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC PRESS-BALKEMA, 2018
Series
Reflections on Cultural Heritage Theories and Practices, ISSN 2576-3075, E-ISSN 2576-3083
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390244 (URN)000473806400019 ()978-1-351-01479-3 (ISBN)978-1-138-49861-7 (ISBN)
Conference
International Conference on Innovative Built Heritage Models and Preventive Systems (CHANGES), FEB 06-08, 2017, Leuven, BELGIUM
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Brosché, J., Legnér, M., Kreutz, J. & Ijla, A. (2017). Heritage under Attack: motives for targeting cultural property during armed conflict. International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), 23(3), 248-260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heritage under Attack: motives for targeting cultural property during armed conflict
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 248-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although attacks on cultural property have caused international outcry,our understanding of this phenomenon is still limited. In particular, littleresearch has been directed towards exploring the motivations for suchattacks. Therefore, we ask: What are the motives for attacking sites, buildingsor objects representing cultural heritage? By combining insights from peaceand conflict research with findings from heritage studies we present atypology of motivations for attacking cultural property. We identify four,not mutually exclusive, broad groups of motives: (i) attacks related to conflictgoals, in which cultural property is targeted because it is connected to theissue the warring parties are fighting over (ii), military-strategic attacks, inwhich the main motivation is to win tactical advantages in the conflict (iii),signalling attacks, in which cultural property is targeted as a low-risk targetthat signals the commitment of the aggressor, and (iv) economic incentiveswhere cultural property provides funding for warring parties. Our typologyoffers a theoretical structure for research about why, when, and by whom,cultural property is targeted. This is not only likely to provide academicbenefits, but also to contribute to the development of more effective toolsfor the protection of cultural property during armed conflict.

Keywords
Cultural heritage; cultural property; attacks; motives; armed conflict
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified History
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research; History of Art
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308993 (URN)10.1080/13527258.2016.1261918 (DOI)000393883600005 ()
Projects
Attacks on Cultural Heritages: Causes and Consequences Examined from a Multidisciplinary Perspective
Funder
Magnus Bergvall Foundation, 2015-00813
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-02Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, C. & Ijla, A. (2017). Museums – A Catalyst for Sustainable Economic Development in Sweden. International Journal of Innovative Development & Policy Studies, 5(2), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Museums – A Catalyst for Sustainable Economic Development in Sweden
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Innovative Development & Policy Studies, ISSN 2354-2926, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Museums have a great impact on the cultural economy of every country and museums have a very significant meaning for social integration within socio-cultural and socio-economic contexts. Studies have shown that the impact of museums may vary from one city to another, and from one country to another, at local, regional or national level. The role of museums in the cultural economy is very important, because they sustain cities in promoting themselves as cultural center‟s in the domestic and regional market by fulfilling their demands and expectations of visitors and investors. One can say that museums act as “the instruments” for cities in the regeneration process. Over time, it was considered that museums were created with the purpose of education, collecting, preservation and research, but because society evolved, the economic role of museums became increasingly important. Consequently, the role of museums has become more diverse in the 21st century, and they become key partners in the heritage and culture tourism industry and the creative and innovative industries as well. This paper seeks to explore the impact of museums on regional development in sustainable way. The Authors argue that museums have a multiplier effects on regional development and become an important tool for regional economies

Keywords
Museum, Economic Sustainable Development, Regional Development, and Cultural Heritage.
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Conservation (HGO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322245 (URN)
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-05-24Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, C. & Ijla, A. (2017). Museums: An incubator for sustainable social development and environmental protection. International Journal of Development and Sustainability, 5(9), 446-462, Article ID IJDS16111401.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Museums: An incubator for sustainable social development and environmental protection
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Development and Sustainability, ISSN 2186-8662, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 446-462, article id IJDS16111401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to contribute to the debate on the socio-cultural impact of museums on sustainable regional development. Museums play a significant role within socio-cultural and environmental sustainability contexts. Specifically, they foster a collective sense of place, collective memory, social integration, education and environmental awareness. They help sustain cities as dynamic socio-cultural centers, acting as “instruments” for cities in the revitalization process. In addition, they encourage cohesiveness among different sectors of society, tolerance, democracy, and economic growth. The authors recommend that governmental and non-governmental institutions include cultural heritage and museums as key factors in their future priorities in pursuing sustainable development at local, regional, and national levels. 

Keywords
Museum, Social Sustainable Development, Environmental Protection, Cultural Heritage
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Conservation (HGO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322256 (URN)
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-05-24Bibliographically approved
Ijla, A. & Broström, T. (2015). The Sustainable Viability of Adaptive Reuse of Historic Buildings: the experiences of Two World Heritage Old Cities; Bethlehem in Palestine and Visby in Sweden. International Invention Journal of Arts and Social Sciences, 2(4), 52-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Sustainable Viability of Adaptive Reuse of Historic Buildings: the experiences of Two World Heritage Old Cities; Bethlehem in Palestine and Visby in Sweden
2015 (English)In: International Invention Journal of Arts and Social Sciences, ISSN 2408-7238, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 52-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper aims at investigating the viability of adaptive reuse of abandoned buildings (religious, Nobel Architecture, residential, commercial, and other) and the impact it has on the sustainability of existing environment in Bethlehem and Visby. There are many historic buildings in Bethlehem and Visby that are unique in their history, architecture, and built environment. This paper explores the importance of adaptive reuse by looking at several examples of reused historic buildings in both cities. The examples illustrate the viability of adaptive reuse in terms of sustainability; economic impact, affordable function, vitality of social life, and usability of existing urban resources and energy saving. The paper advocates policy makers is to increase the adaptive reuse policy within abandoned old cities as an integral tool of regeneration and sustainability policies. A comparative study of Palestine (Bethlehem) and Sweden (Visby) focuses on the experiences of two cities where conversions have registered a significant impact in terms of new facilities and businesses creation and has had a positive impact on the life both city centers. A survey of building owners, governors and local community leadership in Bethlehem old city and the old city of Visby, interviews, and a review of literature concerning adaptive reuse of historic buildings are used as a tool of conducting qualitative and comparative research. The researcher’s perception is that adaptive reuse with social life regeneration, economic development activities, and energy efficiency serve the key concepts of sustainability; in addition to the local community perception of adaptive reuse as a viable option to demolition and redevelopment of existing facilities. The research recommends key implications for local governments in Sweden and Palestine as they eventually provide a theoretical framework that can be incorporated in the decision-making processes for adaptive reuse projects.

Keywords
Sustainable development, Adaptive reuse, Historic conservation
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
History of Art
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269800 (URN)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved
Ijla, A. (2015). Urban Ecology Concept and its Implication for Studying Social Integration: Case Study of the Palestinian Refugees. International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology, 7(1), Article ID 7BE04DC49905.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Ecology Concept and its Implication for Studying Social Integration: Case Study of the Palestinian Refugees
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology, ISSN 2006-988X, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 7BE04DC49905Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article aims to analyze the phenomena of urban segregation and social integration in the Palestinian refugee camps. The arguments are based on a theoretical basis as well as findings from the author’s fieldwork taken where he used to live in the Gaza refugee camp. The main argument of this paper claims that residential segregation and the creation of informal settlements in the city boundaries are exclusively associated with cultural, urban poverty, socio-political and historical aspects that reflect on the urban fabric of the camps. The author’s proposes that the roots of the phenomena of urban segregation and integration are an outcome of the constructed social strata, which can be theorized within two interrelated socio-political new situation of the refugees, and the historical, identity aspects; one defines them as refugees who should preserve their right and identity to go back home where the urban camp and social structure and fabric reflected this situation, and the other identifies the Israeli regime, social obstacles and life conditions in the received society as the negative factors that prevented the refugees to have the opportunity of assimilation. Additionally, the paper suggests that the ‘traditional approach’ in urban geography, based on Park’s premise, as having the basic hypothesis that the greater the degree of difference between spatial distribution of groups within the urban context, the greater their social distance from the other. This approach, in essence, views the integration process of the Palestinian refugees and the resettlement goals that the refugees struggled to achieve it temporarily to have the same opportunities as assimilated citizens in the West Bank and Gaza. The ecological approach of the Chicago School will be use to study the integration and assimilation phenomena.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: , 2015
Keywords
Social Integration, Refugees, Urban Ecology
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269804 (URN)10.5897/IJSA12.022 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved
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