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Márquez Segura, ElenaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3124-2286
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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Zhou, Z., Márquez Segura, E., Duval, J., John, M. & Isbister, K. (2019). Astaire: A Collaborative Mixed Reality Dance Game for Collocated Players. In: CHI PLAY'19: Proceedings Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play. Paper presented at Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play (CHI PLAY'19), Barcelona, Spain, Oct 22-25, 2019 (pp. 5-18).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Astaire: A Collaborative Mixed Reality Dance Game for Collocated Players
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2019 (English)In: CHI PLAY'19: Proceedings Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, 2019, p. 5-18Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite the growth of Virtual Reality (VR), the design space of collocated social play in VR remains narrow. Here we present Astaire, a collaborative hybrid VR dance game for two players sharing an HTC Vive VR system. The game resulted from a design research process using embodied design methods, and drawing upon concepts in HCI and Play Design, including social affordances, and asymmetric and interdependent play. Here we present insights from a study playtesting Astaire alongside two VR games that inspired ours: Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes (KTNE), and Audioshield. We examined players' and spectators' enjoyment, and interpersonal relationships, which were self-reported higher for Astaire. Using data from semi-structured interviews, we foreground design elements that impacted our participants' play experience, grouped under the themes of balance of players' roles, the physicality afforded by the game, and the social experience enabled. Our work contributes to opening the design space of hybrid collocated VR-through our game, we surface inspirational design concepts in HCI, and share design knowledge gained during our design process.

Keywords
Collocated Play, Social Play, Hybrid VR, VR, MR, Alternative Controllers, Embodied Sketching, Physicality, Gestural Excess, Spectatorship, Asymmetrical Play, Social Touch
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408057 (URN)10.1145/3311350.3347152 (DOI)000518632600003 ()
Conference
Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play (CHI PLAY'19), Barcelona, Spain, Oct 22-25, 2019
Available from: 2020-04-03 Created: 2020-04-03 Last updated: 2020-04-03Bibliographically approved
Turmo Vidal, L., Márquez Segura, E., Parrilla Bel, L. & Waern, A. (2019). BalBoa: A Balancing Board for Handstand Training. In: CHI EA '19 Extended Abstracts of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), MAY 04-09, 2019, Glasgow, SCOTLAND. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID LBW1414.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BalBoa: A Balancing Board for Handstand Training
2019 (English)In: CHI EA '19 Extended Abstracts of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id LBW1414Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Balance is an essential physical skill to master, but a challenging one given that it requires a heightened body awareness to control, maintain and develop. In HCI physical training research, the design space of technology support for developing such body awareness remains narrow. Here, we introduce BalBoa, a balancing board to support balance training during handstands. We describe key highlights of the design process behind the Balboa, and present a work-in-progress prototype, which we tested with handstand beginners and experts. We discuss feedback from our users, preliminary insights, and sketch the future steps towards a fully developed prototype.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019
Keywords
physical Training, Balance, Proprioception, Body Awareness, Embodied Interaction, Handstand
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387238 (URN)10.1145/3290607.3312909 (DOI)000482042102012 ()978-1-4503-5971-9 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), MAY 04-09, 2019, Glasgow, SCOTLAND
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Bertran, F. A., Duval, J., Isbister, K., Panella, O. G., Wilde, D., Badal Leon, L. & Márquez Segura, E. (2019). Chasing Play Potentials in Food Culture to Inspire Technology Design. In: CHI PLAY'19: Extended Abstracts Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play. Paper presented at Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play (CHI PLAY'19), Barcelona, Spain, Oct 22-25, 2019 (pp. 829-834).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chasing Play Potentials in Food Culture to Inspire Technology Design
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2019 (English)In: CHI PLAY'19: Extended Abstracts Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, 2019, p. 829-834Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We propose a Situated Play Design (SPD) workshop aimed at exploring how culture and traditions can guide playful design. Using food as an accessible starting point, we invite scholars from diverse communities to share, analyze, and make creative use of playful traditions, and prototype new and interesting eating experiences. Through hands-on engagement with traditions, play and technology, we will discuss strategies to make designerly use of forms of play that are embedded in culture. The outcomes of the workshop will be twofold: First, in response to recent calls for increasingly situated and emergent play design methods, we explore strategies to chase culturally-grounded play. Second, we produce an annotated portfolio of "play potentials" to inspire the design of future food-related technologies. The workshop will contribute to enriching the set of tools available for designers interested in play and technologies for everyday-use, in and beyond the food domain.

Keywords
Situated Play Design, Culture, Participatory Research through Design, Human-Food Interaction
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408060 (URN)10.1145/3341215.3349586 (DOI)000518428000101 ()
Conference
Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play (CHI PLAY'19), Barcelona, Spain, Oct 22-25, 2019
Available from: 2020-04-03 Created: 2020-04-03 Last updated: 2020-04-03Bibliographically approved
Márquez Segura, E., Turmo Vidal, L., Parilla Bel, L. & Waern, A. (2019). Circus, Play and Technology Probes: Training Body Awareness and Control with Children. In: Proceedings of the 2019 on Designing Interactive Systems Conference: . Paper presented at Designing Interactive Systems (pp. 1223-1236).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circus, Play and Technology Probes: Training Body Awareness and Control with Children
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2019 on Designing Interactive Systems Conference, 2019, p. 1223-1236Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Physical training can be frustrating and hard, especially for those who experience additional challenges to access and control their proprioceptive senses. In the context of designing for children with Sensory-based Motor Disorder, we designed and deployed a series of Training Technology Probes to be used in circus training. Here we focus on how these were used, tested, and appropriated by children and instructors during a six-week circus training course. Through these explorations, we identified a range of potential benefits from using their functions in training. We present the Physical Training Technology Probes and the benefits they brought to training. We show how the technology functions helped children focus and provided feedback related to posture and balance. Furthermore, their open-ended designs and versatile options for use were crucial in exploring their contributions to training, and in how they helped foster creative engagement with technology and training. Our work contributes towards understanding the specific requirements when designing for the target group, and more generally contributes with design strategies for technology support for skill training.

National Category
Human Aspects of ICT
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401220 (URN)10.1145/3322276.3322377 (DOI)
Conference
Designing Interactive Systems
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-01-07 Created: 2020-01-07 Last updated: 2020-01-07
Dagan, E., Bertran, F. A., Márquez Segura, E., Flores, M. & Isbister, K. (2019). Demo: A Social Wearable that Affords Vulnerability. In: UBICOMP/ISWC'19 ADJUNCT: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2019 ACM INTERNATIONAL JOINT CONFERENCE ON PERVASIVE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2019 ACM INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON WEARABLE COMPUTERS (pp. 272-273). ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demo: A Social Wearable that Affords Vulnerability
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2019 (English)In: UBICOMP/ISWC'19 ADJUNCT: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2019 ACM INTERNATIONAL JOINT CONFERENCE ON PERVASIVE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2019 ACM INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON WEARABLE COMPUTERS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019, p. 272-273Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present 'True Colors': a social wearable prototype designed to augment co-located social interaction of players in a LARP (live action role play). We designed it to enable the emergence of rich social dynamics between wearers and non-wearers. True Colors is Y-shaped, worn around the upper body, and has front and back interfaces to distinguish between actions taken by the wearer (front), and actions taken by others (back). To design True Colors, we followed a Research-through-Design approach, used experiential qualities and social affordances to guide our process, and co-designed with LARP designers. 13 True Colors wearables were deployed in a 3-day LARP event, attended by 109 people. From all the functionalities and interactivity the device afforded, players gravitated towards ones that emphasized the social value of experiencing vulnerability as a prompt to get together. This project was recently presented in CHI '19 [1] and may offer useful insights to others in the Ubi-Comp/ISWC community who develop technology to support co-located social experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY, 2019
Keywords
Social wearables, wearables, RtD, LARP, co-located social play, embodied interaction, social touch
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401991 (URN)10.1145/3341162.3350767 (DOI)000501543800071 ()
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Dagan, E., Márquez Segura, E., Bertran, F. A., Flores, M. & Isbister, K. (2019). Designing 'True Colors': A Social Wearable that Affords Vulnerability. In: CHI 2019: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Paper presented at CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), Glasgow, Scotland, May 04-09, 2019. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 33.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing 'True Colors': A Social Wearable that Affords Vulnerability
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2019 (English)In: CHI 2019: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id 33Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Vulnerability is a common experience in everyday life and is frequently perceived as a flaw to be excised in technology design. Yet, research indicates it is an essential aspect of wholehearted living among others. In this paper, we present the design and deployment of 'True Colors', a novel wearable device intended to support social interaction in a live action roleplay game (LARP) setting. We describe the Research-through Design process that helped us to discover and articulate the possibility space of vulnerability in the design of social wearables, as support for producing a sense of social empowerment and connection among wearers within the LARP. We draw conclusions that may be of value to others designing wearables and related technologies aimed at supporting co-located social interaction in games/play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019
Keywords
Social wearables, wearables, vulnerability, caring, interruptions, Research-through-Design, RtD, LARP, co-located social play, embodied interaction, play-to-lose, social affordances, social touch
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390350 (URN)10.1145/3290605.3300263 (DOI)000474467900033 ()978-1-4503-5970-2 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), Glasgow, Scotland, May 04-09, 2019
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Turmo Vidal, L., Márquez Segura, E., Christopher, B. & Waern, A. (2019). Enlightened Yoga:: Designing an Augmented Class with Wearable Lights to Support Instruction. In: : . Paper presented at DIS 2019 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, 23-28 June, 2019, San Diego. CA, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enlightened Yoga:: Designing an Augmented Class with Wearable Lights to Support Instruction
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Designing technology to support instructed physical training is challenging, due to how instructions rely on complex interactional and situational social processes. To support in-the-moment instruction, we engaged in a co-creative Research through Design process with a Yoga instructor. Together, we designed and deployed Enlightened Yoga: a training class featuring wearable projecting lights that augment the instructor's and trainee's movements, and highlight the orientation and positioning of key body parts. We present insights from the design process and a study of the class. We show how the wearable lights enabled a new shared frame of reference between instructor and trainees, that became instructable through the way participants could reference and orient themselves to it. This allowed the instructor to extend his instructional strategies, and enabled trainees to better act upon cues. We discuss how this was made possible by jointly designing the technology, its coupling with the body, instructions and exercises.

National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396569 (URN)10.1145/3322276.3322338 (DOI)978-1-4503-5850-7 (ISBN)
Conference
DIS 2019 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, 23-28 June, 2019, San Diego. CA, USA
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2020-04-29Bibliographically approved
Martin-Niedecken, A. L., Rogers, K., Turmo Vidal, L., Mekler, E. D. & Márquez Segura, E. (2019). ExerCube vs. Personal Trainer: Evaluating a Holistic, Immersive, and Adaptive Fitness Game Setup. In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Glasgow, Scotland, May 4-9, 2019 (pp. 1-15). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 88.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ExerCube vs. Personal Trainer: Evaluating a Holistic, Immersive, and Adaptive Fitness Game Setup
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 1-15, article id 88Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Today's spectrum of playful fitness solutions features systems that are clearly game-first or fitness-first in design; hardly any sufficiently incorporate both areas. Consequently, existing applications and evaluations often lack in focus on attractiveness and effectiveness, which should be addressed on the levels of body, controller, and game scenario following a holistic design approach. To contribute to this topic and as a proof-of-concept, we designed the ExerCube, an adaptive fitness game setup. We evaluated participants’ multi-sensory and bodily experiences with a non-adaptive and an adaptive ExerCube version and compared them with personal training to reveal insights to inform the next iteration of the ExerCube. Regarding flow, enjoyment and motivation, the ExerCube is on par with personal training. Results further reveal differences in perception of exertion, types and quality of movement, social factors, feedback, and audio experiences. Finally, we derive considerations for future research and development directions in holistic fitness game setups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019
Keywords
ExerCube, fitness game, exertion game, adaptivity, flow, gaming, physical training
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387236 (URN)10.1145/3290605.3300318 (DOI)000474467901017 ()978-1-4503-5970-2 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Glasgow, Scotland, May 4-9, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Misra, M., Márquez Segura, E. & Arif, A. S. (2019). Exploring the Pace of an Endless Runner Game in Stationary and Mobile Settings. In: CHI PLAY'19: Extended Abstracts Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play. Paper presented at Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play (CHI PLAY'19), Barcelona, Spain, Oct 22-25, 2019 (pp. 543-550). ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Pace of an Endless Runner Game in Stationary and Mobile Settings
2019 (English)In: CHI PLAY'19: Extended Abstracts Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019, p. 543-550Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We explore the effects of pace of an endless runner game on user performance, preference, enjoyment, and engagement in stationary and mobile settings (while walking). Results revealed that game pace affects performance in both settings. The number of attempts increases and the total score decreases exponentially with increasing pace. Enjoyment, engagement, and preference are unaffected, yet most users prefer a slower pace while walking. These findings encourage further research on how to manipulate game pace based on the player's mobility status and physiological state to improve the mobile gaming experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY, 2019
Keywords
Video game, mobile game, mobile phone, game pace, walking, running, workout
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408063 (URN)10.1145/3341215.3356256 (DOI)000518428000066 ()
Conference
Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play (CHI PLAY'19), Barcelona, Spain, Oct 22-25, 2019
Available from: 2020-04-03 Created: 2020-04-03 Last updated: 2020-04-03Bibliographically approved
Márquez Segura, E., Waern, A., Parilla Bel, L. & Turmo Vidal, L. (2019). Super Trouper: The Playful Potential of Interactive Circus Training. In: CHI PLAY '19 Extended Abstracts: Extended Abstracts of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts. Paper presented at 6th ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI PLAY), Barcelona, Spain, October 22-25, 2019 (pp. 511-518). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Super Trouper: The Playful Potential of Interactive Circus Training
2019 (English)In: CHI PLAY '19 Extended Abstracts: Extended Abstracts of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts, ACM Digital Library, 2019, p. 511-518Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Training can be challenging at times, and even more so to users with movement mastery and body awareness issues,. like children with sensory-based motor disorder (SBMD). They often experience less enjoyment when engaging with physical activities. In this project, our goal is to support physical training of children with SBMD through the design of playful training activities and technology. Drawing from our observations during a technology-supported circus training course with circus instructors, we identify play potentials that can inspire future technology and activity design. We surface key elements that supported the emergence of play and playfulness, including strategies used by the instructors, and technology features. We discuss how these can be built on in future design iterations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2019
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT
Research subject
Economics; Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401189 (URN)10.1145/3341215.3356282 (DOI)000518428000062 ()978-1-4503-6871-1 (ISBN)
Conference
6th ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI PLAY), Barcelona, Spain, October 22-25, 2019
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-01-07 Created: 2020-01-07 Last updated: 2020-04-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3124-2286

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