uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Katrantsiotis, C., Norstrom, E., Smittenberg, R. H., Finné, M., Weiberg, E., Hattestrand, M., . . . Wastegard, S. (2019). Climate changes in the Eastern Mediterranean over the last 5000 years and their links to the high-latitude atmospheric patterns and Asian monsoons. Global and Planetary Change, 175, 36-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate changes in the Eastern Mediterranean over the last 5000 years and their links to the high-latitude atmospheric patterns and Asian monsoons
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 175, p. 36-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research aims to improve the knowledge of the mid to late Holocene climate changes and the underlying drivers in the eastern Mediterranean. We focus on the Peloponnese peninsula, SW Greece, characterized by a W-E rainfall/temperature gradient and a strong climate-sensitivity to shifts in the large-scale atmospheric patterns. A radiocarbon-dated sediment core, taken from the ancient Lake Lerna, a former lake in NE Peloponnese, was analyzed for distribution and hydrogen isotope (δD) composition of n-alkanes and bulk organic geochemistry (δ13C, TOC). The predominantly macrophyte (submerged/floating)-derived δD23 profile exhibits the largest long-term fluctuation in the record and co-varies with δD of long-chain n-alkanes providing evidence for precipitation and temperature changes over the last 5000 years. The Lerna δD23 signal is sometimes in agreement with other n-alkane δD records from SW Peloponnese indicating wetter conditions in the peninsula at ca 5000–4600, ca 4500–4100, ca 3000–2600 (more unstable in SW) and after ca 700 cal BP with drier periods at ca 4100–3900 and ca 1000–700 cal BP. Conversely, a NE-SW climate see-saw is revealed at ca 4600–4500, ca 3200, ca 2600–1800, and ca 1200–1000 cal BP when the δD23 Lerna exhibits more positive trends (drier in NE) with a reversal at ca 3900–3300, ca 3200–3000 and ca 1800–1300 cal BP. These opposing and sometimes similar signals between NE and SW Peloponnese can be explained by the relative dominance of high-latitude atmospheric patterns over the peninsula. A similar signal would be expected when the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) exerts the main control with NAO (+) creating conditions of reduced moisture. The dipole pattern is likely driven by shifts in North Sea–Caspian Atmospheric pattern (NCP), which account for the present-day regional climate variability with NCP (+) leading to wetter and colder conditions in NE Peloponnese. The Asian monsoonal system likely has an additional impact on the δD variabilities through influencing the summer temperatures. There is a consistency between the Peloponnesian δD signals and monsoonal records after ca 4000 cal BP confirming the actualistic models. Strong monsoonal periods coincide with cooler summers (lower δD values) in Lerna, due to the northerly winds, the Etesians. On the contrary, SW Peloponnese is dominated by warmer conditions during the same periods as the area is located on the lee side of the mountain and highly influenced by the adiabatic warming associated with the subsidence over the Eastern Mediterranean.

Keywords
Biomarkers, Hydrogen isotope, Paleoclimate, Holocene, Monsoons, NAO, NCP, Mediterranean
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382656 (URN)10.1016/j.gloplacha.2019.02.001 (DOI)000463982700004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-4344Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1181
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Comas-Bru, L., Harrison, S. P., Werner, M., Rehfeld, K., Scroxton, N., Veiga-Pires, C., . . . Zhang, H. (2019). Evaluating model outputs using integrated global speleothem records of climate change since the last glacial. Climate of the Past, 15(4), 1557-1579
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating model outputs using integrated global speleothem records of climate change since the last glacial
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Climate of the Past, ISSN 1814-9324, E-ISSN 1814-9332, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 1557-1579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although quantitative isotope data from speleothems has been used to evaluate isotope-enabled model simulations, currently no consensus exists regarding the most appropriate methodology through which to achieve this. A number of modelling groups will be running isotope-enabled palaeoclimate simulations in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6, so it is timely to evaluate different approaches to using the speleothem data for data-model comparisons. Here, we illustrate this using 456 globally distributed speleothem delta O-18 records from an updated version of the Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and Analysis (SISAL) database and palaeoclimate simulations generated using the ECHAM5-wiso isotope-enabled atmospheric circulation model. We show that the SISAL records reproduce the first-order spatial patterns of isotopic variability in the modern day, strongly supporting the application of this dataset for evaluating model-derived isotope variability into the past. However, the discontinuous nature of many speleothem records complicates the process of procuring large numbers of records if data-model comparisons are made using the traditional approach of comparing anomalies between a control period and a given palaeoclimate experiment. To circumvent this issue, we illustrate techniques through which the absolute isotope values during any time period could be used for model evaluation. Specifically, we show that speleothem isotope records allow an assessment of a model's ability to simulate spatial isotopic trends. Our analyses provide a protocol for using speleothem isotope data for model evaluation, including screening the observations to take into account the impact of speleothem mineralogy on delta O-18 values, the optimum period for the modern observational baseline and the selection of an appropriate time window for creating means of the isotope data for palaeo-time-slices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH, 2019
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393615 (URN)10.5194/cp-15-1557-2019 (DOI)000480317900001 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 694481
Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Bonnier, A., Finné, M. & Weiberg, E. (2019). Examining Land-Use through GIS-Based Kernel Density Estimation: A Re-Evaluation of Legacy Data from the Berbati-Limnes Survey. Journal of field archaeology, 44(2), 70-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining Land-Use through GIS-Based Kernel Density Estimation: A Re-Evaluation of Legacy Data from the Berbati-Limnes Survey
2019 (English)In: Journal of field archaeology, ISSN 0093-4690, E-ISSN 2042-4582, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 70-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of archaeological survey data for evaluation of landscape dynamics has commonly been concerned with the distribution of settlements and changes in number of recorded sites over time. Here we present a new quantitative approach to survey-based legacy data, which allows further assessments of the spatial configuration of possible land-use areas. Utilizing data from an intensive archaeological survey in the Berbati-Limnes area, Greece, we demonstrate how GIS-based kernel density estimations (KDE) can be used to produce cluster-based density surfaces that may be linked to past land-use strategies. By relating density surfaces to elevation and slope, it is also possible to quantify shifts in the use of specific environments on a regional scale, allowing us to model and visualize land-use dynamics over time. In this respect, the approach provides more multifaceted information to be drawn from archaeological legacy data, providing an extended platform for research on human-environment interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
landscape archaeology, legacy data, archaeological GIS, kernel density estimation, archaeological survey, ancient land-use, Berbati-Limnes survey
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379264 (URN)10.1080/00934690.2019.1570481 (DOI)000459639200001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1181
Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Walsh, K., Berger, J.-F., Roberts, C. N., Vanniere, B., Ghilardi, M., Brown, A. G., . . . Verstraeten, G. (2019). Holocene demographic fluctuations, climate and erosion in the Mediterranean: A meta data-analysis. The Holocene, 29(5), 864-885
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holocene demographic fluctuations, climate and erosion in the Mediterranean: A meta data-analysis
Show others...
2019 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 864-885Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As part of the Changing the Face of the Mediterranean Project, we consider how human pressure and concomitant erosion has affected a range of Mediterranean landscapes between the Neolithic and, in some cases, the post-medieval period. Part of this assessment comprises an investigation of relationships among palaeodemographic data, evidence for vegetation change and some consideration of rapid climate change events. The erosion data include recent or hitherto unpublished work from the authors. Where possible, we consider summed probabilities of 14C dates as well as the first published synthesis of all known optically stimulated luminescence dated sequences. The results suggest that while there were some periods when erosion took place contemporaneously across a number of regions, possibly induced by climate changes, more often than not, we see a complex and heterogeneous interplay of demographic and environmental changes that result in a mixed pattern of erosional activity across the Mediterranean.

Keywords
demography, erosion, geoarchaeology, Holocene, human impact, Mediterranean
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378974 (URN)10.1177/0959683619826637 (DOI)000468293200011 ()2-s2.0-85061917004 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Finné, M., Woodbridge, J., Labuhn, I. & Roberts, C. N. (2019). Holocene hydro-climatic variability in the Mediterranean: A synthetic multi-proxy reconstruction. The Holocene, 29(5), 847-863
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holocene hydro-climatic variability in the Mediterranean: A synthetic multi-proxy reconstruction
2019 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 847-863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here we identify and analyze proxy data interpreted to reflect hydro-climatic variability over the last 10,000 years from the Mediterranean region to (1) outline millennial and multi-centennial-scale trends and (2) identify regional patterns of hydro-climatic variability. A total of 47 lake, cave, and marine records were transformed to z-scores to allow direct comparisons between sites, put on a common time scale, and binned into 200-year time slices. Six different regions were identified based on numerical and spatial analyzes of z-scores: S Iberia and Maghreb, N Iberia, Italy, the Balkans, Turkey, and the Levant, and the overall hydro-climate history of each region was reconstructed. N Iberia is largely decoupled from the five other regions throughout the Holocene. Wetter conditions occur in the five other regions between 8500 and 6100 yr BP. After 6000 yr BP, climate oscillated until around 3000 ± 300 yr BP, which seems to have been the overall driest period in the eastern Mediterranean and North Africa. In contrast, Italy and N Iberia seem to have remained wetter during this period. In addition, non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) was applied to 18 long, continuous climate z-score records that span the majority of the Holocene. nMDS axes 1 and 2 illustrate the main trends in the z-score data. The first axis captures a long-term development of drier condition in the Mediterranean from 7900 to 3700 yr BP. Rapid shifts occur in nMDS axis 2 at 6700–6300 BP, 4500–4300 BP, and 3500–3300 BP indicating centennial-scale climate change. Our synthesis highlights a dominant south/east versus north/west Mediterranean hydro-climate dipole throughout the Holocene and therefore confirms that there was no single climate trajectory characterizing the whole Mediterranean basin during the last 10 millennia.

Keywords
Holocene, hydro-climate, Mediterranean, nMDS, paleoclimate, proxy synthesis
National Category
Climate Research Physical Geography
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378966 (URN)10.1177/0959683619826634 (DOI)000468293200010 ()s2.0-85061579077 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1181
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Finné, M., Salonen, S., Frank, N., Helmens, K. F., Schröder-Ritzrau, A., Deininger, M. & Holzkämper, S. (2019). Last Interglacial Climate in Northern Sweden - Insights from a Speleothem Record. QUATERNARY, 2(3), Article ID 29.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Last Interglacial Climate in Northern Sweden - Insights from a Speleothem Record
Show others...
2019 (English)In: QUATERNARY, ISSN 2571-550X, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Continental records with absolute dates of the timing and progression of climatic conditions during the Last Interglacial (LIG) from northern Europe are rare. Speleothems from northern Europe have a large potential as archives for LIG environmental conditions since they were formed in sheltered environments and may be preserved beneath ice sheets. Here, we present delta C-13 and delta O-18 values from speleothem Kf-21, from Korallgrottan in Jamtland (northwest Sweden). Kf-21 is dated with five MC-ICPMS U-Th dates with errors smaller than similar to 1 ka. Kf-21 started forming at similar to 130.2 ka and the main growth phase with relatively constant growth rates lasted from 127.3 ka to 124.4 ka, after which calcite formation ceased. Both delta C-13 and delta O-18 show rapid shifts but also trends, with a range of values within their Holocene counterparts from Korallgrottan. Our results indicate an early onset of the LIG in northern Europe with ice-free conditions at similar to 130 ka. Higher growth rates combined with more negative delta O-18 values between similar to 127.3 and 126.8 ka, interpreted here as warmer and more humid conditions, as well as indications of a millennial-scale cold spell centered at 126.2 ka, resemble findings from speleothem records from other parts of Europe, highlighting that these were regional scale climatic patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Last Interglacial (LIG), speleothem, stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, climate variability, Scandinavia, Sweden
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395920 (URN)10.3390/quat2030029 (DOI)000487949900007 ()
Funder
Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKBAcademy of Finland, 1310649
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Weiberg, E., Bevan, A., Kouli, K., Katsianis, M., Woodbridge, J., Bonnier, A., . . . Shennan, S. (2019). Long-term trends of land use and demography in Greece: A comparative study. The Holocene, 29(5), 742-760
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term trends of land use and demography in Greece: A comparative study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 742-760Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper offers a comparative study of land use and demographic development in northern and southern Greece from the Neolithic to the Byzantine period. Results from summed probability densities (SPD) of archaeological radiocarbon dates and settlement numbers derived from archaeological site surveys are combined with results from cluster-based analysis of published pollen core assemblages to offer an integrated view of human pressure on the Greek landscape through time. We demonstrate that SPDs offer a useful approach to outline differences between regions and a useful complement to archaeological site surveys, evaluated here especially for the onset of the Neolithic and for the Final Neolithic (FN)/Early Bronze Age (EBA) transition. Pollen analysis highlight differences in vegetation between the two sub-regions, but also several parallel changes. The comparison of land cover dynamics between two sub-regions of Greece further demonstrates the significance of the bioclimatic conditions of core locations and that apparent oppositions between regions may in fact be two sides of the same coin in terms of socio-ecological trajectories. We also assess the balance between anthropogenic and climate-related impacts on vegetation and suggest that climatic variability was as an important factor for vegetation regrowth. Finally, our evidence suggests that the impact of humans on land cover is amplified from the Late Bronze Age (LBA) onwards as more extensive herding and agricultural practices are introduced.

Keywords
archaeology, Greece, land cover, land use, pollen, summed probability densities
National Category
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History
Research subject
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377125 (URN)10.1177/0959683619826641 (DOI)000468293200004 ()
Projects
Domesticated Landscapes of the Peloponnese (DoLP)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1181
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Weiberg, E., Hughes, R. E., Finné, M., Bonnier, A. & Kaplan, J. O. (2019). Mediterranean land use systems from prehistory to antiquity: a case study from Peloponnese (Greece). Journal of Land Use Science, 14(1), 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediterranean land use systems from prehistory to antiquity: a case study from Peloponnese (Greece)
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Land Use Science, ISSN 1747-423X, E-ISSN 1747-4248, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the sustainability of land use systems over time requires an accounting of the diversity of land uses and their varying influences on the environment. Here we present a standardized review of land use systems in the Peloponnese, Greece, from the Neolithic to the Roman period (similar to 6500 BC-AD 300). Using a combination of sources, we synthesize the fundamental information required to characterize and quantify the spatial requirements of land use. We contextualize our results in a discussion of temporal trends, the probable drivers of change, and how these changes can be integrated with the general knowledge of these societies and the overall effect of land use across time. While our review concentrates on the Peloponnese, our methodology is widely applicable where suitable archaeological and historical records are available, and is broadly representative of the prehistoric and early historical evolution of agricultural land use systems in the eastern Mediterranean.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
Sustainable land use, land use modelling, human-environment interactions, Aegean prehistory, classical antiquity, Greece
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396137 (URN)10.1080/1747423X.2019.1639836 (DOI)000475973000001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1181EU, European Research Council, 313797
Available from: 2019-11-08 Created: 2019-11-08 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Weiberg, E., Hughes, R. E., Finné, M., Bonnier, A. & Kaplan, J. O. (2019). Mediterranean land use systems from prehistory to antiquity: a case study from Peloponnese (Greece). Journal of Land Use Science, 14(1), 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediterranean land use systems from prehistory to antiquity: a case study from Peloponnese (Greece)
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Land Use Science, ISSN 1747-423X, E-ISSN 1747-4248, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the sustainability of land use systems over time requires an accounting of the diversity of land uses and their varying influences on the environment. Here we present a standardized review of land use systems in the Peloponnese, Greece, from the Neolithic to the Roman period (similar to 6500 BC-AD 300). Using a combination of sources, we synthesize the fundamental information required to characterize and quantify the spatial requirements of land use. We contextualize our results in a discussion of temporal trends, the probable drivers of change, and how these changes can be integrated with the general knowledge of these societies and the overall effect of land use across time. While our review concentrates on the Peloponnese, our methodology is widely applicable where suitable archaeological and historical records are available, and is broadly representative of the prehistoric and early historical evolution of agricultural land use systems in the eastern Mediterranean.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS, 2019
Keywords
Sustainable land use, land use modelling, human-environment interactions, Aegean prehistory, classical antiquity, Greece
National Category
Climate Research Classical Archaeology and Ancient History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396817 (URN)10.1080/1747423X.2019.1639836 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1181EU, European Research Council, 313797
Available from: 2019-11-11 Created: 2019-11-11 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Woodbridge, J., Roberts, C. N., Palmisano, A., Bevan, A., Shennan, S., Fyfe, R., . . . Labuhn, I. (2019). Pollen-inferred regional vegetation patterns and demographic change in Southern Anatolia through the Holocene. The Holocene, 29(5), 728-741
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pollen-inferred regional vegetation patterns and demographic change in Southern Anatolia through the Holocene
Show others...
2019 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 728-741Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Southern Anatolia is a highly significant area within the Mediterranean, particularly in terms of understanding how agriculture moved into Europe from neighbouring regions. This study uses pollen, palaeoclimate and archaeological evidence to investigate the relationships between demography and vegetation change, and to explore how the development of agriculture varied spatially. Data from 21 fossil pollen records have been transformed into forested, parkland and open vegetation types using cluster analysis. Patterns of change have been explored using non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and through analysis of indicator groups, such as an Anthropogenic Pollen Index, and Simpson’s Diversity. Settlement data, which indicate population densities, and summed radiocarbon dates for archaeological sites have been used as a proxy for demographic change. The pollen and archaeological records confirm that farming can be detected earlier in Anatolia in comparison with many other parts of the Mediterranean. Dynamics of change in grazing indicators and the OJCV (Olea, Juglans, Castanea and Vitis) index for cultivated trees appear to match cycles of population expansion and decline. Vegetation and land use change is also influenced by other factors, such as climate change. Investigating the early impacts of anthropogenic activities (e.g. woodcutting, animal herding, the use of fire and agriculture) is key to understanding how societies have modified the environment since the mid–late Holocene, despite the capacity of ecological systems to absorb recurrent disturbances. The results of this study suggest that shifting human population dynamics played an important role in shaping land cover in central and southern Anatolia.

Keywords
Anatolia, archaeology, demography, land cover, pollen, vegetation
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378976 (URN)10.1177/0959683619826635 (DOI)000468293200003 ()2-s2.0-85061751118 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7433-268x

Search in DiVA

Show all publications