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Neuman, N., Nowicka, P. & Eli, K. (2018). Feeding the extended family: Gender, generation, and socioeconomic disadvantage in food provision to children. Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeding the extended family: Gender, generation, and socioeconomic disadvantage in food provision to children
2018 (English)In: Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, ISSN 1552-8014, E-ISSN 1751-7443Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

This paper examines how US parents and grandparents describe their provision of food to preschool-age children. Drawing on 49 interviews with 16 families, most of which were socio-economically disadvantaged, we argue that gender and generation intersect in everyday efforts to care for children’s eating. The analysis explores gendered divisions of foodwork, highlights the struggles of single mothers, and examines fathers’ redefinitions of the paternal role to include feeding and caring for children. At the core of the analysis, however, is the participants’ emphasis on grandmothers as sources of knowledge and support, with both fathers and mothers citing grandmothers and other women of earlier generations as culinary influences and as role models for good parenting. We thus discuss “feeding the extended family,” and conclude with a discussion about moving beyond the couple-focused paradigm of parenting in research on food and the gendered division of foodwork.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Cultural Studies Gender Studies Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357920 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-08-22 Last updated: 2018-08-23
Lövestam, E., Neuman, N. & Nowicka, P. (2018). Kritisk dietetik: självreflektion, ödmjukhet och dialog [Letter to the editor]. DietistAktuellt, XXVII(2), 46-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kritisk dietetik: självreflektion, ödmjukhet och dialog
2018 (Swedish)In: DietistAktuellt, Vol. XXVII, no 2, p. 46-48Article in journal, Letter (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Tack vare medel från Vetenskapsrådet och Letterstedtska föreningen anordnade vi den 25 augusti konferensen ”The 1st Scandinavian Critical Dietetics Conference”, som syftade till att introducera ämnet kritisk dietetik i Sverige. I Dietistaktuellt nr 6 2017 skriver redaktören Magnus Forslin en personlig reflektion på åtta sidor där han angriper konferensen och de diskussioner som fördes där. Tonen i texten – kombinerat med associationer till bl a förintelseförnekelse och stalinism samt hånfulla illustrationer – inbjuder tyvärr inte till dialog. Istället för att ge oss in i en debatt på de premisserna tar vi tillfället i akt att kort och koncist lyfta några punkter om kritisk dietetik som vi gärna förtydligar. Då många av de antaganden och insinuationer som görs i artikeln saknar grund vill vi också bjuda in Dietistaktuellts läsare att själva ta del av konferensens presentationer, vilka ligger öppet på Institutionen för kostvetenskap, Uppsala Universitets webbplats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bjuv: , 2018
Keywords
dietetik, kostvetenskap, socioekonomi, ojämlikhet
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
History of Art
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341378 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-06849
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved
Somaraki, M., Eli, K., Sorjonen, K., Flodmark, C.-E., Marcus, C., Faith, M. S., . . . Nowicka, P. (2018). Perceived child eating behaviours and maternal migrant background. Appetite
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived child eating behaviours and maternal migrant background
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2018 (English)In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

The Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) is a well-established instrument in the study of obesity-relatedeating behaviours among children. However, research using the CEBQ in multicultural samples is limited. This studyaims to identify and examine differences in child eating behaviours as reported by Swedish-born and non-Swedishbornmothers living in Sweden. Mothers (n=1310, 74 countries of origin, mean age 36.5 years, 63.6% with highereducation, 29.2% with overweight or obesity) of five-year-olds (mean age 4.8 years, 18.1% with overweight or obesity)completed the CEBQ. Responses were analysed using CEBQ subscales Food Responsiveness, EmotionalOvereating, Enjoyment of Food, and Desire to Drink, clustering into Food Approach, and subscales SatietyResponsiveness, Slowness in Eating, Emotional Undereating, and Food Fussiness, clustering into Food Avoidance.Data were compared across seven regional groups, divided by maternal place of birth: (1) Sweden (n=941), (2) Nordicand Western Europe (n=68), (3) Eastern and Southern Europe (n=97), (4) the Middle East and North Africa (n=110),(5) East, South and Southeast Asia (n=52), (6) Sub-Saharan Africa (n=16), and (7) Central and South America (n=26).Crude, partly and fully adjusted linear regression models controlled for child’s and mother’s weight status, age,mother’s education, and concern about child weight. The moderation effect of maternal concern about child weightwas examined through interaction analyses. Results showed that while Food Approach and Food Avoidancebehaviours were associated with maternal migrant background, associations for Food Fussiness were limited. Notably,mothers born in the Middle East and North Africa reported higher frequencies of both Food Approach (except forEnjoyment of Food) and Food Avoidance. The study highlights the importance of examining how regionally-specificmaternal migrant background affects mothers’ perceptions of child eating behaviours.

Keywords
appetite, children, culture, family, overweight, obesity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341465 (URN)10.1016/j.appet.2018.02.010 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-02404
Available from: 2018-02-09 Created: 2018-02-09 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Sandvik, P., Ek, A., Somaraki, M., Hammar, U., Eli, K. & Nowicka, P. (2018). Picky eating in Swedish preschoolers of different weight status: application of two new screening cut-offs. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15(74)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Picky eating in Swedish preschoolers of different weight status: application of two new screening cut-offs
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 15, no 74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Characteristics of picky eaters of different weight status have not been sufficiently investigated. We used two newly developed screening cut-offs for picky eating in the Food fussiness (FF) subscale of the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ) to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of picky eaters in preschool-aged children with thinness, normal weight, overweight or obesity.

Methods

Data for 1272 preschoolers (mean age 4.9 years) were analyzed. The parent-reported FF subscale ranges from 1 to 5, and two screening cut-offs were applied to classify children as picky eaters (3.0 and 3.33). Structural Equation Modeling was used to study associations with other factors in the CEBQ, the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) and the Lifestyle Behavior Checklist (LBC). Scores were compared separately for each weight status group.

Results

Nearly half of the children were classified as moderate or severe picky eaters (cut-off 3.0) and 30% as severe (cut-off 3.33). For both cut-offs, prevalence was significantly lower in the obesity group. Still, one-third of children with obesity met the cut-off of 3.0 and 17% met the cut-off of 3.33. While picky eaters displayed similar patterns across weight status groups, some differences emerged. Food responsiveness was lower for picky eaters, but the difference was significant only among children with obesity. Slowness in eating was not as pronounced among picky eaters in the obesity group. In the overweight and obesity groups, parents of picky eaters did not report as high pressure to eat, as compared to the thinness or normal weight groups; in the obesity group, parents of picky eaters also perceived their children’s weight as lower. In all weight status groups, parents of picky eaters were more likely to report their children had too much screen time, complained about physical activity, and expressed negative affect toward food.

Conclusions

Picky eating was less common but still prevalent among children with obesity. Future studies should investigate the potential influence of picky eating on childhood overweight and obesity. Moreover, as children with picky eating display higher emotional sensitivity, further research is needed to understand how to create positive eating environments particularly for children with picky eating and obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2018
Keywords
appetite traits, eating behavior, obesity, parents, parenting practices, preschoolers, screening, sensory hypersensitivity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357235 (URN)10.1186/s12966-018-0706-0 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-22
Mazur, A., Caroli, M., Radziewicz-Winnicki, I., Nowicka, P., Weghuber, D., Neubauer, D., . . . Hadjipanayis, A. (2018). Reviewing and addressing the link between mass media and the increase in obesity among European children: The European Academy of Paediatrics (EAP) and The European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) consensus statement.. Acta Paediatrica, 107, 568-576
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reviewing and addressing the link between mass media and the increase in obesity among European children: The European Academy of Paediatrics (EAP) and The European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) consensus statement.
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2018 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, p. 568-576Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study reviewed the link between social media and the growing epidemic of childhood obesity in Europe. A task force from the European Academy of Paediatrics and the European Childhood Obesity Group searched published literature and developed a consensus statement. It found that there was evidence of a strong link between obesity levels across European countries and childhood media exposure and that parents and society needed a better understanding of the influence of social media on dietary habits.

CONCLUSION: Health policies in Europe must take account of the range of social media influences that promote the development of childhood obesity.

Keywords
Childhood obesity, Consensus statement, Food advertising, Mass media, Obesity prevention
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334537 (URN)10.1111/apa.14136 (DOI)000427002500006 ()29164673 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Bergman, K., Persson Osowski, C., Eli, K., Lövestam, E., Elmståhl, H. & Nowicka, P. (2018). Stakeholder responses to governmental dietary guidelines: Challenging the status quo, or reinforcing it?. British Food Journal, 120(3), 613-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stakeholder responses to governmental dietary guidelines: Challenging the status quo, or reinforcing it?
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2018 (English)In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 613-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how stakeholders in the food and nutrition field construct and conceptualise “appropriate” national dietary advice.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 40 voluntarily written stakeholder responses to updated official dietary guidelines in Sweden were analysed thematically. The analysis explored the logics and arguments employed by authorities, interest organisations, industry and private stakeholders in attempting to influence the formulation of dietary guidelines.

Findings

Two main themes were identified: the centrality of anchoring advice scientifically and modes of getting the message across to the public. Stakeholders expressed a view of effective health communication as that which is nutritionally and quantitatively oriented and which optimises individuals’ capacities to take action for their own health. Their responses did not offer alternative framings of how healthy eating could be practiced but rather conveyed an understanding of dietary guidelines as documents that provide simplified answers to complex questions.

Practical implications

Policymakers should be aware of industrial actors’ potential vested interests and actively seek out other stakeholders representing communities and citizen interests. The next step should be to question the extent to which it is ethical to publish dietary advice that represents a simplified way of conceptualising behavioural change, and thereby places responsibility for health on the individual.

Originality/value

This research provides a stakeholder perspective on the concept of dietary advice and is among the first to investigate referral responses to dietary guidelines.

Keywords
Food policy, Concept of advice, Dietary guidelines, Nutritional reductionism, Stakeholder influences
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341383 (URN)10.1108/BFJ-08-2017-0466 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Shrewsbury, V. A., Burrows, T., Ho, M., Jensen, M., Garnett, S. P., Stewart, L., . . . Collins, C. (2018). Update of the best practice dietetic management of overweight and obese children and adolescents: a systematic review protocol. The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 16(7), 1495-1502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Update of the best practice dietetic management of overweight and obese children and adolescents: a systematic review protocol
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2018 (English)In: The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, E-ISSN 2202-4433, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1495-1502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: To update an existing systematic review series of randomized controlled trials (RCT) that include a dietary intervention for the management of overweight or obesity in children or adolescents. Specifically, the review questions are: In randomized controlled trials of interventions which include a dietary intervention for the management of overweight or obesity in children or adolescents.

Keywords
children, obesity, parents, treatment
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356219 (URN)10.11124/JBISRIR-2017-003603 (DOI)29995710 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-19 Created: 2018-07-19 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Somaraki, M., Eli, K., Ek, A., Lindberg, L., Nyman, J., Marcus, C., . . . Nowicka, P. (2017). Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background: An analysis of a multicultural sample. Public Health Nutrition, 20(5), 848-858
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background: An analysis of a multicultural sample
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2017 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 848-858Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Parental feeding practices shape children's relationships with food and eating. Feeding is embedded socioculturally in values and attitudes related to food and parenting. However, few studies have examined associations between parental feeding practices and migrant background.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Parental feeding practices (restriction, pressure to eat, monitoring) were assessed using the Child Feeding Questionnaire. Differences were explored in four sub-samples grouped by maternal place of birth: Sweden, Nordic/Western Europe, Eastern/Southern Europe and countries outside Europe. Crude, partly and fully adjusted linear regression models were created. Potential confounding variables included child's age, gender and weight status, and mother's age, weight status, education and concern about child weight.

SETTING: Malmö and Stockholm, Sweden.

SUBJECTS: Mothers (n 1325, representing seventy-three countries; mean age 36·5 years; 28·1 % of non-Swedish background; 30·7 % with overweight/obesity; 62·8 % with university education) of pre-school children (mean age 4·8 years; 50·8 % boys; 18·6 % with overweight/obesity).

RESULTS: Non-Swedish-born mothers, whether European-born or non-European-born, were more likely to use restriction. Swedish-born mothers and Nordic/Western European-born mothers reported lower levels of pressure to eat compared with mothers born in Eastern/Southern Europe and mothers born outside Europe. Differences in monitoring were small. Among the potential confounding variables, child weight status and concern about child weight were highly influential. Concern about child weight accounted for some of the effect of maternal origin on restriction.

CONCLUSIONS: Non-European-born mothers were more concerned about children being overweight and more likely to report controlling feeding practices. Future research should examine acculturative and structural factors underlying differences in feeding.

Keywords
feeding practices, migration, obesity, preschoolers
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303353 (URN)10.1017/S1368980016002834 (DOI)000398199000010 ()27866503 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-17 Created: 2016-09-17 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, A., Jörnvi, A. & Nowicka, P. (2017). Dietisters erfarenhet av motiverande samtal inom öppenvård. Dietistaktuellt, 26(3), 48-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietisters erfarenhet av motiverande samtal inom öppenvård
2017 (Swedish)In: Dietistaktuellt, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 48-53Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

Som dietist möter man människor i behov av en livsstilsförändring. Ett sätt att bidra till detta är genom motiverande samtal, på engelska motivational interviewing (MI). MI är en samtalsmetod som blivit uppmärksammad under de senaste åren av forskare och kliniker. Evidensen är blandad. En del studier visar att MI är en effektiv metod för att hjälpa människor att genomföra livsstilsförändringar, medan andra visar att MI inte är bättre i jämförelse med annan behandling. Majoriteten av forskningen har fokuserat på andra personalgrupper inom hälso- och sjukvården än dietister. I denna studie har vi därför tillfrågat 139 dietister i Sverige om deras erfarenheter av MI. Resultaten visar en genomgående positiv inställning till MI men indikerar också på ett antal brister och hinder till användningen. 

National Category
Other Social Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329409 (URN)
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2017-09-14Bibliographically approved
Bergman, K., Elmståhl, H., Lövestam, E., Nowicka, P., Eli, K. & Persson Osowski, C. (2017). Healthy eating as conceptualized in referral responses to Sweden’s updated dietary guidelines: excluding the complexity of everyday life. In: : . Paper presented at Fifth BSA Sociology of Food Study Group Conference 2017 Food and Society, London 26 June-27 June..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy eating as conceptualized in referral responses to Sweden’s updated dietary guidelines: excluding the complexity of everyday life
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

National Dietary Guidelines have been published in many countries to support healthier food habits among the public. In Sweden, the guidelines are produced in a process involving experts and stakeholders under the responsibility of the National Food Agency. Stakeholder perspectives on the concept of state dietary advice was explored in this study, by analyzing 40 referral responses on updated guidelines in Sweden 2015. The study focused on ideas about how state dietary advice should be framed and what it should be based on. Thematic analysis was used and resulted in two main themes. 'Securing scientifically proven advice' represented a perspective of the guidelines as to be scientifically correct and verified, and built upon an underlying assumption to present an objective and optimal composition of foods and nutrients that will fit all. Arguments based on nutritional reductionism could be seen, which gave a delimited idea of what healthy food is. 'Getting the message across' represented a perspective of the guidelines to be easily understood by and inclusive to the end user. Clarity in advice was seen to be reached by explaining difficult words, defining amounts and exact mechanisms of why something is a good choice. Also this perspective added to excluding other values of food, especially qualitative ones. The construction of a healthy diet in these remittance responses builds upon a notion of an ideal diet composed on the basis of the best scientific proof and clearly presented so as to be easily understood and practiced. It was clearly based on an individualistic behavioral view making the individual responsible to make informed and good choices for a healthy diet. This approach may be questioned, as it is too simplified to include the complex reality of everyday life.

Keywords
dietary guidelines
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328784 (URN)
Conference
Fifth BSA Sociology of Food Study Group Conference 2017 Food and Society, London 26 June-27 June.
Available from: 2017-08-31 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2017-10-04
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9707-8768

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