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Nelander, Maria
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Bergman, L., Torres-Vergara, P., Penny, J., Wikström, J., Nelander, M., Leon, J., . . . Escudero, C. (2019). Investigating Maternal Brain Alterations in Preeclampsia: the Need for a Multidisciplinary Effort. Current Hypertension Reports, 21(9), Article ID 72.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating Maternal Brain Alterations in Preeclampsia: the Need for a Multidisciplinary Effort
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2019 (English)In: Current Hypertension Reports, ISSN 1522-6417, E-ISSN 1534-3111, Vol. 21, no 9, article id 72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying cerebral pathophysiology and to highlight possible methods for evaluation, screening, and surveillance of cerebral complications in preeclampsia.

RECENT FINDINGS: The pathophysiology of eclampsia remains enigmatic. Animal studies show that the cerebral circulation in pregnancy and preeclampsia might be affected with increased permeability over the blood-brain barrier and altered cerebral blood flow due to impaired cerebral autoregulation. The increased blood pressure cannot be the only underlying cause of eclampsia and cerebral edema, since some cases of eclampsia arise without simultaneous hypertension. Findings from animal studies need to be confirmed in human tissues. Evaluation of brain alterations in preeclampsia and eclampsia is challenging and demands a multidisciplinary collaboration, since no single method can accurately and fully describe how preeclampsia affects the brain. Cerebral complications of preeclampsia are significant factors in maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. No single method can accurately describe the full picture of how preeclampsia affects the brain vasculature and parenchyma. We recommend an international and multidisciplinary effort not only to overcome the issue of limited sample availability but also to optimize the quality of research.

Keywords
Biomarkers, Blood-brain barrier, Brain complications, Brain imaging, Eclampsia, Preclinical studies, Preeclampsia
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392990 (URN)10.1007/s11906-019-0977-0 (DOI)000479197200001 ()31375930 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Hannsberger, D., Sundström Poromaa, I., Bergman, L., Weis, J., Åkerud, H., . . . Wikström, A.-K. (2018). Assessment of cerebral perfusion and edema in preeclampsia with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 97(10), 1212-1218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of cerebral perfusion and edema in preeclampsia with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.
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2018 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1212-1218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Cerebral complications are the main reasons for morbidity and mortality in preeclampsia and eclampsia. As yet, we do not know whether the pathophysiology entails hypo- or hyperperfusion of the brain, or how and when edema emerges, due to the difficulty of examining the cerebral circulation.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have used a non-invasive diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging technique, intravoxel incoherent motion, to study cerebral perfusion on the capillary level and cerebral edema in women with preeclampsia (n = 30), normal pregnancy (n = 32), and non-pregnant women (n = 16). Estimates of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, and edema were measured in 5 different regions. These points were chosen to represent blood supply areas of both the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries, and to include both white and gray matter.

RESULTS: Except for the caudate nucleus, we did not detect any differences in cerebral perfusion measures on a group level. In the caudate nucleus, we found lower cerebral blood volume and lower blood flow in preeclampsia than in either normal pregnancy (P = .01 and P = .03, respectively) or non-pregnant women (both P = .02). No differences in edema were detected between study groups.

CONCLUSION: The cerebral perfusion measures were comparable between the study groups, except for a portion of the basal ganglia where hypoperfusion was detected in preeclampsia but not in normal pregnancy or non-pregnant women.

Keywords
cerebral circulation, eclampsia, edema, intravoxel incoherent motion, magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion, preeclampsia
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357423 (URN)10.1111/aogs.13383 (DOI)000444070900010 ()29786833 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Wikström, A.-K., Weis, J., Bergman, L., Larsson, A., Sundström Poromaa, I. & Wikström, J. (2018). Cerebral osmolytes and plasma osmolality in pregnancy and preeclampsia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. American Journal of Hypertension, 31(7), 847-853
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebral osmolytes and plasma osmolality in pregnancy and preeclampsia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 847-853Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cerebral complications contribute substantially to mortality in preeclampsia. Pregnancy calls for extensive maternal adaptations, some associated with increased propensity for seizures, but the pathophysiology behind the eclamptic seizures is not fully understood. Plasma osmolality and sodium levels are lowered in pregnancy. This could result in extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes, including the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, but this remains to be determined. The hypothesis of this study was that cerebral levels of organic osmolytes are decreased during pregnancy, and that this decrease is even more pronounced in women with preeclampsia.

Method: We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare levels of cerebral organic osmolytes, in women with preeclampsia (n=30), normal pregnancy (n=32) and non-pregnant controls (n=16). Cerebral levels organic osmolytes were further correlated to plasma osmolality, and plasma levels of glutamate and sodium.

Results: Compared to non-pregnant women, women with normal pregnancy and preeclampsia had lower levels of the cerebral osmolytes myo-inositol, choline and creatine (p=0.001 or less), and all these metabolites correlated with each other (p<0.05). Women with normal pregnancies and preeclampsia had similar levels of osmolytes, except for glutamate, which was significantly lower in preeclampsia. Cerebral and plasma glutamate levels were negatively correlated with each other (p<0.008), and cerebral myo-inositol, choline and creatine levels were all positively correlated with both plasma osmolality and sodium levels (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Our results indicate that pregnancy is associated with extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes. This includes the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which may be involved in the pathophysiology of seizures in preeclampsia.

Keywords
Preeclampsia, eclampsia, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, cerebral osmolytes, glutamate
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341642 (URN)10.1093/ajh/hpy019 (DOI)000435458800015 ()29415199 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M. (2018). Preeclampsia and the Brain: Epidemiological and Magnetic Resonance Studies. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preeclampsia and the Brain: Epidemiological and Magnetic Resonance Studies
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Preeclampsia is a pregnancy specific syndrome that causes substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. One major contributor to maternal deaths is eclampsia, i.e. when seizures arise in the context of preeclampsia. The pathophysiology of eclampsia is still incompletely chartered and the long-term cerebral consequences of preeclampsia are also largely unknown.

This thesis consists of a register based cohort study (n=3232, study I), and a cross-sectional neuroimaging study of pregnant women with and without preeclampsia (n=78, studies II-IV).

In paper I, we compared the incidence of dementia and cardiovascular disease (CVD) between women ≥65 years with a self-reported history of hypertensive pregnancy, and women with a normotensive pregnancy. No difference was found regarding dementia, but an increased risk of CVD persisted among these elderly women.

In paper II, we used phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure cerebral magnesium levels (Mg2+). We found lower levels of Mg2+ in women with preeclampsia than in women with normal pregnancy and non-pregnant women. Further, which was novel, we showed that lower cerebral Mg2+levels correlated with visual disturbances. The findings are interesting, since magnesium sulfate is the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for eclampsia, but with a largely unknown mechanism of action.

In paper III, we measured cerebral organic osmolytes with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and found lower levels of osmolytes in pregnancy. Cerebral osmolytes were positively correlated with a decreased plasma osmolality, indicating that there is a joint biological mechanism. The only osmolyte that differed between women with preeclampsia and healthy pregnant women was glutamate. Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter, which also functions as an osmolyte. Thus, lower cerebral glutamate levels could have implications on the pathophysiology of seizures.

In paper IV, cerebral perfusion and edema were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging using intravoxel incoherent motion technique. A reduced perfusion fraction was found in a part of the basal ganglia in women with preeclampsia. No difference in edema was detected.

Our findings indicate Mg2+ metabolism, plasma hypoosmolality and possibly cerebral hypoperfusion to be involved in the pathophysiology of cerebral affection in preeclampsia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018. p. 65
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1432
Keywords
preeclampsia, eclampsia, seizure, MRI, MRS, IVIM, dementia, cardiovascular disease, magnesium, cerebral organic osmolytes, perfusion
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341999 (URN)978-91-513-0245-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-04-13, Gustavianum, auditorium minus, Akademigatan 3, Uppsala, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Weis, J., Bergman, L., Larsson, A., Wikström, A.-K. & Wikström, J. (2017). Cerebral Magnesium Levels in Preeclampsia; A Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study. American Journal of Hypertension, 30(7), 667-672
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebral Magnesium Levels in Preeclampsia; A Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 667-672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is used as a prophylaxis for eclamptic seizures. The exact mechanism of action is not fully established. We used phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to investigate if cerebral magnesium (Mg2+) levels differ between women with preeclampsia, normal pregnant, and nonpregnant women.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study comprised 28 women with preeclampsia, 30 women with normal pregnancies in corresponding gestational week (range: 23-41 weeks) and 11 nonpregnant healthy controls. All women underwent 31P-MRS from the parieto-occipital region of the brain and were interviewed about cerebral symptoms. Differences between groups were assessed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test. Correlations between Mg2+ levels and specific neurological symptoms were estimated with Spearman's rank test.

RESULTS: Mean maternal cerebral Mg2+ levels were lower in women with preeclampsia (0.12 mM ± 0.02) compared to normal pregnant controls (0.14 mM ± 0.03) (P = 0.04). Nonpregnant and normal pregnant women did not differ in Mg2+ levels. Among women with preeclampsia, lower Mg2+ levels correlated with presence of visual disturbances (P = 0.04). Plasma levels of Mg2+ did not differ between preeclampsia and normal pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS: Women with preeclampsia have reduced cerebral Mg2+ levels, which could explain the potent antiseizure prophylactic properties of MgSO4. Within the preeclampsia group, women with visual disturbances have lower levels of Mg2+ than those without such symptoms.

Keywords
31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, blood pressure, eclampsia, hypertension, magnesium, magnetic resonance, preeclampsia.
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319608 (URN)10.1093/ajh/hpx022 (DOI)000407115100009 ()28338765 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Yamamoto, S. & Nelander, M. (2016). Ectopic pregnancy in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: A case report. International journal of surgery case reports, 28, 152-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ectopic pregnancy in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: A case report
2016 (English)In: International journal of surgery case reports, ISSN 2210-2612, E-ISSN 2210-2612, Vol. 28, p. 152-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: We present a case report of ectopic pregnancy (EP) after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SKPTx). PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 33-year-old female status post SKPTx suddenly got abdominal pain in the lower level. She had high human chorionic Gonadotropin test. Ultrasonography revealed that there was no fetus in the uterus but a dilated right fallopian tube, which strongly suggested ectopic pregnancy. An emergency operation was performed and a dilated right side uterine tube was found with adhesions to her transplant. Salpingectomy was performed and no visible injury to the pancreas was found by the procedure. Pathological evaluation showed ectopic pregnant fetus, and no pancreas dysfunction was observed after the operation. DISCUSSION: This is the first case and operation report of EP after SKPTx. We should consider various causes of acute abdomen as well as several pathological condition in the transplanted pancreas such as pancreatitis, abscess, and thrombosis in vessels in the organ. Moreover, transplanted pancreas in abdomen is easily misrecognized as adipose tissue and there is high risk that the organ to get injured surgically. CONCLUSION: EP should be included in the different diagnosis in SKPTx female patients who get acute abdominal pain. It is highly desirable that transplant surgeon is included in the operation team for EP of these patients. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IJS Publishing Group Ltd.

Keywords
Ectopic pregnancy, Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation, Acute abdominal surgery, Surgical complication
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310695 (URN)10.1016/j.ijscr.2016.09.049 (DOI)000387796500041 ()27716570 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Cnattingius, S., Åkerud, H., Wikström, J., Pedersen, N. L. & Wikström, A.-K. (2016). Pregnancy hypertensive disease and risk of dementia and cardiovascular disease in women aged 65 years or older: a cohort study. BMJ Open, 6(1), Article ID e009880.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pregnancy hypertensive disease and risk of dementia and cardiovascular disease in women aged 65 years or older: a cohort study
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2016 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e009880Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The primary aim was to study pregnancy hypertensive disease and subsequent risk of dementia. The second aim was to study if the increased risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke after pregnancy hypertensive disease persist in an elderly population.

DESIGN: Cohort study.

SETTING: Sweden.

POPULATION OR SAMPLE: 3232 women 65 years or older (mean 71 years) at inclusion.

METHODS: Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to calculate risks of dementia, CVD and/or stroke for women exposed to pregnancy hypertensive disease. Exposure data were collected from an interview at inclusion during the years 1998-2002. Outcome data were collected from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register from the year of inclusion until the end of 2010. Age at inclusion was set as a time-dependent variable, and adjustments were made for body mass index, education and smoking.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dementia, CVD, stroke.

RESULTS: During the years of follow-up, 7.6% of the women exposed to pregnancy hypertensive disease received a diagnosis of dementia, compared with 7.4% among unexposed women (HR 1.19; 95% CI 0.79 to 1.73). The corresponding rates for CVD were 22.9% for exposed women and 19.0% for unexposed women (HR 1.29; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.61), and for stroke 13.4% for exposed women and 10.7% for unexposed women (HR 1.36; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.81).

CONCLUSIONS: There was no increased risk of dementia after self-reported pregnancy hypertensive disease in our cohort. We found that the previously reported increased risk of CVD and stroke after pregnancy hypertensive disease persists in an older population.

National Category
General Practice Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-278956 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009880 (DOI)000369993900137 ()26801467 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 259679Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-02-26 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Wikström, A.-K., Gunnarsdottir, J., Nelander, M., Simic, M., Stephansson, O. & Cnattingius, S. (2016). Prehypertension in Pregnancy and Risks of Small for Gestational Age Infant and Stillbirth. Hypertension, 67(3), 640-646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prehypertension in Pregnancy and Risks of Small for Gestational Age Infant and Stillbirth
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2016 (English)In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 640-646Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is not fully known whether maternal prehypertension is associated with increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes, and it is debated whether increases in blood pressure during pregnancy influence adverse fetal outcomes. We performed a population-based cohort study in nonhypertensive women with term (37 weeks) singleton births (n=157446). Using normotensive (diastolic blood pressure [DBP] <80 mmHg) women as reference, we calculated adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals between prehypertension (DBP 80-89 mmHg) at 36 gestational weeks (late pregnancy) and risks of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth or stillbirth. We further estimated whether an increase in DBP from early to late pregnancy affected these risks. We found that 11% of the study population had prehypertension in late pregnancy. Prehypertension was associated with increased risks of both SGA birth and stillbirth; adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.69 (1.51-1.90) and 1.70 (1.16-2.49), respectively. Risks of SGA birth in term pregnancy increased by 2.0% (95% confidence intervals 1.5-2.8) per each mmHg rise in DBP from early to late pregnancy, whereas risk of stillbirth was not affected by rise in DBP during pregnancy. We conclude that prehypertension in late pregnancy is associated with increased risks of SGA birth and stillbirth. Risk of SGA birth was also affected by rise in DBT during pregnancy. Our findings provide new insight to the relationship between maternal blood pressure and fetal well-being and suggest that impaired maternal perfusion of the placenta contribute to SGA birth and stillbirth.

Keywords
blood pressure, fetal death, fetal growth retardation, prehypertension, stillbirth
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280233 (URN)10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.115.06752 (DOI)000369755200028 ()26831196 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2016-03-09 Created: 2016-03-09 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Hannsberger, D., Sundström Poromaa, I., Bergman, L., Weis, J., Åkerud, H., . . . Wikström, A.-K.Assessment of cerebral perfusion and edema in preeclampsia with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of cerebral perfusion and edema in preeclampsia with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

Cerebral complications are the main reasons for morbidity and mortality in preeclampsia and eclampsia. Still we do not know if the pathophysiology entails hypo- or hyperperfusion of the brain, or how and when edema emerges, due to the difficulty to examine the cerebral circulation.

Material and methods

We have used a non-invasive diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, intravoxel incoherent motion, to study cerebral perfusion on the capillary level and cerebral edema in women with preeclampsia (n=30), normal pregnancy (n=32) and non-pregnant women (n=16). Estimates of cerebral blood volume, blood flow and edema were measured in five different regions. These points were chosen to represent blood supply areas of both the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries, and to include both white and grey matter.

Results

Except for the caudate nucleus, we did not detect any differences in cerebral perfusion measures on a group level. In the caudate nucleus we found lower cerebral blood volume  and lower blood flow in preeclampsia compared to both normal pregnancy (p=0.01 and p=0.03, respectively) and non-pregnant women (both p=0.02). No differences in edema were detected between study groups.

Conclusion

The cerebral perfusion measures were comparable between the study groups, except for a portion of the basal ganglia where hypoperfusion was detected in preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy and non-pregnant women. 

Keywords
Cerebral circulation, Edema, Eclampsia, Intravoxel incoherent motion, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Perfusion, Preeclampsia.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341646 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
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