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Ho, Hang Kei
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Ho, H. K. & Atkinson, R. (2018). Looking for big 'fry': The motives and methods of middle-class international property investors. Urban Studies, 55(9), 2040-2056
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Looking for big 'fry': The motives and methods of middle-class international property investors
2018 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 55, no 9, p. 2040-2056Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anxieties about the effects of international property investment in world cities like London have mainly focused on super-rich investors and corporate vehicles that have generated price inflation of assets and accelerated exclusion from an already expensive market. In fact, many international investors in the city's housing market are middle-class individuals, and focusing on Hong Kong as an emblematic example of such processes, we examine their motives and the products offered to them by important investment intermediaries. We find that an important rationale for these investments lies in local class-based uncertainties and existential anxieties concerning the future of Hong Kong itself. We focus on the cultural roots of these investor rationalities but also consider the role of investment intermediaries who have helped bolster confidence while shielding investors from the consequences of their aggregated market power – concerns in London over household displacement from foreign investment. We suggest that what may seem to be the predatory search to 'fry' property (炒樓), a Hongkonger colloquialism referring to the search for high performing investments, should also be understood as actions anchored in and generated by the habitus of the Hong Kong middle class whose lives have been moulded by historical geopolitical uncertainty and worries about its longer-term social positioning and security.

Keywords
anxiety, Hong Kong, housing market, housing tenure, London, property wealth
National Category
Economic Geography Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322141 (URN)10.1177/0042098017702826 (DOI)000436075600011 ()
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Ho, H. K. (2016). Hong Kong as a successful wine trading hub: Business practices, government policies and drinking cultures. In: : . Paper presented at The Worlds in a Wine Glass.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hong Kong as a successful wine trading hub: Business practices, government policies and drinking cultures
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

How do we make sense of Hong Kong's growing wine industry and drinking trend? In 2011 the wine industry was stunned when more than half of the global revenues of fine and rare wine trade were generated through auctions that took place in Hong Kong, overtaking New York to become the global wine auction hub. One might think that wine has long been a popular drink in Hong Kong but the wine drinking culture has only taken off since the withdrawal of wine tax in February 2008. Through the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data collected in Hong Kong, this paper explores how Hong Kong has successfully been transformed into a wine trading city from the perspective of wine businesses, government policies and consumers. As part of an ongoing piece of research, this paper will contribute to the growing body of literature on the globalisation of wine in the South East Asian context.

Keywords
Hong Kong, wine industry
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293419 (URN)
Conference
The Worlds in a Wine Glass
Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2016-05-12
Atkinson, R., Burrows, R., Glucksberg, L., Ho, H. K., Knowles, C., Rhodes, D. & Webber, R. (2016). International Capital Flows into London Property. Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Capital Flows into London Property
Show others...
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute: , 2016
Series
Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI) Global Political Economy Brief No. 2
Keywords
London, property market, property investment, capital, super-rich, Hong Kong
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Sociology Political Science Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280527 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2017-02-23
Ho, H. K. & Atkinson, R. (2016). Looking for big fry: middle-class international property investment in an uncertain world. In: : . Paper presented at Housing Wealth and Welfare, University of Amsterdam.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Looking for big fry: middle-class international property investment in an uncertain world
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

What is the geography and impact of investment by international middle-class investors? The global financial crisis has, if anything, propelled investments in key urban centres like London, with wealthy international individuals purchasing residential properties in prime locations as a secure way to park their assets. While much of the popular debate on the London housing market focuses on the inward capital from Russia and Europe, it has neglected the significant investment flow from Hong Kong. The city offers insight into the motivations and strategies of international investors, but also evidence of a capital switch by mid to lower tier investors who now view London as expensive and who are being re-directed by investment intermediaries highlighting the value of investing in the north of England. Unlike the infamous super-rich investors in London's super prime markets these investors engage in off-plan purchases in mid-markets. In this article we characterise these flows in three distinct waves between the early 1990s and 2014, namely the pre-1997 handover migration investment wave that took place between the early 1990s and 1997; the frying London wave that appeared after the global financial crisis in 2007, and an expanded, post-metropolitan wave. This latter wave is of particular interest because it suggests a greater embedding of the infrastructure of intermediaries in UK social conditions, thus opening a new cognitive geography of investment but which is also shaped by the sense that London's gains have now largely been exhausted.

Keywords
Hong Kong, London, residential property investment, super-rich, middle class, financial crisis
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-294849 (URN)
Conference
Housing Wealth and Welfare, University of Amsterdam
Available from: 2016-05-27 Created: 2016-05-27 Last updated: 2016-05-27
Ho, H. K. (2015). Christine Yano, Pink Globalization: Hello Kitty’s Trek across the Pacific [Review]. Journal of Consumer Culture, 15, 425-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Christine Yano, Pink Globalization: Hello Kitty’s Trek across the Pacific
2015 (English)In: Journal of Consumer Culture, ISSN 1469-5405, Vol. 15, p. 425-427Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Hello Kitty, Globalization, Pink Globalization
National Category
Sociology Cultural Studies Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280526 (URN)10.1177/1469540515574217 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Ho, H. K. (2015). Hong Kong. In: Scott C. Martin (Ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of Alcohol: Social, Cultural, and Historical Perspectives: (pp. 701-703). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hong Kong
2015 (English)In: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Alcohol: Social, Cultural, and Historical Perspectives / [ed] Scott C. Martin, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2015, p. 701-703Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
Hong Kong, alcohol consumption, wine industry, drinking places, drinking culture, genetics, social perception
National Category
Cultural Studies Economics and Business Globalisation Studies Social and Economic Geography Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280528 (URN)10.4135/9781483331096.n258 (DOI)9781483325255 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Ho, H. K. (2015). Hong Kong at a crossroad: Exploring its changing relationship with China and the West through foreign real estate investment, education and consumption practice. In: : . Paper presented at China in the World and the World in China, Nordic Association for China Studies (NACS) 12th biennial conference, Uppsala University, June 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hong Kong at a crossroad: Exploring its changing relationship with China and the West through foreign real estate investment, education and consumption practice
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

It has been eighteen years since Hong Kong's sovereignty was transferred from Britain to back to mainland China. Although Hong Kong was promised that its autonomy and way of life would remain unchanged for fifty years until 2047, the ongoing political uncertainty and the influx of the underprivileged as well as super-rich mainland Chinese have impacted Hongkongers' everyday life. Some Hongkongers have welcomed the wealth and opportunities that the mainland Chinese bring to the Special Administrative Region, whilst others have been less approving of their lack of respect for Hong Kong's culture and society. Moreover, the recent Umbrella Movement that took place in September 2014 has further challenged the identity of Hong Kong citizens in which they are even more concerned, confused and consternated about their future.

This working paper examines the ways that Hongkongers deal with internal and external uncertainties through the way they invest in foreign real estates, decide on their children's education and everyday consumption practices.

This research draws on my previous doctoral work on the geographies of consumption in Hong Kong and my current postdoctoral research on the way that Hong Kong investors purchase residential properties in the UK and other parts of the world. This paper provides a snapshot of 2015's Hong Kong and how Hongkongers confront the conflicting relationship between the consumption of western values and their traditional Chinese identity.

Keywords
Hong Kong, China, one country two systems, real estate investment, education, consumption practice, identity
National Category
Human Geography Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Social Sciences Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280519 (URN)
Conference
China in the World and the World in China, Nordic Association for China Studies (NACS) 12th biennial conference, Uppsala University, June 2015.
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2016-03-19
Ho, H. K. & Atkinson, R. (2015). Hong Kong-based property buyers look to northern England as London overheats. The Conversation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hong Kong-based property buyers look to northern England as London overheats
2015 (English)In: The ConversationArticle in journal (Other academic) Published
Keywords
Hong Kong, England, London, property investment, off-plan property, affordable housing
National Category
Economics and Business Political Science Social and Economic Geography Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280529 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2016-03-23
Ho, H. K. & Aggeklint, E. (2015). Introducing M+ as capital for a Hong Kong specific cultural identity. In: : . Paper presented at The Fourth European Colloquium on Culture, Creativity and Economy, Florence, Italy, October, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing M+ as capital for a Hong Kong specific cultural identity
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the last decade the Hong Kong government has shown an interest in promoting large scale cultural development projects including Art Basel Hong Kong, the West Kowloon Cultural District (WKCD) as well as M+ The Museum of Arts and Visual Culture, all presenting Hong Kong as a cultural hub. The development of those projects can be seen as a way for the city to diversify its economy through creative industries (CI) and urban entrepreneurship (Raco and Gilliam, 2012), making the place more appealing for international workers and global tourism. However, ongoing grassroots political movements such as the 2014 Umbrella Movement suggest that the Beijing government is keen to intervene with Hong Kong's affairs. As a result, its cultural identity is being challenged. In this paper we argue that the study of the yet conceptual M+ museum contribute with accruing capital of cultural identity when compared to likewise huge museum projects in mainland China. We will further argue that the Hong Kong museum will represent an original that other museums in the world may wish to copy.

Keywords
Hong Kong, mainland China, M+, West Kowloon Cultural District, WKCD, spaces, museum, conceptual, original, cultural identity
National Category
Arts Sociology Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280579 (URN)
Conference
The Fourth European Colloquium on Culture, Creativity and Economy, Florence, Italy, October, 2015.
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2016-03-19
Ho, H. K. (2015). Mer rött vin, tack!: Den ökande vinkulturen och vinindustrin i Hongkong. Kinarapport (4), 40-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mer rött vin, tack!: Den ökande vinkulturen och vinindustrin i Hongkong
2015 (Swedish)In: Kinarapport, ISSN 0345-5807, no 4, p. 40-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Keywords
Hong Kong, wine industry, globalisation, alcohol consumption
National Category
Economics Globalisation Studies Social and Economic Geography Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280525 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
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