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Spagopoulou, Foteini
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Spagopoulou, F. (2018). Condition-dependence in life history evolution. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Condition-dependence in life history evolution
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Ageing is the progressive physiological deterioration that appears with increasing age and eventually leads to a decline in survival and reproduction. This physiological process is omnipresent across the tree of life, but the expected trajectory can widely vary between and within species. Classic theories predict that the evolution of senescence is strongly influenced by the level of extrinsic mortality. Furthermore, variation in early-life developmental environments can shape individual condition and thus lead to alternative life-history strategies. The interplay between early-life environment and individual condition might therefore predict the trajectory of ageing and is of importance when studying life history evolution. In this thesis, I focus on condition dependent life-history strategies and how this can translate in differential ageing patterns. Moreover, I specifically investigate the influence of early-life environment on key life history traits (i.e. survival and reproduction) and how this might eventually carry-over to future generations via nongenetic inheritance. First, I used an experimental approach involving lab populations of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei to show that males, but not females, pay the cost for the evolution of increased lifespan (Paper I). Second, I used an empirical dataset based on 25 years of observations, to investigate the long-term effects of early-life environment on reproduction and survival (Paper II). Reproductive success of low-condition females in natural populations of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) peaks later in life, when high-condition females are already in steep reproductive decline and suffer from high mortality rates. Third, I used the neriid fly Telostylinus angusticollis in an experimental environment, to test whether condition-dependent investment in secondary sexual traits affects the life-history strategies of males (Paper III). High-condition males developed and aged faster than low-condition males, but interaction with rival males did not affect male reproductive ageing. Finally, continuing the T. angusticollis experiment, I also found that parental diet interacts with parental sex and offspring sex, ultimately affecting offspring life-histories. Parental effects can thus play an important role in shaping between-individual variation in reproductive and actuarial senescence (Paper IV). Overall, in this thesis I have explored the interaction between environment, condition and ageing in both experimental and natural settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018. p. 73
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1662
Keywords
Ageing, senescence, nongenetic inheritance, sex differences, condition-dependence, life history, trade-off, Ficedula albicollis, Caenorhabditis remanei, Telostylinus angusticollis
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347848 (URN)978-91-513-0314-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-05-25, Zootissalen, Villavägen 9, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-10-08
Spagopoulou, F. & Blom, M. P. K. (2018). Digest: Life history evolution in Darwin's dream ponds. Evolution, 72(5), 1186-1188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digest: Life history evolution in Darwin's dream ponds
2018 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 1186-1188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Can variation in sex‐specific parental investment lead to sexual dimorphism in immune response? Keller et al. (2018) measured immune cell parameters, expression of candidate genes and composition of buccal microbiota in mouthbrooding cichlid species from Lake Tanganyika that show either maternal or biparental care. They found that maternal mouthbrooding species have increased sexual dimorphism in immune parameters, while biparental mouthbrooders exhibit an upregulated adaptive immune response, suggesting resource allocation shifts between parental investment and the immune system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Organismal Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347835 (URN)10.1111/evo.13473 (DOI)000431989400015 ()29603725 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-08 Created: 2018-04-08 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
Lind, M. I. & Spagopoulou, F. (2018). Evolutionary consequences of epigenetic inheritance. Heredity, 121(3), 205-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolutionary consequences of epigenetic inheritance
2018 (English)In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, E-ISSN 1365-2540, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 205-209Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365673 (URN)10.1038/s41437-018-0113-y (DOI)000441073100001 ()29976958 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-16 Created: 2018-11-16 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Svensson, E. I., Goedert, D., Gomez-Llano, M. A., Spagopoulou, F., Nava-Bolanos, A. & Booksmythe, I. (2018). Sex differences in local adaptation: what can we learn from reciprocal transplant experiments?. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 373(1757), Article ID 20170420.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex differences in local adaptation: what can we learn from reciprocal transplant experiments?
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2018 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 373, no 1757, article id 20170420Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Local adaptation is of fundamental interest to evolutionary biologists. Traditionally, local adaptation has been studied using reciprocal transplant experiments to quantify fitness differences between residents and immigrants in pairwise transplants between study populations. Previous studies have detected local adaptation in some cases, but others have shown lack of adaptation or even maladaptation. Recently, the importance of different fitness components, such as survival and fecundity, to local adaptation have been emphasized. Here, we address another neglected aspect in studies of local adaptation: sex differences. Given the ubiquity of sexual dimorphism in life histories and phenotypic traits, this neglect is surprising, but may be partly explained by differences in research traditions and terminology in the fields of local adaptation and sexual selection. Studies that investigate differences in mating success between resident and immigrants across populations tend to be framed in terms of reproductive and behavioural isolation, rather than local adaptation. We briefly review the published literature that bridges these areas and suggest that reciprocal transplant experiments could benefit from quantifying both male and female fitness components. Such a more integrative research approach could clarify the role of sex differences in the evolution of local adaptations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC, 2018
Keywords
female demographic dominance, gene flow, intersexual genetic correlation, local adaptation, reciprocal transplant experiments, sexual dimorphism
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364725 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2017.0420 (DOI)000443010000005 ()30150219 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-03356Australian Research Council, DE170101193
Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Hooper, A. K., Spagopoulou, F., Wylde, Z., Maklakov, A. A. & Bonduriansky, R. (2017). Ontogenetic timing as a condition-dependent life history trait: High-condition males develop quickly, peak early, and age fast. Evolution, 71(3), 671-685
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ontogenetic timing as a condition-dependent life history trait: High-condition males develop quickly, peak early, and age fast
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2017 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 671-685Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Within-population variation in ageing remains poorly understood. In males, condition-dependent investment in secondary sexual traits may incur costs that limit ability to invest in somatic maintenance. Moreover, males often express morphological and behavioral secondary sexual traits simultaneously, but the relative effects on ageing of investment in these traits remain unclear. We investigated the condition dependence of male life history in the neriid fly Telostylinus angusticollis. Using a fully factorial design, we manipulated male early-life condition by varying nutrient content of the larval diet and, subsequently, manipulated opportunity for adult males to interact with rival males. We found that high-condition males developed more quickly and reached their reproductive peak earlier in life, but also experienced faster reproductive ageing and died sooner than low-condition males. By contrast, interactions with rival males reduced male lifespan but did not affect male reproductive ageing. High-condition in early life is therefore associated with rapid ageing in T. angusticollis males, even in the absence of damaging male-male interactions. Our results show that abundant resources during the juvenile phase are used to expedite growth and development and enhance early-life reproductive performance at the expense of late-life performance and survival, demonstrating a clear link between male condition and ageing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
Condition dependence, costs of secondary sexual traits, life history, reproductive ageing, senescence, sexual selection
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320842 (URN)10.1111/evo.13172 (DOI)000396039000012 ()28067402 (PubMedID)
Funder
Australian Research CouncilEU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Chen, H.-Y. -., Spagopoulou, F. & Maklakov, A. A. (2016). Evolution of male age-specific reproduction under differential risks and causes of death: males pay the cost of high female fitness. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 29(4), 848-856
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of male age-specific reproduction under differential risks and causes of death: males pay the cost of high female fitness
2016 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 848-856Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Classic theories of ageing evolution predict that increased extrinsic mortality due to an environmental hazard selects for increased early reproduction, rapid ageing and short intrinsic lifespan. Conversely, emerging theory maintains that when ageing increases susceptibility to an environmental hazard, increased mortality due to this hazard can select against ageing in physiological condition and prolong intrinsic lifespan. However, evolution of slow ageing under high-condition-dependent mortality is expected to result from reallocation of resources to different traits and such reallocation may be hampered by sex-specific trade-offs. Because same life-history trait values often have different fitness consequences in males and females, sexually antagonistic selection can preserve genetic variance for lifespan and ageing. We previously showed that increased condition-dependent mortality caused by heat shock leads to evolution of long-life, decelerated late-life mortality in both sexes and increased female fecundity in the nematode, Caenorhabditis remanei. Here, we used these cryopreserved lines to show that males evolving under heat shock suffered from reduced early-life and net reproduction, while mortality rate had no effect. Our results suggest that heat-shock resistance and associated long-life trade-off with male, but not female, reproduction and therefore sexually antagonistic selection contributes to maintenance of genetic variation for lifespan and fitness in this population.

Keywords
heat shock, intralocus sexual conflict, life-history trade-off, senescence, sex-specific pleiotropy
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-295550 (URN)10.1111/jeb.12833 (DOI)000373929000015 ()26801472 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-08 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
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