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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Anderson, K., Buck, H. J., Fuhr, L., Geden, O., Peters, G. P. & Tamme, E. (2023). Controversies of carbon dioxide removal. Nature Reviews Earth & Environment, 4(12), 808-814
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Controversies of carbon dioxide removal
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2023 (English)In: Nature Reviews Earth & Environment, E-ISSN 2662-138X, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 808-814Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Various methods of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) are being pursued in response to the climate crisis, but they are mostly not proven at scale. Climate experts are divided over whether CDR is a necessary requirement or a dangerous distraction from limiting emissions. In this Viewpoint, six experts offer their views on the CDR debate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-531367 (URN)10.1038/s43017-023-00493-y (DOI)001102823800001 ()
Funder
EU, Horizon Europe, 101056306
Available from: 2024-06-13 Created: 2024-06-13 Last updated: 2024-06-13Bibliographically approved
Kuriakose, J., Anderson, K., Darko, D., Obuobie, E., Larkin, A. & Addo, S. (2022). Implications of large hydro dams for decarbonising Ghana's energy consistent with Paris climate objectives. Energy for Sustainable Development, 71, 433-446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implications of large hydro dams for decarbonising Ghana's energy consistent with Paris climate objectives
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2022 (English)In: Energy for Sustainable Development, ISSN 0973-0826, E-ISSN 2352-4669, Vol. 71, p. 433-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydropower is a renewable source of electricity generation that is a common feature of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC), especially in developing countries. However, far from benign, research shows that signifi-cant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions emanate from shallow reservoirs when they are sited in the tropics. Ghana provides a case study for exploring the implications of hydro reservoir emissions within a future energy system consistent with the Paris climate objectives. Being a fast-developing country, Ghana needs to generate significant amounts of low-carbon electricity to meet growing demand over the coming 30 years. Analysis of existing Ghanaian dams (Akosombo, Kpong and Bui) and the forthcoming Pwalugu dam suggests that their average emis-sions intensities (gCO2/kWh) are similar to those of coal-fired power stations during the first 30 years of their op-erating lifetime. The case study demonstrates that cumulative (post-2020) carbon dioxide emissions from the planned and identified hydro resources will consume 40 % of Ghana's Paris-compliant carbon budget, yet provide just under 1 % of its future energy demand (under Paris-compliant scenarios). The analysis suggests that new hy-dropower in the tropics can significantly reduce the emission space available for other sectors such as transport and industry when faced with a highly restricted emissions budget. In conclusion, for Ghana specifically, rather than constructing more dams, energy efficiency and diversifying renewable energy supply options, including floating solar power, would deliver an energy transition for Ghana that is much more closely aligned with the Paris goals. (c) 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of International Energy Initiative. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierELSEVIER, 2022
Keywords
Paris Agreement, Reservoir emissions, Hydropower, Carbon budget, Renewable energy, Energy scenarios
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-492121 (URN)10.1016/j.esd.2022.10.011 (DOI)000891620000004 ()
Available from: 2023-01-31 Created: 2023-01-31 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Stoddard, I., Anderson, K., Capstick, S., Carton, W., Depledge, J., Facer, K., . . . Williams, M. (2021). Three Decades of Climate Mitigation: Why Haven't We Bent the Global Emissions Curve?. Annual Review Environment and Resources, 46(1), 653-689
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three Decades of Climate Mitigation: Why Haven't We Bent the Global Emissions Curve?
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2021 (English)In: Annual Review Environment and Resources, ISSN 1543-5938, E-ISSN 1545-2050, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 653-689Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite three decades of political efforts and a wealth of research on the causes and catastrophic impacts of climate change, global carbon dioxide emissions have continued to rise and are 60% higher today than they were in 1990. Exploring this rise through nine thematic lenses—covering issues of climate governance, the fossil fuel industry, geopolitics, economics, mitigation modeling, energy systems, inequity, lifestyles, and social imaginaries—draws out multifaceted reasons for our collective failure to bend the global emissions curve. However, a common thread that emerges across the reviewed literature is the central role of power, manifest in many forms, from a dogmatic political-economic hegemony and influential vested interests to narrow techno-economic mindsets and ideologies of control. Synthesizing the various impediments to mitigation reveals how delivering on the commitments enshrined in the Paris Agreement now requires an urgent and unprecedented transformation away from today's carbon- and energy-intensive development paradigm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ANNUAL REVIEWSAnnual Reviews, 2021
Keywords
General Environmental Science
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-456881 (URN)10.1146/annurev-environ-012220-011104 (DOI)000713670600024 ()
Available from: 2021-10-23 Created: 2021-10-23 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Anderson, K., Broderick, J. & Stoddard, I. (2020). A factor of two: how the mitigation plans of ‘climate progressive nations’ fall far short of Paris-compliant pathways. Climate Policy, 20(10), 1290-1304
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A factor of two: how the mitigation plans of ‘climate progressive nations’ fall far short of Paris-compliant pathways
2020 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1290-1304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Paris Agreement establishes an international covenant to reduce emissions in line with holding the increase in temperature to 'well below 2 degrees C horizontal ellipsis and to pursue horizontal ellipsis 1.5 degrees C.' Global modelling studies have repeatedly concluded that such commitments can be delivered through technocratic adjustments to contemporary society, principally price mechanisms driving technical change. However, as emissions have continued to rise, so these models have come to increasingly rely on the extensive deployment of highly speculative negative emissions technologies (NETs). Moreover, in determining the mitigation challenges for industrialized nations, scant regard is paid to the language and spirit of equity enshrined in the Paris Agreement. If, instead, the mitigation agenda of 'developed country Parties' is determined without reliance on planetary scale NETs and with genuine regard for equity and 'common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities', the necessary rates of mitigation increase markedly. This is evident even when considering the UK and Sweden, two nations at the forefront of developing 'progressive' climate change legislation and with clear emissions pathways and/or quantitative carbon budgets. In both cases, the carbon budgets underpinning mitigation policy are halved, the immediate mitigation rate is increased to over 10% per annum, and the time to deliver a fully decarbonized energy system is brought forward to 2035-40. Such a challenging mitigation agenda implies profound changes to many facets of industrialized economies. This conclusion is not drawn from political ideology, but rather is a direct consequence of the international community's obligations under the Paris Agreement and the small and rapidly dwindling global carbon budget. Key Policy Insights Without a belief in the successful deployment of planetary scale negative emissions technologies, double-digit annual mitigation rates are required of developed countries, from 2020, if they are to align their policies with the Paris Agreement's temperature commitments and principles of equity. Paris-compliant carbon budgets for developed countries imply full decarbonization of energy by 2035-40, necessitating a scale of change in physical infrastructure reminiscent of the post-Second World War Marshall Plan. This brings issues of values, measures of prosperity and socio-economic inequality to the fore. The stringency of Paris-compliant pathways severely limits the opportunity for inter-sectoral emissions trading. Consequently aviation, as with all sectors, will need to identify policies to reduce emissions to zero, directly or through the use of zero carbon fuels. The UK and Swedish governments' emissions pathways imply a carbon budget of at least a factor of two greater than their fair contribution to delivering on the Paris Agreement's 1.5-2 degrees C commitment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2020
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400707 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2020.1728209 (DOI)000541291400001 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 46532-1
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2023-06-15Bibliographically approved
Hagedorn, G., Kalmus, P., Mann, M., Vicca, S., Van den Berge, J., van Ypersele, J.-P., . . . Hayhoe, K. (2019). Concerns of young protesters are justified [Letter to the editor]. Science, 364(6436), 139-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concerns of young protesters are justified
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2019 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 364, no 6436, p. 139-140Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383049 (URN)10.1126/science.aax3807 (DOI)000464620000030 ()30975882 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Anderson, K. (2019). Wrong tool for the job: Debating the bedrock of climate-change mitigation scenarios. Nature, 573(7774), 348-348
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wrong tool for the job: Debating the bedrock of climate-change mitigation scenarios
2019 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 573, no 7774, p. 348-348Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Computer Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395748 (URN)10.1038/d41586-019-02744-9 (DOI)000486647800031 ()31527780 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-24 Created: 2019-10-24 Last updated: 2019-10-24Bibliographically approved
Anderson, K., Schrage, J., Stoddard, I., Tuckey, A. & Wetterstedt, M. (2018). A Guide for a Fair Implementation of the Paris Agreement within Swedish Municipalities and Regional Governments: Part II of the Carbon Budget Reports Submitted to Swedish Local Governing Bodies in the 2018 Project "Koldioxidbudgetar 2020-2040". Uppsal: Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Guide for a Fair Implementation of the Paris Agreement within Swedish Municipalities and Regional Governments: Part II of the Carbon Budget Reports Submitted to Swedish Local Governing Bodies in the 2018 Project "Koldioxidbudgetar 2020-2040"
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2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Since 2015, Uppsala University has hosted the Zennström Visiting Professorship in Climate Change Leadership, part of a 10-year series of visiting professorships (2015-2025) funded by Zennström Philanthropies. The ambition of the initiative is to tackle some of the largest challenges climate change poses to humanity, by developing new solutions and enabling transformational change at the intersection of science, politics and innovation. Kevin Anderson, Professor of Energy and Climate Change at the University of Manchester and Deputy Director at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research was the second holder of this professorship, taking up the positionin August 2016. He has pioneered research on carbon budgets and pathways to acceptable mitigation levels with a focus on Sweden and the UK (see Anderson et al., 2017 and Kuriakose et al., 2018). In 2017, Järfälla municipality contacted the Climate Change Leadership (CCL) Node at Uppsala University seeking a carbon budget for their municipality which was published later that year (Anderson et al., 2017). When this report was completed, more municipalities contacted CCL to request similar carbon budget calculations. The great interest resulted in the project, “Koldioxidbudgetar 2020-2040” (Carbon budgets 2020-2040) starting in2018 in collaboration with Ramboll. This ongoing project is characterised by a high level of collaboration and knowledge sharing between municipalities (kommuner), regional governments (län) and the Climate Change Leadership Node in order to produce reports that meet the needs and expectations of participating governing bodies. This report is part II of the project. Part I consists of individual carbon budget reports submitted to participating Swedish municipalities and regional governments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsal: Uppsala universitet, 2018. p. 47
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401039 (URN)
Available from: 2020-01-04 Created: 2020-01-04 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Anderson, K., Schrage, J., Stoddard, I., Tuckey, A. & Wetterstedt, M. (2018). Koldioxidbudget 2020-2040: Del 1. Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Koldioxidbudget 2020-2040: Del 1
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2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2018
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401038 (URN)
Available from: 2020-01-04 Created: 2020-01-04 Last updated: 2023-10-26
Larkin, A., Kuriakose, J., Sharmina, M. & Anderson, K. (2018). What if negative emission technologies fail at scale?: Implications of the Paris Agreement for big emitting nations. Climate Policy, 18(6), 690-714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What if negative emission technologies fail at scale?: Implications of the Paris Agreement for big emitting nations
2018 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 690-714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A cumulative emissions approach is increasingly used to inform mitigation policy. However, there are different interpretations of what 2 degrees C' implies. Here it is argued that cost-optimization models, commonly used to inform policy, typically underplay the urgency of 2 degrees C mitigation. The alignment within many scenarios of optimistic assumptions on negative emissions technologies (NETs), with implausibly early peak emission dates and incremental short-term mitigation, delivers outcomes commensurate with 2 degrees C commitments. In contrast, considering equity and socio-technical barriers to change, suggests a more challenging short-term agenda. To understand these different interpretations, short-term CO2 trends of the largest CO2 emitters, are assessed in relation to a constrained CO2 budget, coupled with a what if' assumption that negative emissions technologies fail at scale. The outcomes raise profound questions around high-level framings of mitigation policy. The article concludes that applying even weak equity criteria, challenges the feasibility of maintaining a 50% chance of avoiding 2 degrees C without urgent mitigation efforts in the short-term. This highlights a need for greater engagement with: (1) the equity dimension of the Paris Agreement, (2) the sensitivity of constrained carbon budgets to short-term trends and (3) the climate risks for society posed by an almost ubiquitous inclusion of NETs within 2 degrees C scenarios.POLICY RELEVANCESince the Paris meeting, there is increased awareness that most policy solutions' commensurate with 2 degrees C include widespread deployment of negative emissions technologies (NETs). Yet much less is understood about that option's feasibility, compared with near-term efforts to curb energy demand. Moreover, the many different ways in which key information is synthesized for policy makers, clouds the ability of policy makers to make informed decisions. This article presents an alternative approach to consider what the Paris Agreement implies, if NETs are unable to deliver more carbon sinks than sources. It illustrates the scale of the climate challenge for policy makers, particularly if the Agreement's aim to address equity' is accounted for. Here it is argued that much more attention needs to be paid to what CO2 reductions can be achieved in the short-term, rather than taking a risk that could render the Paris Agreement's policy goals unachievable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Big emitters, carbon budgets, CO2, emission pathways, emission scenarios, short-term trends
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357548 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2017.1346498 (DOI)000433124200002 ()
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2019-01-18Bibliographically approved
Anderson, K., Stoddard, I. & Schrage, J. (2017). Carbon budget and pathways to a fossil-free future in Järfälla Municipality. Uppsala: Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon budget and pathways to a fossil-free future in Järfälla Municipality
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In 2015, the global community committed to hold global average temperature increase to “well below 2°C above preindustrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C.”. While nations showed clear commitment to the Paris Agreement’s temperature goals, what would those pledges entail for cities desiring to make a fair contribution to addressing climate change? This report is the result of research that the Centre for Sustainable Development (CEMUS) at Uppsala University and SLU conducted on behalf of Järfälla Municipality. The report describes the calculation of a carbon budget for Sweden, followed by a calculation of Järfälla Municipality's carbon budget. The report concludes with a chapter describing emissions reductions pathways (and possible corresponding measures) for Järfälla Municipality if they are to make their fair contribution to the Paris Agreement and pave the way for the transition to a fossil-free future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2017. p. 38
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401034 (URN)
Available from: 2020-01-04 Created: 2020-01-04 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0718-7544

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