Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Kariuki, R. W., Capitani, C., Munishi, L. K., Shoemaker, A., Mustaphi, C. C., William, N., . . . Marchant, R. (2022). Serengeti's futures: Exploring land use and land cover change scenarios to craft pathways for meeting conservation and development goals. Frontiers in Conservation Science, 3, Article ID 920143.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serengeti's futures: Exploring land use and land cover change scenarios to craft pathways for meeting conservation and development goals
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Conservation Science, E-ISSN 2673-611X, Vol. 3, article id 920143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rapid land use transformations and increased climatic uncertainties challenge potential sustainable development pathways for communities and wildlife in regions with strong economic reliance on natural resources. In response to the complex causes and consequences of land use change, participatory scenario development approaches have emerged as key tools for analyzing drivers of change to help chart the future of socio-ecological systems. We assess stakeholder perspectives of land use and land cover change (LULCC) and integrate co-produced scenarios of future land cover change with spatial modeling to evaluate how future LULCC in the wider Serengeti ecosystem might align or diverge with the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals and the African Union's Agenda 2063. Across the wider Serengeti ecosystem, population growth, infrastructural development, agricultural economy, and political will in support of climate change management strategies were perceived to be the key drivers of future LULCC. Under eight scenarios, declines in forest area as a proportion of total land area ranged from 0.1% to 4% in 2030 and from 0.1% to 6% in 2063, with the preservation of forest cover linked to the level of protection provided. Futures with well-demarcated protected areas, sound land use plans, and stable governance were highly desired. In contrast, futures with severe climate change impacts and encroached and degazetted protected areas were considered undesirable. Insights gained from our study are important for guiding pathways toward achieving sustainability goals while recognizing societies' relationship with nature. The results highlight the usefulness of multi-stakeholder engagement, perspective sharing, and consensus building toward shared socio-ecological goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media SA, 2022
Keywords
agenda-2063, climate variability, knowledge co-production, savannas, social-ecological interactions, SDGs
National Category
Physical Geography Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-507001 (URN)10.3389/fcosc.2022.920143 (DOI)001004307900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas, 2016-06355
Available from: 2023-07-03 Created: 2023-07-03 Last updated: 2023-07-03Bibliographically approved
Courtney Mustaphi, C. J., Kinyanjui, R., Shoemaker, A., Mumbi, C., Muiruri, V., Marchant, L., . . . Marchant, R. (2021). A 3000-year record of vegetation changes and fire at a high-elevation wetland on Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Quaternary Research, 99, 34-62, Article ID PII S0033589420000769.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 3000-year record of vegetation changes and fire at a high-elevation wetland on Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Quaternary Research, ISSN 0033-5894, E-ISSN 1096-0287, Vol. 99, p. 34-62, article id PII S0033589420000769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Kilimanjaro is experiencing the consequences of climate change and multiple land-use pressures. Few paleoenvironmental and archeological records exist to examine historical patterns of late Holocene ecosystem changes on Kilimanjaro. Here we present pollen, phytolith, and charcoal (>125 mu m) data from a palustrine sediment core that provide a 3000-year radiocarbon-dated record collected from a wetland near the headwaters of the Maua watershed in the alpine and ericaceous vegetation zones. From 3000 to 800 cal yr BP, the pollen, phytolith, and charcoal records show subtle variability in ericaceous and montane forest assemblages with apparent multicentennial secular variability and a long-term pattern of increasing Poaceae and charcoal. From 800 to 600 cal yr BP, montane forest taxa varied rapidly, Cyperaceae abundances increased, and charcoal remained distinctly low. From 600 yr cal BP to the present, woody taxa decreased, and ericaceous taxa and Poaceae dominated, with a conspicuously increased charcoal influx. Uphill wetland ecosystems are crucial for ecological and socioeconomic resilience on and surrounding the mountain. The results were synthesized with the existing paleoenvironmental and archaeological data to explore the high spatiotemporal complexity of Kilimanjaro and to understand historical human-environment interactions. These paleoenvironmental records create a long-term context for current climate, biodiversity, and land-use changes on and around Kilimanjaro.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University PressCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2021
Keywords
Africa, Archaeology, Ericaceae, Mires, Mountain, Palynology, Palustrine
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-435977 (URN)10.1017/qua.2020.76 (DOI)000610966600003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-06355
Available from: 2021-06-30 Created: 2021-06-30 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Kariuki, R. W., Munishi, L. K., Courtney-Mustaphi, C. J., Capitani, C., Shoemaker, A., Lane, P. J. & Marchant, R. (2021). Integrating stakeholders' perspectives and spatial modelling to develop scenarios of future land use and land cover change in northern Tanzania. PLOS ONE, 16(2), Article ID e0245516.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating stakeholders' perspectives and spatial modelling to develop scenarios of future land use and land cover change in northern Tanzania
Show others...
2021 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 2, article id e0245516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rapid rates of land use and land cover change (LULCC) in eastern Africa and limited instances of genuinely equal partnerships involving scientists, communities and decision makers challenge the development of robust pathways toward future environmental and socioeconomic sustainability. We use a participatory modelling tool, Kesho, to assess the biophysical, socioeconomic, cultural and governance factors that influenced past (1959-1999) and present (2000-2018) LULCC in northern Tanzania and to simulate four scenarios of land cover change to the year 2030. Simulations of the scenarios used spatial modelling to integrate stakeholders' perceptions of future environmental change with social and environmental data on recent trends in LULCC. From stakeholders' perspectives, between 1959 and 2018, LULCC was influenced by climate variability, availability of natural resources, agriculture expansion, urbanization, tourism growth and legislation governing land access and natural resource management. Among other socio-environmental-political LULCC drivers, the stakeholders envisioned that from 2018 to 2030 LULCC will largely be influenced by land health, natural and economic capital, and political will in implementing land use plans and policies. The projected scenarios suggest that by 2030 agricultural land will have expanded by 8-20% under different scenarios and herbaceous vegetation and forest land cover will be reduced by 2.5-5% and 10-19% respectively. Stakeholder discussions further identified desirable futures in 2030 as those with improved infrastructure, restored degraded landscapes, effective wildlife conservation, and better farming techniques. The undesirable futures in 2030 were those characterized by land degradation, poverty, and cultural loss. Insights from our work identify the implications of future LULCC scenarios on wildlife and cultural conservation and in meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets by 2030. The Kesho approach capitalizes on knowledge exchanges among diverse stakeholders, and in the process promotes social learning, provides a sense of ownership of outputs generated, democratizes scientific understanding, and improves the quality and relevance of the outputs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2021
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-440160 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0245516 (DOI)000620071700046 ()33577608 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas, 201606355Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2021-04-26 Created: 2021-04-26 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Ekblom, A., Shoemaker, A., Gillson, L., Lane, P. & Lindholm, K.-J. (2019). Conservation through Biocultural Heritage-Examples from Sub-Saharan Africa. Land, 8(1), Article ID 5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conservation through Biocultural Heritage-Examples from Sub-Saharan Africa
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 5Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we review the potential of biocultural heritage in biodiversity protection and agricultural innovation in sub-Saharan Africa. We begin by defining the concept of biocultural heritage into four interlinked elements that are revealed through integrated landscape analysis. This concerns the transdisciplinary methods whereby biocultural heritage must be explored, and here we emphasise that reconstructing landscape histories and documenting local heritage values needs to be an integral part of the process. Ecosystem memories relate to the structuring of landscape heterogeneity through such activities as agroforestry and fire management. The positive linkages between living practices, biodiversity and soil nutrients examined here are demonstrative of the concept of ecosystem memories. Landscape memories refer to built or enhanced landscapes linked to specific land-use systems and property rights. Place memories signify practices of protection or use related to a specific place. Customary protection of burial sites and/or abandoned settlements, for example, is a common occurrence across Africa with beneficial outcomes for biodiversity and forest protection. Finally, we discuss stewardship and change. Building on local traditions, inclusivity and equity are essential to promoting the continuation and innovation of practices crucial for local sustainability and biodiversity protection, and also offer new avenues for collaboration in landscape management and conservation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
biocultural heritage, sub-Saharan Africa, traditional ecological knowledge, hotspots, sacred forests, conservation
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377802 (URN)10.3390/land8010005 (DOI)000458029900005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council FormasEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 606879Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2023-02-06Bibliographically approved
Shoemaker, A. & Davies, M. I. J. (2019). Grinding-stone implements in the eastern African Pastoral Neolithic. Azania, 54(2), 203-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grinding-stone implements in the eastern African Pastoral Neolithic
2019 (English)In: Azania, ISSN 0067-270X, E-ISSN 1945-5534, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 203-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Grinding-stone tools are a poorly utilised source of archaeological information in eastern Africa. Their presence is noted in multiple contexts, including both domestic and funerary, yet the inferences drawn from them are often limited. This short review paper presents existing information on grinding-stone tools (and stone bowls) from Pastoral Neolithic (PN) contexts in eastern Africa. Data on the diverse grinding-stone tool assemblages of the Pastoral Neolithic have been compiled with a focus on details of morphology and spatial, temporal and contextual distribution. Summarising what is known (and, perhaps more importantly, what is not known) about grinding-stones in the Pastoral Neolithic, this paper serves as a reminder that the function of grinding-stone tools was neither singular nor their significance simplistic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
grinding-stone tools, Pastoral Neolithic, funerary archaeology, eastern Africa
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396152 (URN)10.1080/0067270X.2019.1619284 (DOI)000478550800001 ()
Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-04Bibliographically approved
Boles, O. J. C., Shoemaker, A., Courtney Mustaphi, C. J., Petek, N., Ekblom, A. & Lane, P. J. (2019). Historical Ecologies of Pastoralist Overgrazing in Kenya: Long-Term Perspectives on Cause and Effect. Human Ecology, 47(3), 419-434
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Historical Ecologies of Pastoralist Overgrazing in Kenya: Long-Term Perspectives on Cause and Effect
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 419-434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spectre of overgrazing' looms large in historical and political narratives of ecological degradation in savannah ecosystems. While pastoral exploitation is a conspicuous driver of landscape variability and modification, assumptions that such change is inevitable or necessarily negative deserve to be continuously evaluated and challenged. With reference to three case studies from Kenya - the Laikipia Plateau, the Lake Baringo basin, and the Amboseli ecosystem - we argue that the impacts of pastoralism are contingent on the diachronic interactions of locally specific environmental, political, and cultural conditions. The impacts of the compression of rangelands and restrictions on herd mobility driven by misguided conservation and economic policies are emphasised over outdated notions of pastoralist inefficiency. We review the application of overgrazing' in interpretations of the archaeological record and assess its relevance for how we interpret past socio-environmental dynamics. Any discussion of overgrazing, or any form of human-environment interaction, must acknowledge spatio-temporal context and account for historical variability in landscape ontogenies.

Keywords
Historical ecology, Compression effects, Rangeland management, Pastoralist mobility strategies, Eastern Africa, Kenya
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392058 (URN)10.1007/s10745-019-0072-9 (DOI)000475981900009 ()
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 606879Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council FormasSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Marchant, R., Richer, S., Boles, O., Capitani, C., Courtney Mustaphi, C., Lane, P., . . . Wright, D. (2018). Drivers and trajectories of land cover change in East Africa: Human and environmental interactions from 6000 years ago to present. Earth-Science Reviews, 178, 322-378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers and trajectories of land cover change in East Africa: Human and environmental interactions from 6000 years ago to present
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Earth-Science Reviews, ISSN 0012-8252, E-ISSN 1872-6828, Vol. 178, p. 322-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

East African landscapes today are the result of the cumulative effects of climate and land-use change over millennial timescales. In this review, we compile archaeological and palaeoenvironmental data from East Africa to document land-cover change, and environmental, subsistence and land-use transitions, over the past 6000 years. Throughout East Africa there have been a series of relatively rapid and high-magnitude environmental shifts characterised by changing hydrological budgets during the mid- to late Holocene. For example, pronounced environmental shifts that manifested as a marked change in the rainfall amount or seasonality and subsequent hydrological budget throughout East Africa occurred around 4000, 800 and 300 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). The past 6000 years have also seen numerous shifts in human interactions with East African ecologies. From the mid-Holocene, land use has both diversified and increased exponentially, this has been associated with the arrival of new subsistence systems, crops, migrants and technologies, all giving rise to a sequence of significant phases of land-cover change. The first large-scale human influences began to occur around 4000 yr BP, associated with the introduction of domesticated livestock and the expansion of pastoral communities. The first widespread and intensive forest clearances were associated with the arrival of iron-using early farming communities around 2500 yr BP, particularly in productive and easily-cleared mid-altitudinal areas. Extensive and pervasive land-cover change has been associated with population growth, immigration and movement of people. The expansion of trading routes between the interior and the coast, starting around 1300 years ago and intensifying in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries CE, was one such process. These caravan routes possibly acted as conduits for spreading New World crops such as maize (Zea mays), tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum), although the processes and timings of their introductions remains poorly documented. The introduction of southeast Asian domesticates, especially banana (Musa spp.), rice (Oryza spp.), taro (Colocasia esculenta), and chicken (Gallus gallus), via transoceanic biological transfers around and across the Indian Ocean, from at least around 1300 yr BP, and potentially significantly earlier, also had profound social and ecological consequences across parts of the region. Through an interdisciplinary synthesis of information and metadatasets, we explore the different drivers and directions of changes in land-cover, and the associated environmental histories and interactions with various cultures, technologies, and subsistence strategies through time and across space in East Africa. This review suggests topics for targeted future research that focus on areas and/or time periods where our understanding of the interactions between people, the environment and land-cover change are most contentious and/or poorly resolved. The review also offers a perspective on how knowledge of regional land-use change can be used to inform and provide perspectives on contemporary issues such as climate and ecosystem change models, conservation strategies, and the achievement of nature-based solutions for development purposes.

Keywords
Archaeology, Iron technology, Pottery, Pastoralism, Agriculture, Livelihoods, Palaeoenvironments, Savannah, LandCover6k, Sustainable Development Goals, Land use
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387469 (URN)10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.12.010 (DOI)000430774000014 ()
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 606879-REALSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council FormasEU, European Research Council, ERC-2013-StG-337128-AAREAEU, European Research Council, 313797Wenner-Gren Foundations, 9133
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Shoemaker, A. (2018). Location and attribute analysis of ceramics, lithics, and special finds recovered during 2015 surveys and excavations in Olgulului/Olarashi Group Ranch, Kenya: A supplement to the PhD thesis of Anna C. Shoemaker (2018) on the archaeology of Amboseli.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Location and attribute analysis of ceramics, lithics, and special finds recovered during 2015 surveys and excavations in Olgulului/Olarashi Group Ranch, Kenya: A supplement to the PhD thesis of Anna C. Shoemaker (2018) on the archaeology of Amboseli
2018 (English)Data set, Primary data
Abstract [en]

This data was acquired during the production of a PhD thesis pertaining to the archaeology of Amboseli. The amount of information obtained during ceramic and lithic analysis was often in excess of the immediate aims of this research project. This level of detail was recorded to build a robust dataset that will allow different questions to be asked of the data in the future. To facilitate ongoing analysis, supplementary data relating to the attributes and location of the lithics, ceramics, and special finds encountered during surveys and excavations has been made available here.

National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355266 (URN)
Available from: 2018-06-27 Created: 2018-06-27 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Shoemaker, A. (2018). Pastoral pasts in the Amboseli landscape: An archaeological exploration of the Amboseli ecosystem from the later Holocene to the colonial period. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pastoral pasts in the Amboseli landscape: An archaeological exploration of the Amboseli ecosystem from the later Holocene to the colonial period
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Amboseli ecosystem, home of Amboseli National Park, is renowned for its extraordinary biodiversity, and has long drawn the attention of conservationists and ecologists hoping to safeguard the healthy functioning of this Kenyan rangeland and the pastoral traditions that have brought this landscape into being. There is major concern currently however, as present day Amboseli pastoral livelihoods are said to be in decline owing to rangelands being settled, fenced, and converted to farmland. The processes by which pastoral livelihood diversification is occurring in this landscape have historical roots, and appreciating this context is an important component of understanding current trends in socio-economic and environmental adaptability and sustainability. Yet, the human history of Amboseli’s ecosystem tends to be conceptualised and discussed by scholars in terms of a narrow and ahistorical model of subsistence-based pastoralism. The research presented in this thesis provides an alternative history of pastoral pasts in Amboseli.

In more specific terms, the primary focus of this thesis is detailing and analysing the results of archaeological surveys and the excavation of ten sites located on Olgulului/Ololarashi group ranch, an archaeological terra incognita. These date to varying stages of the last few millennia. Inspired by the interdisciplinary approach of historical ecology, these exploratory archaeological findings are contextualised and integrated with archival, palaeoenvironmental, ecological, linguistic, and local knowledge sources. In doing so, I present a culture history of Amboseli, and an examination of the evidence for livestock herding in this landscape organised into three parts: the mid-Holocene arrival of domestic stock and emergence of specialised pastoralism; the Early to Late Iron Ages; and finally, the 19th century and colonial period. Throughout these chapters, a continuous theme discussed is the multitude of ways in which cultivation and trade have featured in the Amboseli landscape and contributed to the livelihoods of pastoral people inhabiting this ecosystem. In delving into the history of pastoralism in Amboseli, it is apparent that both its occupants’ livelihoods and the landscape itself must be understood as having been shaped by a heterogeneity of economic pursuits and resource use strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, 2018. p. 320
Series
Studies in Global Archaeology, ISSN 1651-1255 ; 25
Keywords
Pastoralism, Amboseli, Historical Archaeology, Eastern Africa, Eastern African Iron Age, Maasai, Pastoral Archaeology, Usable Pasts
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356055 (URN)978-91-506-2718-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-09-28, University Main Building, Room IX, Biskopsgatan 3, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-08-12 Last updated: 2018-09-06
Githumbi, E. N., Kariuki, R., Shoemaker, A., Courtney Mustaphi, C., Chuhila, M., Richer, S., . . . Marchant, R. (2018). Pollen, People and Place: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Ecosystem Change at Amboseli, Kenya. Frontiers in Earth Science, 5, 1-26, Article ID 113.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pollen, People and Place: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Ecosystem Change at Amboseli, Kenya
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Earth Science, E-ISSN 2296-6463, Vol. 5, p. 1-26, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study presents a multidisciplinary perspective for understanding environmental change and emerging socio-ecological interactions across the Amboseli region of southwestern Kenya. We focus on late Holocene (<5,000 cal yr. BP) changes and continuities reconstructed from sedimentary, archeological, historical records and socio-ecological models. We utilize multi-disciplinary approaches to understand environmental-ecosystem-social interactions over the longue durée and use this to simulate different land use scenarios supporting conservation and sustainable livelihoods using a socio-ecological model. Today the semi-arid Amboseli landscape supports a large livestock and wildlife population, sustained by a wide variety of plants and extensive rangelands regulated by seasonal rainfall and human activity. Our data provide insight into how large-scale and long-term interactions of climate, people, livestock, wildlife and external connections have shaped the ecosystems across the Amboseli landscape. Environmental conditions were dry between ~5,000 and 2,000 cal yr. BP, followed by two wet periods at ~2,100–1,500 and 1,400–800 cal yr. BP with short dry periods; the most recent centuries were characterized by variable climate with alternative dry and wet phases with high spatial heterogeneity. Most evident in paleo and historical records is the changing woody to grass cover ratio, driven by changes in climate and fire regimes entwined with fluctuating elephant, cattle and wild ungulate populations moderated by human activity, including elephant ivory trade intensification. Archeological perspectives on the occupation of different groups (hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, and farmers) in Amboseli region and the relationships between them are discussed. An overview of the known history of humans and elephants, expanding networks of trade, and the arrival and integration of metallurgy, livestock and domesticated crops in the wider region is provided. In recent decades, increased runoff and flooding have resulted in the expansion of wetlands and a reduction of woody vegetation, compounding problems created by increased enclosure and privatization of these landscapes. However, most of the wetlands outside of the protected area are drying up because of the intensified water extraction by the communities surrounding the National Park and on the adjacent mountains areas, who have increased in numbers, become sedentary and diversified land use around the wetlands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Africa, groundwater, land cover, land use, paleovegetation, protected areas, vegetation, wetlands
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339992 (URN)10.3389/feart.2017.00113 (DOI)000426113500001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencySwedish Research Council Formas, 2016-06355
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1416-436X

Search in DiVA

Show all publications