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Martinossi-Allibert, Ivain
Alternative names
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Martinossi-Allibert, I. (2017). An evolutionary perspective on sex in animals.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An evolutionary perspective on sex in animals
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Series
Introductory research essay / Department of Animal Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, ISSN 1404-4919 ; 105
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322737 (URN)
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2017-05-31Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I., Clavel, J., Ducatez, S., Viol, I. L. & Teplitsky, C. (2017). Does habitat specialization shape the evolutionary potential of wild bird populations?. Journal of Avian Biology, 48(8), 1158-1165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does habitat specialization shape the evolutionary potential of wild bird populations?
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 1158-1165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Because specialist species evolved in more temporally and spatially homogeneous environments than generalist species, they are supposed to experience less fluctuating selection. For this reason, we expect specialists to show lower overall genetic variation as compared to generalists. We also expect populations from specialist species to be smaller and more fragmented, with lower neutral genetic diversity. We tested these hypotheses by investigating patterns of genetic diversity along a habitat specialization gradient in wild birds, based on estimates of heritability, coefficients of variation of additive genetic variance, and heterozygosity available in the literature. We found no significant effect of habitat specialization on any of the quantitative genetic estimators but generalists had higher heterozygosity. This effect was mainly a consequence of the larger population size of generalists. Our results suggest that evolutionary potential does not differ at the population level between generalist and specialist species, but the trend observed in heterozygosity levels and population sizes may explain their difference in susceptibility to extinction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335248 (URN)10.1111/jav.01011 (DOI)000408813800013 ()
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I., Arnqvist, G. & Berger, D. (2017). Sex-specific selection under environmental stress in seed beetles. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 30(1), 161-173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific selection under environmental stress in seed beetles
2017 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 161-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sexual selection can increase rates of adaptation by imposing strong selection in males, thereby allowing efficient purging of the mutation load on population fitness at a low demographic cost. Indeed, sexual selection tends to be male-biased throughout the animal kingdom, but little empirical work has explored the ecological sensitivity of this sex difference. In this study, we generated theoretical predictions of sex-specific strengths of selection, environmental sensitivities and genotype-by-environment interactions and tested them in seed beetles by manipulating either larval host plant or rearing temperature. Using fourteen isofemale lines, we measured sex-specific reductions in fitness components, genotype-by-environment interactions and the strength of selection (variance in fitness) in the juvenile and adult stage. As predicted, variance in fitness increased with stress, was consistently greater in males than females for adult reproductive success (implying strong sexual selection), but was similar in the sexes in terms of juvenile survival across all levels of stress. Although genetic variance in fitness increased in magnitude under severe stress, heritability decreased and particularly so in males. Moreover, genotype-by-environment interactions for fitness were common but specific to the type of stress, sex and life stage, suggesting that new environments may change the relative alignment and strength of selection in males and females. Our study thus exemplifies how environmental stress can influence the relative forces of natural and sexual selection, as well as concomitant changes in genetic variance in fitness, which are predicted to have consequences for rates of adaptation in sexual populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2017
Keyword
adaptation, Callosobruchus maculatus, environmental change, host plant, natural selection, population viability, sexual reproduction, sexual selection, stress, temperature
National Category
Zoology Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331971 (URN)10.1111/jeb.12996 (DOI)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333Swedish Research Council, 621-2010-5266 261-2014-4523
Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2017-10-24Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I. (2017). Sexual Selection and Adaptation to Novel Environments. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexual Selection and Adaptation to Novel Environments
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The work included in this thesis aims at exploring the environmental sensitivity of benefits and costs of sexual selection through a combined empirical and theoretical effort, to increase our understanding of the impact of environmental change on sexually reproducing populations.Can sexual selection promote adaptation to novel environments? Sexual selection for good genes should accelerate adaptation by granting higher reproductive success to individuals of high genetic quality. However, sexual conflict is a frequent outcome of sexual reproduction and may often be detrimental to population fitness. Experimental evolution has shown that the role of sexual selection in adaptation is variable, because of a complex balance between the detrimental and beneficial effects described above.The present thesis is investigating the role of sexual selection in adaptation by focusing on the sex-specific strength of selection and the intensity of intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC) in ancestral and novel environments. The sex-specific strength of selection is a valuable proxy for the benefits of sexual reproduction, since a male-bias in selection caused by sexual selection should allow efficient purging of deleterious alleles with little impact on female fecundity and cost to population fitness.This thesis investigates both sex-specific selection and IaSC across benign and novel environments in two species of seed beetles, Callosobruchus maculatus and Acanthoscelides obtectus, and includes a theoretical model of the effect of environmental change on of sexual selection. The empirical part of my results indicates that, generally, selection at the adult stage is male biased but that this male bias may be reduced under stress, pointing towards reduced benefits of sexual selection under rapid environmental change. Additional simulations suggest that the frequency dependent nature of sexual selection alone could explain this trend. No empirical support was found for the reduction of IaSC under stress.It is becoming crucial today to understand the impact of environmental change on natural populations. This thesis brings new material adding to our understanding of the role of sexual selection within that particular issue. The outcome of sexual selection is dependent on a variety of mechanisms, such as good genes processes and sexual conflict, which are very likely to be dependent on ecological factors and specificity of the system studied. For that reason, carefully controlled experiments on laboratory systems and mathematical modelling are necessary steps that should ultimately lead to the study of similar questions in natural systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2017. p. 40
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1590
Keyword
Sexual selection, Environmental change, Sexual conflict, Environmental stress, Adaptation, Adaptive landscape
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332119 (URN)978-91-513-0131-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-12-15, Lindhalsalen, Norbyväagen 18, 75236, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2018-03-07
Berger, D., Stångberg, J., Grieshop, K., Martinossi-Allibert, I. & Arnqvist, G. (2017). Temperature effects on life-history trade-offs, germline maintenance and mutation rate under simulated climate warming. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 284(1866), Article ID 20171721.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temperature effects on life-history trade-offs, germline maintenance and mutation rate under simulated climate warming
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, no 1866, article id 20171721Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mutation has a fundamental influence over evolutionary processes, but how evolutionary processes shape mutation rate remains less clear. In asexual unicellular organism, increased mutation rates have been observed in stressful environments and the reigning paradigm ascribes this increase to selection for evolvability. However, this explanation does not apply in sexually reproducing species, where little is known about how the environment affects mutation rate. Here we challenged experimental lines of seed beetle, evolved at ancestral temperature or under simulated climate warming, to repair induced mutations at ancestral and stressful temperature. Results show that temperature stress causes individuals to pass on a greater mutation load to their grand-offspring. This suggests that stress-induced mutation rates, in unicellular and multicellular organisms alike, can result from compromised germline DNA repair in low condition individuals. Moreover, lines adapted to simulated climate warming had evolved increased longevity at the cost of reproduction, and this allocation decision improved germline repair. These results suggest that mutation rates can be modulated by resource allocation trade-offs encompassing life-history traits and the germline and have important implications for rates of adaptation and extinction as well as our understanding of genetic diversity in multicellular organisms.

Keyword
life history, trade-off, temperature adaptation, mutation rate, phenotypic plasticity, climate change
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341989 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2017.1721 (DOI)000414773600014 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-05223; 621-2014-4523EU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I.The consequences of sexual selection in well-adapted and amaladapted populations of bean beetles: Sexual selection in maladapted populations.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The consequences of sexual selection in well-adapted and amaladapted populations of bean beetles: Sexual selection in maladapted populations
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Whether sexual selection generally promotes or impedes population persistence remains an open question. Intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC) can render sexual selection in males detrimental to the population by increasing the frequency of alleles with positive effects on male reproductive success but negative effects on female fecundity. Recent modelling based on fitness landscape theory, however, indicates that the relative impact of IaSC may be reduced in maladapted populations and that sexual selection therefore might promote adaptation when it is most needed. Here, we test this prediction using bean beetles that had undergone 80 generations of experimental evolution on two alternative host plants. We isolated and assessed the effect of maladaptation on sex-specific strengths of selection and IaSC by cross-rearing the two experimental evolution regimes on the alternative hosts and estimating within-population genetic (co)variance for fitness in males and females. Two key predictions were upheld: males generally experienced stronger selection compared to females and maladaptation increased selection in females. However, maladaptation consistently decreased male-bias in the strength of selection and IaSC was not reduced in maladapted populations. These findings imply that sexual selection can be disrupted in stressful environmental conditions, thus reducing one of the potential benefits of sexual reproduction in maladapted populations.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331970 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2017-10-24Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I., Rueffler, C., Arnqvist, G. & Berger, D.The efficiency of purifying sexual selection under environmental change.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The efficiency of purifying sexual selection under environmental change
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Sexual selection can promote adaptation if sexually selected traits are reliable indicators of the bearer’s condition and overall genetic quality. Moreover, stronger sexual selection in males, as often reported in empirical studies, may efficiently purge deleterious alleles at a low cost to population productivity. However, such benefits of sexual selection have been suggested to be compromised during adaptation in a changing environment due to a disruption of the mate choice process. Indeed, substantial insight has been gained from previous theoretical and empirical studies focusing on exploring female choice and the reliability of male sexual signals across environments. In this study, we show that even if sexually selected traits are honest signals and accurately reflect condition in new environments, the efficacy of sexual selection is likely to be reduced under stress. We model the strength of sex-specific selection in a population with males competing among each other for fertilization success and females experiencing fecundity selection. We observe that, for most of the biologically relevant parameter space describing mating system variation, the strength of sexual selection is reduced relatively to fecundity selection as the population becomes increasingly maladapted under environmental change. This result, which is modulated by the characteristics of the mating system, is a direct consequence of the prominent role of social context (frequency-dependence) in sexual selection.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332106 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2017-10-27Bibliographically approved
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