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Friman, Göran
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Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Rolf, C. G., Fu, S.-C., Hopkins, C., Luan, J., Ip, M., Yung, S.-H., . . . Chan, K.-M. (2017). Presence of Bacteria in Spontaneous Achilles Tendon Ruptures. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 45(9), 2061-2067
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Presence of Bacteria in Spontaneous Achilles Tendon Ruptures
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 2061-2067Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The structural pathology of Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures resembles tendinopathy, but the causes remain unknown. Recently, a number of diseases were found to be attributed to bacterial infections, resulting in low-grade inflammation and progressive matrix disturbance. The authors speculate that spontaneous AT ruptures may also be influenced by the presence of bacteria.

Hypothesis: Bacteria are present in ruptured ATs but not in healthy tendons.

Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: Patients with spontaneous AT ruptures and patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction were recruited for this study. During AT surgical repair, excised tendinopathic tissue was collected, and healthy tendon samples were obtained as controls from hamstring tendon grafts used in ACL reconstruction. Half of every sample was reserved for DNA extraction and the other half for histology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using 16S rRNA gene universal primers, and the PCR products were sequenced for the identification of bacterial species. A histological examination was performed to compare tendinopathic changes in the case and control samples.

Results: Five of 20 AT rupture samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA, while none of the 23 hamstring tendon samples were positive. Sterile operating and experimental conditions and tests on samples, controlling for harvesting and processing procedures, ruled out the chance of postoperative bacterial contamination. The species identified predominantly belonged to the Staphylococcus genus. AT rupture samples exhibited histopathological features characteristic of tendinopathy, and most healthy hamstring tendon samples displayed normal tendon features. There were no apparent differences in histopathology between the bacterial DNA-positive and bacterial DNA-negative AT rupture samples.

Conclusion: The authors have demonstrated the presence of bacterial DNA in ruptured AT samples. It may suggest the potential involvement of bacteria in spontaneous AT ruptures.

Keywords
tendinopathy, bacteria, 16S rRNA, Achilles tendon
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332193 (URN)10.1177/0363546517696315 (DOI)000405756600015 ()28355086 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Friman, G. & Thelin, S. (2011). Nytt ljus över infektiös endokardit. Vaskulariserade hjärtklaffar kan spela roll i patogenesen: [New light over infectious endocarditis. Vascularization of heart valves can play a role in the pathogenesis]. Läkartidningen, 108(45), 2272-2273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nytt ljus över infektiös endokardit. Vaskulariserade hjärtklaffar kan spela roll i patogenesen: [New light over infectious endocarditis. Vascularization of heart valves can play a role in the pathogenesis]
2011 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 45, p. 2272-2273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-170543 (URN)22242240 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-03-12 Created: 2012-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Ehrenborg, C., Byström, R., Hjelm, E., Friman, G. & Holmberg, M. (2008). High Bartonella spp. seroprevalence in a Swedish homeless population but no evidence of trench fever. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 40(3), 208-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High Bartonella spp. seroprevalence in a Swedish homeless population but no evidence of trench fever
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2008 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 208-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood samples and epidemiological data were collected from 50 homeless patients in central Stockholm, Sweden. Sera were analysed for antibodies to B. henselae, B. quintana, B. elizabethae and B. grahamii. Whole blood was cultured and used as substrate for a newly developed quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) specifically targeting Bartonella spp. DNA. 61 matched blood donor sera were used as controls. Homeless patients were significantly more often seropositive to Bartonella spp. than controls (OR 7.58 (3.30-17.39), p<0.05). Reactivity to the B. elizabethae antigen was dominating, although the difference between patients and controls was most significant in seroreactivity to the B. henselae antigen. There was no evidence of an ongoing B. quintana epidemic. The absence of louse infestation could explain the lack of B. quintana bacteraemia and the failure to amplify Bartonella DNA.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11960 (URN)10.1080/00365540701632972 (DOI)000253335900003 ()17852922 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-11-07 Created: 2009-03-19 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Frisk, P., Tallkvist, J., Gadhasson, I.-L., Blomberg, J., Friman, G. & Ilbäck, N.-G. (2007). Coxsackievirus B3 infection affects metal-binding/transporting proteins and trace elements in the pancreas in mice. Pancreas, 35(3), e37-e44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coxsackievirus B3 infection affects metal-binding/transporting proteins and trace elements in the pancreas in mice
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2007 (English)In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 35, no 3, p. e37-e44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The trigger of juvenile diabetes has been suggested to be an interaction between a virus and trace elements, where enteroviruses, including coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), have been discussed as potential initiators. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects in the pancreas on gene expressions of metallothionein 1 (MT1), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and zinc transporter 5 (ZnT-5) and concomitant changes in iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in serum and pancreas of Balb/c mice on days 3, 6, and 9 of CVB3 infection. Methods: Trace elements were measured through inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and CVB3, MT1, DMT1, and ZnT-5 were measured by reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction. Results: Virus was found in the pancreas on all days, with a peak on day 3. Infection tended to increase Fe in both serum and the pancreas. The Cu/Zn ratio in the pancreas increased early in the infection because of a great decrease in Zn. In serum, the Cu/Zn ratio was not increased until day 9 of the disease. In the pancreas, MT1 decreased, whereas DMT1 tended to increase on day 6, and ZnT-5 increased progressively during the course of the disease. Conclusions: Virus-induced changes in trace elements, MT1, DMT1, and ZnT-5 in the pancreas may reflect early stages of the development of pancreatitis and prestages of diabetic disease.

Keywords
copper, coxsackievirus, MT1, pancreas, zinc, ZnT-5
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11955 (URN)10.1097/mpa.0b013e3180986e84 (DOI)000252179000023 ()17895834 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-11-07 Created: 2007-11-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Ilbäck, N.-G. & Friman, G. (2007). Interactions among infections, nutrients and xenobiotics. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, 47(5), 499-519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions among infections, nutrients and xenobiotics
2007 (English)In: Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, ISSN 1040-8398, E-ISSN 1549-7852, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 499-519Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During recent years there have been several incidents in which symptoms of disease have been linked to consumption of food contaminated by chemical substances (e.g., 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD). Furthermore, outbreaks of infections in food-producing animals have attracted major attention regarding the safety of consumers, e.g., Bovine Spongiform Encephalitis (BSE) and influenza in chicken. As shown for several xenobiotics in an increasing number of experimental studies, even low-dose xenobiotic exposure may impair immune function over time, as well as microorganism virulence, resulting in more severe infectious diseases and associated complications. Moreover, during ongoing infection, xenobiotic uptake and distribution are often changed resulting in increased toxic insult to the host. The interactions among infectious agents, nutrients, and xenobiotics have thus become a developing concern and new avenue of research in food toxicology as well as in food-borne diseases. From a health perspective, in the risk assessment of xenobiotics in our food and environment, synergistic effects among microorganisms, nutrients, and xenobiotics will have to be considered. Otherwise, such effects may gradually change the disease panorama in society.

Keywords
Infection, nutrients, risk assessment, xenobiotics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11959 (URN)10.1080/10408390600919015 (DOI)000247380800003 ()
Available from: 2007-11-07 Created: 2007-11-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Frisk, P., Darnerud, P. O., Friman, G., Blomberg, J. & Ilbäck, N.-G. (2007). Sequential trace element changes in serum and blood during a common viral infection in mice. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 21(1), 29-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sequential trace element changes in serum and blood during a common viral infection in mice
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0946-672X, E-ISSN 1878-3252, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When trace elements are used as diagnostic tools during disease, it is important to know whether the balance is changed in free or bound elements. Although acute infections are associated with changed trace element balance in serum/plasma, it is not known whether changes occur concomitantly in serum and blood. In the present study the human coxsackievirus B3 (CB3), here adapted to Balb/c mice, was used to study whether infection alters the normal physiological trace element balance in blood and serum. Virus was quantitatively measured in two target organs (pancreas and liver) of this infection by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), showing high concentrations of virus proving ongoing infection. Concentrations of 14 elements were measured in whole blood and serum using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) on days 3, 6 and 9 of the infection. Free and total thyroxine were measured in serum to prove metabolic changes associated with the infection. The thyroxine decreased, while iron and the Cu/Zn ratio in serum increased as a response to the infection. No clear changes in these elements were observed in blood. Cd and Hg tended to decrease in serum but to increase in blood, indicating accumulation in blood cells. Moreover, Al showed a similar decreasing trend in both serum and blood. A correlation between serum and blood levels was observed at different time points of the disease for 9 of the elements. However, As was the only element indicating correlations between serum and blood during the entire course of the disease.

Keywords
Blood, Serum, Thyroxine, Trace elements, Virus
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11957 (URN)10.1016/j.jtemb.2006.11.003 (DOI)000245350300005 ()17317523 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-11-07 Created: 2007-11-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Ilbäck, N.-G., Frisk, P., Mohamed, N., Gadhasson, I.-L., Blomberg, J. & Friman, G. (2007). Virus induces metal-binding proteins and changed trace element balance in the brain during the course of a common human infection (coxsackievirus B3) in mice. Science of the Total Environment, 381(1-3), 88-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virus induces metal-binding proteins and changed trace element balance in the brain during the course of a common human infection (coxsackievirus B3) in mice
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2007 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 381, no 1-3, p. 88-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autopsy of the brain has shown a change in trace element balance in some virus-infected individuals, but it is not known whether this event was a result of the infection. In the present study coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) adapted to Balb/c mice was used to study whether infection induces gene expression of the metal-binding/transporting proteins metallothionein (MT1 and MT3) and divalent-metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and whether it changes the balance of trace elements in the brain. Virus and MT1, MT3, and DMT1 were quantitatively measured by RT-PCR on days 3, 6 and 9 of the infection. Trace elements (13) were measured in serum and the brain by ICP-MS. High numbers of virus were found in the brain on days 3 and 6, but virus counts were decreased and present only in 50% of the mice on day 9. Gene expression of MT1 tended to increase on all days, whereas that of MT3 only showed a minor and not significant increase on day 3. No clear effect was observed in the expression of DMT1. The increase of MT3 was correlated to the brain concentration of Cu. The Cu/Zn ratio in serum increased as a response to the infection. There was a similar decrease in Cd in serum and the brain. On day 6 of the infection, Hg increased in the brain (p<0.05) and was positively correlated to a concomitant decrease (p<0.05) in serum. Virus numbers in the brain were on day 6 positively correlated (p<0.05) to As concentrations. Enteroviral infections may therefore be an underlying factor regarding the changes in essential as well as potentially toxic trace elements in the brain.

Keywords
Brain, MT1, MT3, DMT1, Trace elements, Virus
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11958 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2007.03.025 (DOI)000247831700008 ()17467775 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-11-07 Created: 2007-11-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Nyström-Rosander, C., Edvinsson, M., Thelin, S., Hjelm, E. & Friman, G. (2006). Chlamydophila pneumonia: Specific mRNA in aorta ascendens in patients undergoing coronary artery by-pass grafting. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 38(9), 758-763
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chlamydophila pneumonia: Specific mRNA in aorta ascendens in patients undergoing coronary artery by-pass grafting
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2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 758-763Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this prospective study was to investigate if Chlamydophila pneumoniae (Cp)-specific DNA and mRNA are present in tissue samples from the wall of aorta ascendens in patients undergoing by-pass surgery for coronary artery disease (CAD) that includes stable angina pectoris (SAP, 25 patients) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS, 19 patients). Viable Cp was detected in 8/44 (18%) patients using reversed transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) against bacterial mRNA with detection of cDNA using real-time PCR against the MOMP gene. Cp DNA was detected by nested PCR in 22/44 (50%) patients and by real-time PCR in 13/44 (30%) patients. In total, 24/44 (55%) patients were positive for Cp nucleic acid in any PCR. Antibodies to Cp were detected in 13/24 (54%) Cp PCR-positive and in 15/20 (75%) Cp PCR-negative patients. Nested PCR was run on throat swabs from all patients. No significant differences were noted between SAP and ACS patients regarding PCR results or serology. It has been suggested that Cp may be a 'silent passenger' picked up by the atherosclerotic plaque. Our findings of viable and metabolically active bacteria in aortic tissue add further support to the hypothesis that Cp may have an active role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97115 (URN)10.1080/00365540600617058 (DOI)000240109600001 ()16938728 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-04-25 Created: 2008-04-25 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Ilbäck, N.-G., Lindh, U., Minqin, R., Friman, G. & Watt, F. (2006). Iron and copper accumulation in the brain of coxsackievirus-infected mice exposed to cadmium. Environmental Research, 102(3), 308-313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Iron and copper accumulation in the brain of coxsackievirus-infected mice exposed to cadmium
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2006 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 308-313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cadmium (Cd) is a potentially toxic metal widely distributed in the environment and known to cause adverse health effects in humans. During coxsackievirus infection, the concentrations of essential and nonessential trace elements (e.g., iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and Cd) change in different target organs of the infection. Fe and Cu are recognized cofactors in host defence reactions, and Fe is known to be associated with certain pathological conditions of the brain. However, whether nonessential trace elements could influence the balance of essential trace elements in the brain is unknown. In this study the brain Fe, Cu, and Cd contents were measured through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and their distributions determined by nuclear microscopy in the early phase (day 3) of coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection in nonexposed and in Cd-exposed female Balb/c mice. In CB3 infection the brain is a well-known target that has not been studied with regard to trace element balance. The brain concentration of Cu compared with that of noninfected control mice was increased by 9% (P < 0.05) in infected mice not exposed to Cd and by 10% (not significant) in infected Cd-exposed mice. A similar response was seen for Fe, which in infected Cd-exposed mice, compared to noninfected control mice, tended to increase by 16%. Cu showed an even tissue distribution, whereas Fe was distributed in focal deposits. Changes in Cd concentration in the brain of infected mice were less consistent but evenly distributed. Further studies are needed to define whether the accumulation and distribution of trace elements in the brain have an impact on brain function.

Keywords
Brain, Cadmium, Copper, Iron, Mass spectrometry, Nuclear microscopy, Virus
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-131238 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2006.02.004 (DOI)000242228300007 ()16616136 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-09-28 Created: 2010-09-28 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
McGill, S., Wesslén, L., Hjelm, E., Holmberg, M., Auvinen, M. K., Berggren, K., . . . Friman, G. (2005). Bartonella spp. seroprevalence in healthy Swedish blood donors. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 37(10), 723-730
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bartonella spp. seroprevalence in healthy Swedish blood donors
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2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 723-730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Serum samples were collected from healthy blood donors in 5 regions in Sweden in 1999, i.e. from the local Blood Centres (collecting facilities) in Boden, Jönköping, Lund, Skövde, and Uppsala. In total, 498 serum samples (63% males, 37% females) were received and tested by immunofluorescence assay for antibodies against B. elizabethae, B. grahamii, B. henselae (Houston-1), B. henselae (Marseille), B. quintana, and B. vinsonii subsp. vinsonii. An overall Bartonella spp. seroprevalence of 16.1% was found, with a predominance of immunoreactivity to B. elizabethae, at 14.1%; B. grahamii, 2.6%; B. henselae (Houston-1), 1.2%; B. henselae (Marseille), 1.8%; B. quintana, 0.2%; and B. vinsonii subsp. vinsonii, 0.0%. Univariate and multivariate analyses of epidemiological and demographical information revealed an increased rate of B. elizabethae seropositivity in blood donors working outdoors, being out in the wild a minimum of once a week, hunting moose, having cat contact, and travelling to Eastern Europe. Living in the southern region of Sweden (Lund area) was associated with decreased seropositivity to B. elizabethae.

Keywords
Animals, Antibodies; Bacterial/*blood, Bartonella/classification/*immunology, Bartonella Infections/*epidemiology/immunology, Bartonella henselae/immunology, Blood Donors, Cats, Cattle, Cricetinae, Dogs, Female, Humans, Male, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Risk Factors, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Sweden/epidemiology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-75484 (URN)10.1080/00365540510012152 (DOI)16191889 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-04-20 Created: 2008-04-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
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