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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Thorvald, P., Lindblom, J. & Andreasson, R. (2019). On the development of a method for cognitive load assessment in manufacturing. Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, 59, 252-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the development of a method for cognitive load assessment in manufacturing
2019 (English)In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 59, p. 252-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390370 (URN)10.1016/j.rcim.2019.04.012 (DOI)000472694400022 ()
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, R., Arweström Jansson, A. & Lindblom, J. (2019). Past and future challenges for railway research and the role of a systems perspective. In: Proc. 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association: Volume VII. Paper presented at IEA 2018, August 26–30, Florence, Italy (pp. 1737-1746). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Past and future challenges for railway research and the role of a systems perspective
2019 (English)In: Proc. 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association: Volume VII, Springer, 2019, p. 1737-1746Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Operational train traffic is dependent on an efficient traffic plan monitored and executed by the traffic controllers, the proficient maneuvering of the trains by the train drivers, and on the interaction, communication, and coordination between these two work roles. The railway research community, and the branch of industry itself, has called for an integrated systems perspective for the whole train traffic system to achieve an efficient performance. As human-human and human-technology interactions are natural parts of the socio-technical system of train traffic, the aim of this paper is to provide illustrative examples for why a systems perspective is needed for the future of railway research. Furthermore, we present the theoretical framework of distributed cognition (DCog) as a necessary addition to the theoretical and methodological toolbox of the Human Factors and Ergonomics (HF&E) discipline. To realize efficient and coordinated processes involved in organizing and executing operational train traffic, the paper proposes that the DCog framework should be implemented in the train traffic domain as a viable approach forward.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357, E-ISSN 2194-5365 ; 824
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364089 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-96071-5_178 (DOI)000473061800167 ()2-s2.0-85052309815 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-96070-8 (ISBN)
Conference
IEA 2018, August 26–30, Florence, Italy
Available from: 2018-08-11 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, R., Alenljung, B., Billing, E. & Lowe, R. (2018). Affective touch in human–robot interaction: Conveying emotion to the Nao robot. International Journal of Social Robotics, 10, 473-491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affective touch in human–robot interaction: Conveying emotion to the Nao robot
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 10, p. 473-491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Affective touch has a fundamental role in human development, social bonding, and for providing emotional support in interpersonal relationships. We present, what is to our knowledge, the first HRI study of tactile conveyance of both positive and negative emotions (affective touch) on the Nao robot, and based on an experimental set-up from a study of human–human tactile communication. In the present work, participants conveyed eight emotions to a small humanoid robot via touch. We found that female participants conveyed emotions for a longer time, using more varied interaction and touching more regions on the robot’s body, compared to male participants. Several differences between emotions were found such that emotions could be classified by the valence of the emotion conveyed, by combining touch amount and duration. Overall, these results show high agreement with those reported for human–human affective tactile communication and could also have impact on the design and placement of tactile sensors on humanoid robots.

National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335361 (URN)10.1007/s12369-017-0446-3 (DOI)000445226600007 ()
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Lowe, R., Andreasson, R., Alenljung, B., Lund, A. & Billing, E. (2018). Designing for a wearable affective interface for the NAO robot: A study of emotion conveyance by touch. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, 2(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for a wearable affective interface for the NAO robot: A study of emotion conveyance by touch
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2018 (English)In: Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, ISSN 2414-4088, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348035 (URN)10.3390/mti2010002 (DOI)
Projects
Design, textil och hållbar utveckling
Available from: 2018-01-20 Created: 2018-04-10 Last updated: 2018-04-10Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, R., Jansson, A. & Lindblom, J. (2018). The coordination between train traffic controllers and train drivers: a distributed cognition perspective on railway. Cognition, Technology & Work, 1-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The coordination between train traffic controllers and train drivers: a distributed cognition perspective on railway
2018 (English)In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Although there has long been a call for a holistic systems perspective to better understand real work in the complex domain of railway traffic, prior research has not strongly emphasised the socio-technical perspective. In operational railway traffic, the successful planning and execution of the traffic are the product of the socio-technical system comprised by both train drivers and traffic controllers. This paper presents a study inspired by cognitive ethnography with the aim to characterise the coordinating activities that are conducted by train traffic controllers and train drivers in the work practices of the socio-technical system of Swedish railway. The theoretical framework of distributed cognition (DCog) is used as a conceptual and analytical tool to make sense of the complex railway domain and the best practices as they are developed and performed “in the wild”. The analysis reveals a pattern of collaboration and coordination of actions among the workers and we introduce the concept of enacted actionable practices as a key concern for understanding how a successfully executed railway traffic emerges as a property of the socio-technical system. The implications for future railway research are briefly discussed.

Keywords
Distributed cognition, DCog, Railway, Rail human factors
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364088 (URN)10.1007/s10111-018-0513-z (DOI)2-s2.0-85051644932 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, R., Lindblom, J. & Thorvald, P. (2017). Tool use and collaborative work of dock assembly in practice. Production & Manufacturing Research, 5(1), 164-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tool use and collaborative work of dock assembly in practice
2017 (English)In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 164-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to deepen the understanding of the intrinsic interactions and interplay between humans, tools, and environment from a systems perspective, research in the wild (RITW) approaches have gained traction during recent decades as they provide a higher ecological validity of findings. This paper presents a RITW study, investigating how assembly, in this case dock assembly of forwarders, was done in practice. As our theoretical foundation, we used the framework of distributed cognition, which is one of the main pillars of RITW. The findings are presented in narrative form, describing and highlighting that the workers achieve an efficient production outcome by being integral parts of the whole production process and doing so through coordination of activities benefitting the shared goal of the distributed socio-technical system.

Keywords
DCog, dock assembly, human factors & ergonomics, embodiment, tool use
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
User Centred Product Design; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333583 (URN)10.1080/21693277.2017.1374890 (DOI)000412286800003 ()2-s2.0-85029912768 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, R. & Arweström Jansson, A. (2017). Towards a distributed cognition perspective of the Swedish train traffic system. In: Proceedings of the 13th SweCog Conference: . Paper presented at SweCog 2017, October 26–27, Uppsala, Sweden (pp. 37-39). Högskolan i Skövde
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a distributed cognition perspective of the Swedish train traffic system
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 13th SweCog Conference, Högskolan i Skövde , 2017, p. 37-39Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Högskolan i Skövde, 2017
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335368 (URN)978-91-983667-2-3 (ISBN)
Conference
SweCog 2017, October 26–27, Uppsala, Sweden
Available from: 2017-11-10 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Alenljung, B., Lindblom, J., Andreasson, R. & Ziemke, T. (2017). User experience in social human–robot interaction. International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence (IJACI), 8(2), 12-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User experience in social human–robot interaction
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence (IJACI), ISSN 1941-6237, E-ISSN 1941-6245, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 12-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320941 (URN)10.4018/IJACI.2017040102 (DOI)000396727500002 ()
Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Alenljung, B., Andreasson, R., Billing, E. A., Lindblom, J. & Lowe, R. (2017). User Experience of Conveying Emotions by Touch. In: Proceedings of the 26th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN): . Paper presented at IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN) Lisbon, Portugal, Aug 28 - Sept 1, 2017 (pp. 1240-1247). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User Experience of Conveying Emotions by Touch
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 26th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), IEEE , 2017, p. 1240-1247Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the present study, 64 users were asked to convey eight distinct emotion to a humanoid Nao robot via touch, and were then asked to evaluate their experiences of performing that task. Large differences between emotions were revealed. Users perceived conveying of positive/pro-social emotions as significantly easier than negative emotions, with love and disgust as the two extremes. When asked whether they would act differently towards a human, compared to the robot, the users’ replies varied. A content analysis of interviews revealed a generally positive user experience (UX) while interacting with the robot, but users also found the task challenging in several ways. Three major themes with impact on the UX emerged; responsiveness, robustness, and trickiness. The results are discussed in relation to a study of human-human affective tactile interaction, with implications for human-robot interaction (HRI) and design of social and affective robotics in particular. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2017
National Category
Robotics
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333578 (URN)978-1-5386-3517-9 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN) Lisbon, Portugal, Aug 28 - Sept 1, 2017
Projects
Design, Textil och hållbar Utveckling (VGR)
Funder
Region Västra Götaland
Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2017-11-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0159-9628

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