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Mitchell, Don, Professor
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Mitchell, D. (2018). A New Urban Order: Transit Strikes, 1886-1895. In: Neil Smith and Don Mitchell (Ed.), Revolting NewYork: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City (pp. 114-121). Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Urban Order: Transit Strikes, 1886-1895
2018 (English)In: Revolting NewYork: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City / [ed] Neil Smith and Don Mitchell, Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press, 2018, p. 114-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Occupy Wall Street did not come from nowhere. It was part of a long history of riot, revolt, uprising, and sometimes even revolution that has shaped New York City. From the earliest European colonization to the present, New Yorkers have been revolting. Hard hitting, revealing, and insightful, Revolting New York tells the story of New York’s evolution through revolution, a story of near-continuous popular (and sometimes not-so-popular) uprising.

Richly illustrated with more than ninety historical and contemporary images, historical maps, and maps drawn especially for the book, Revolting New Yorkprovides the first comprehensive account of the historical geography of revolt in New York, from the earliest uprisings of the Munsee against the Dutch occupation of Manhattan in the seventeenth century to the Black Lives Matter movement and the unrest of the Trump era. Through this rich narrative, editors Neil Smith and Don Mitchell reveal a continuous, if varied and punctuated, history of rebellion in New York that is as vital as the more standard histories of formal politics, planning, economic growth, and restructuring that largely define our consciousness of New York’s story.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press, 2018
Series
Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation ; 38
Keywords
Riot, Rebellion, Uprising, Revolution, New York City
National Category
History
Research subject
Geography; History; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371913 (URN)978-0-8203-5281-7 (ISBN)978-0-8203-5282-4 (ISBN)978-0-8203-5280-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. (2018). Foradalmi vagy forradalomellenes-e a táj: A munka földrajza - küzdelem az életfeltételek átalaításáért Kalifornában. Eszmélet, 119, 200-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foradalmi vagy forradalomellenes-e a táj: A munka földrajza - küzdelem az életfeltételek átalaításáért Kalifornában
2018 (Hungarian)In: Eszmélet, ISSN 0865-2139, Vol. 119, p. 200-227Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Keywords
Landscape, Revolution, Migrant Labor, Agribusiness
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369548 (URN)
Note

Hungarian translation of Labour's Geography and Geography's Labour (2013)

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-01-30Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. (2018). Introduction: The Lightning Flash of Revolt. In: Neil Smith and Don Mitchell (Ed.), Revolting New York: how 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising, and Revolution Shaped a City (pp. 1-16). Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: The Lightning Flash of Revolt
2018 (English)In: Revolting New York: how 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising, and Revolution Shaped a City / [ed] Neil Smith and Don Mitchell, Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press, 2018, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Occupy Wall Street did not come from nowhere. It was part of a long history of riot, revolt, uprising, and sometimes even revolution that has shaped New York City. From the earliest European colonization to the present, New Yorkers have been revolting. Hard hitting, revealing, and insightful, Revolting New York tells the story of New York’s evolution through revolution, a story of near-continuous popular (and sometimes not-so-popular) uprising.

Richly illustrated with more than ninety historical and contemporary images, historical maps, and maps drawn especially for the book, Revolting New Yorkprovides the first comprehensive account of the historical geography of revolt in New York, from the earliest uprisings of the Munsee against the Dutch occupation of Manhattan in the seventeenth century to the Black Lives Matter movement and the unrest of the Trump era. Through this rich narrative, editors Neil Smith and Don Mitchell reveal a continuous, if varied and punctuated, history of rebellion in New York that is as vital as the more standard histories of formal politics, planning, economic growth, and restructuring that largely define our consciousness of New York’s story.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press, 2018
Series
Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation ; 38
Keywords
Riot, Rebellion, Uprising, Revolution, New York City
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
History; Geography; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371910 (URN)978-0-8203-5281-7 (ISBN)978-0-8203-5282-4 (ISBN)978-0-8203-5280-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. (Ed.). (2018). Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Revolt, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City (1ed.). Athens, USA: University of Georgia Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Revolt, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athens, USA: University of Georgia Press, 2018. p. 368 Edition: 1
Series
Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation
Keywords
Revolt, Revolution, Urban, Social Movements
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368807 (URN)978-0-8203-5282-4 (ISBN)978-0-8203-5281-7 (ISBN)978-0-8203-5280-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. & Smith, N. (2018). Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City. Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Occupy Wall Street did not come from nowhere. It was part of a long history of riot, revolt, uprising, and sometimes even revolution that has shaped New York City. From the earliest European colonization to the present, New Yorkers have been revolting. Hard hitting, revealing, and insightful, Revolting New York tells the story of New York’s evolution through revolution, a story of near-continuous popular (and sometimes not-so-popular) uprising.

Richly illustrated with more than ninety historical and contemporary images, historical maps, and maps drawn especially for the book, Revolting New York provides the first comprehensive account of the historical geography of revolt in New York, from the earliest uprisings of the Munsee against the Dutch occupation of Manhattan in the seventeenth century to the Black Lives Matter movement and the unrest of the Trump era. Through this rich narrative, editors Neil Smith and Don Mitchell reveal a continuous, if varied and punctuated, history of rebellion in New York that is as vital as the more standard histories of formal politics, planning, economic growth, and restructuring that largely define our consciousness of New York’s story.

Contributors: Marnie Brady, Kathleen Dunn, Zultán Gluck, Rachel Goffe, Harmony Goldberg, Amanda Huron, Malav Kanuga, Esteban Kelly, Manissa McCleave Maharawal, Don Mitchell, Justin Sean Myers, Brendan P. O’Malley, Raymond Pettit, Miguelina Rodriguez, Jenjoy Roybal, McNair Scott, Erin Siodmak, Neil Smith, Peter Waldman, and Nicole Watson

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athens, GA, USA: University of Georgia Press, 2018. p. 348
Series
Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation ; 38
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361783 (URN)978-0-8203-5282-4 (ISBN)978-0-8203-5280-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. (2018). Revolution and the critique of human geography: prospects for the right to the city after 50 years. Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, 100(1), 2-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revolution and the critique of human geography: prospects for the right to the city after 50 years
2018 (English)In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 2-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is a slightly revised version of the 2017 Geografiska Annaler B Lecture, which I gave at the Nordic Geography Meeting in Stockholm. It seeks to show why Guy Debord's ([(1967) 1994]. The Society of the Spectacle. Translated by David Nicholson-Smith. NewYork: Zone Books.) is just as important now as it was when it was published 50 years ago - not just politically, but also analytically. To do so, I develop an argument Debord only made in passing: that we live in a world governed by a falling rate of use value. Through this development, I suggest some ways to think about the right to the city - and revolution - in our current moment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
Falling rate of use value, Guy Debord, Henri Lefebvre, right to the city, society of the spectacle
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351768 (URN)10.1080/04353684.2018.1445478 (DOI)000429097000002 ()
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Hansson, E. & Mitchell, D. (2018). The Exceptional State of “Roma Beggars” in Sweden. European Journal of Homelessness, 12(2), 15-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Exceptional State of “Roma Beggars” in Sweden
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Homelessness, ISSN 2030-2762, E-ISSN 2030-3106, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 15-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Across Europe, social-democratic, liberal democracies have become host to growing numbers of impoverished EU migrants (often called “Roma beggars”) who seem to pose a challenge to the tenets of egalitarianism and social protection that are the foundation of the welfare state. Sweden is no exception. Nor has it been exceptional in its response: creating what can be described as a “state of exception” for homeless, impoverished EU migrants wherein they are afforded fewer rights, and almost no access to care, compared to other migrants to the country (such as refugees and asylum seekers). In this paper we examine the nature of this “state of exception” – and consequent denial of rights for poor and homeless EU migrants – and how it has been justified by invoking the inherent fairness of the Swedish system. We do so by reviewing, but especially extending, the Italian philosopher Georgio Agamben’s concepts of state (and space) of exception, bare life, and homo sacer to describe the way homeless EU migrants are understood and treated in Sweden, and then by carefully examining the major policy statement on the matter, the “Valfridsson Report,” which was written to harmonize practices across Swedish jurisdictions while providing the legal basis for making an exception of impoverished EU migrants, and which is now being implemented in law. 

Keywords
Bare Life, Begging, Homelessness, Roma/Romani, State of Exception, Sweden, Vulnerable EU Citizens
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360075 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. (2018). The Right to the City: Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space. Beijing: Soochow University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Right to the City: Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space
2018 (Chinese)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Beijing: Soochow University Press, 2018. p. 253
Keywords
Public Space, Protest, Homelessness, Geographyof Law
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369538 (URN)978-7-5672-1956-4 (ISBN)
Note

Chinese Translation of The Right to the City (2003)

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-03-21Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. (2017). A relational approach to landscape and urbanism: the view from an exclusive suburb. Landscape research, 42(3), 277-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A relational approach to landscape and urbanism: the view from an exclusive suburb
2017 (English)In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper promotes a relational (that is, dialectical view) of landscape urbanism through the examination of an exclusive, racialised Northern California suburb as it has developed in relationship toand cocooned itself from the problems and disamenities ofthe broader urban region. Through the case of the wealthy, mostly white town of Moraga, it suggests that landscape studies must be attentive to the larger regional dynamics that produce and reproduce specific places. The argument is both intellectual and political: to the degree that the recent turn to discourses of and practices concerning the right to landscape' are inattentive to how landscapes are produced, unjustly, through their regional others, then to that degree the right to landscape threatens to reproduce injustice, not overcome it. Thus, the paper argues that any discourse and struggle for the right to landscape must be conjoined with a struggle for the right to the city. It suggests that the right question to ask of the landscape is not so much whose landscape' (as much work on the right to landscape has it), but landscape for whom.'

Keywords
Elite suburb, landscape urbanism, right to landscape, right to the city
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321435 (URN)10.1080/01426397.2016.1267129 (DOI)000398190600004 ()
Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2017-05-09Bibliographically approved
Mitchell, D. (2017). Afterword: Landscape's Agency. In: Ed Wall; Tim Waterman (Ed.), Landscape and Agency: Critican Essays (pp. 188-192). Abingdon, UK: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Afterword: Landscape's Agency
2017 (English)In: Landscape and Agency: Critican Essays / [ed] Ed Wall; Tim Waterman, Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2017, p. 188-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Landscape, Justice
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369553 (URN)9781138125575 (ISBN)9781138125568 (ISBN)9781315647401 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
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