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Boersma, Greta J.
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Katsogiannos, P., Kamble, P. G., Boersma, G. J., Karlsson, F. A., Lundkvist, P., Sundbom, M., . . . Eriksson, J. (2019). Early Changes in Adipose Tissue Morphology, Gene Expression, and Metabolism After RYGB in Patients With Obesity and T2D. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 104(7), 2601-2613
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Changes in Adipose Tissue Morphology, Gene Expression, and Metabolism After RYGB in Patients With Obesity and T2D
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 104, no 7, p. 2601-2613Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery effectively prevents or treats type 2 diabetes (T2D). Adipose tissue (AT) mechanisms may be of importance.

Objective: To assess the relationship between early changes in whole-body and AT metabolism in surgically treated patients with T2D.

Design and Setting: A randomized single-center study.

Patients: Nineteen patients with T2D with body mass index 30 to 45 kg/m(2).

Interventions: Thirteen patients were assessed at baseline and 4 and 24 weeks after RYGB (preceded by a 4-week low-calorie diet) and compared with 6 control patients continuing standard medical treatment: oral glucose tolerance test, subcutaneous AT biopsies for gene expression, adipocyte size, glucose uptake, lipolysis, and insulin action.

Results: At 4 and 24 weeks post-RYGB, all patients but one had stopped diabetes medication. Fasting glucose, HbA(1c), and insulin levels decreased and the Matsuda index increased compared with baseline (P < 0.01 for all), indicating improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. Mean adipocyte size significantly reduced, more at 4 than at 24 weeks; at 4 weeks, glucose uptake per adipocyte was lowered, and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis tended to increase, whereas the fold insulin effects on glucose uptake and lipolysis were unchanged. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, CPT1b and adiponectin, was increased at 4 weeks, whereas leptin and E2F1 (involved in cell proliferation) were reduced (P < 0.05 for all).

Conclusion: Glycemic control and in vivo insulin sensitivity improved 4 weeks after RYGB, but adipocyte insulin sensitivity did not change despite a marked reduction in adipocyte size. Thus, mechanisms for a rapid improvement of T2D after RYGB may occur mainly in other tissues than adipose.

National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390982 (URN)10.1210/jc.2018-02165 (DOI)000474806300015 ()30689903 (PubMedID)
Funder
EXODIAB - Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden
Available from: 2019-08-19 Created: 2019-08-19 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Boersma, G. J., Johansson, E., Pereira, M. J., Heurling, K., Skrtic, S., Lau, J., . . . Eriksson, J. (2018). Altered Glucose Uptake in Muscle, Visceral Adipose Tissue, and Brain Predict Whole-Body Insulin Resistance and may Contribute to the Development of Type 2 Diabetes: A Combined PET/MR Study. Hormone and Metabolic Research, 50(8), 627-639
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered Glucose Uptake in Muscle, Visceral Adipose Tissue, and Brain Predict Whole-Body Insulin Resistance and may Contribute to the Development of Type 2 Diabetes: A Combined PET/MR Study
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2018 (English)In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 627-639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We assessed glucose uptake in different tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2D), prediabetes, and control subjects to elucidate its impact in the development of whole-body insulin resistance and T2D. Thirteen T2D, 12 prediabetes, and 10 control subjects, matched for age and BMI, underwent OGTT and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) biopsies. Integrated whole-body 18F-FDG PET and MRI were performed during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp to asses glucose uptake rate (MRglu) in several tissues. MRglu in skeletal muscle, SAT, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and liver was significantly reduced in T2D subjects and correlated positively with M-values (r=0.884, r=0.574, r=0.707 and r=0.403, respectively). Brain MRglu was significantly higher in T2D and prediabetes subjects and had a significant inverse correlation with M-values (r=-0.616). Myocardial MRglu did not differ between groups and did not correlate with the M-values. A multivariate model including skeletal muscle, brain and VAT MRglu best predicted the M-values (adjusted r2=0.85). In addition, SAT MRglu correlated with SAT glucose uptake ex vivo (r=0.491). In different stages of the development of T2D, glucose uptake during hyperinsulinemia is elevated in the brain in parallel with an impairment in peripheral organs. Impaired glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and VAT together with elevated glucose uptake in brain were independently associated with whole-body insulin resistance, and these tissue-specific alterations may contribute to T2D development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Georg Thieme Verlag KG, 2018
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356788 (URN)10.1055/a-0643-4739 (DOI)000440872200007 ()30001566 (PubMedID)
Funder
AstraZenecaEXODIAB - Excellence of Diabetes Research in SwedenSwedish Diabetes AssociationSwedish Research CouncilErnfors Foundation
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved
Pereira, M. J., Boersma, G. J., Kamble, P. G., Lundkvist, P., Almby, K. E. & Eriksson, J. (2018). Direct effects of glucagon on human adipose tissue metabolism. Paper presented at 54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY. Diabetologia, 61, S245-S246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct effects of glucagon on human adipose tissue metabolism
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2018 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 61, p. S245-S246Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367132 (URN)000443556003092 ()
Conference
54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY
Funder
Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Swedish Diabetes Association
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Kamble, P. G., Pereira, M. J., Boersma, G. J., Almby, K. E. & Eriksson, J. W. (2018). Estrogen and glucocorticoid effects on lipocalin 2 expression in human adipose tissue: A role of ER beta pathway in insulin resistance?. Paper presented at 54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY. Diabetologia, 61, S289-S289
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estrogen and glucocorticoid effects on lipocalin 2 expression in human adipose tissue: A role of ER beta pathway in insulin resistance?
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2018 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 61, p. S289-S289Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367126 (URN)000443556003189 ()
Conference
54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Sidibeh, C. O., Pereira, M. J., Abalo, X., Boersma, G. J., Skrtic, S., Lundkvist, P., . . . Eriksson, J. (2018). FKBP5 expression in human adipose tissue: potential role in glucose and lipid metabolism, adipogenesis and type 2 diabetes. Endocrine (Basingstoke), 62(1), 116-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FKBP5 expression in human adipose tissue: potential role in glucose and lipid metabolism, adipogenesis and type 2 diabetes
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2018 (English)In: Endocrine (Basingstoke), ISSN 1355-008X, E-ISSN 1559-0100, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 116-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Here, we explore the involvement of FKBP51 in glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance (IR) in human subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), including its potential role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moreover, we assess the metabolic effects of reducing the activity of FKBP51 using the specific inhibitor SAFit1. Methods Human SAT was obtained by needle biopsies of the lower abdominal region. FKBP5 gene expression was assessed in fresh SAT explants from a cohort of 20 T2D subjects group-wise matched by gender, age and BMI to 20 nondiabetic subjects. In addition, human SAT was obtained from non-diabetic volunteers (20F/9M). SAT was incubated for 24 h with or without the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone and SAFit1. Incubated SAT was used to measure the glucose uptake rate in isolated adipocytes. Results FKBP5 gene expression levels in SAT positively correlated with several indices of IR as well as glucose area under the curve during oral glucose tolerance test (r = 0.33, p < 0.05). FKBP5 gene expression levels tended to be higher in T2D subjects compared to non-diabetic subjects (p = 0.088). Moreover, FKBP5 gene expression levels were found to inversely correlate with lipolytic, lipogenic and adipogenic genes. SAFit1 partly prevented the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on glucose uptake. Conclusions FKBP5 gene expression in human SAT tends to be increased in T2D subjects and is related to elevated glucose levels. Moreover, FKBP5 gene expression is inversely associated with the expression of lipolytic, lipogenic and adipogenic genes. SAFit1 can partly prevent glucose uptake impairment by glucocorticoids, suggesting that FKBP51 might be a key factor in glucocorticoid-induced IR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Type 2 diabetes, Glucocorticoids, Insulin resistance, Adipose tissue, FKBP51, SAFit1
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363413 (URN)10.1007/s12020-018-1674-5 (DOI)000445383900014 ()30032404 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Diabetes AssociationEXODIAB - Excellence of Diabetes Research in SwedenErnfors FoundationSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)AstraZeneca
Available from: 2018-10-19 Created: 2018-10-19 Last updated: 2018-10-19Bibliographically approved
Chawla, A., Cordner, Z. A., Boersma, G. J. & Moran, T. H. (2017). Cognitive impairment and gene expression alterations in a rodent model of binge eating disorder. Physiology and Behavior, 180, 78-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive impairment and gene expression alterations in a rodent model of binge eating disorder
2017 (English)In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 180, p. 78-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Binge eating disorder (BED) is defined as recurrent, distressing over-consumption of palatable food (PF) in a short time period. Clinical studies suggest that individuals with BED may have impairments in cognitive processes, executive functioning, impulse control, and decision-making, which may play a role in sustaining binge eating behavior. These clinical reports, however, are limited and often conflicting. In this study, we used a limited access rat model of binge-like behavior in order to further explore the effects of binge eating on cognition. In binge eating prone (BEP) rats, we found novel object recognition (NOR) as well as Barnes maze reversal learning (BM-RL) deficits. Aberrant gene expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) in the hippocampus (HPC)-prefrontal cortex (PFC) network was observed in BEP rats. Additionally, the NOR deficits were correlated with reductions in the expression of TrkB and insulin receptor (Ir) in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Furthermore, up-regulation of serotonin-2C (5-HT2C) receptors in the orbitoprefrontal cortex (OFC) was associated with BM-RL deficit. Finally, in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), we found decreased dopamine receptor 2 (Drd2) expression among BEP rats. Taken together, these data suggest that binge eating vegetable shortening may induce contextual and reversal learning deficits which may be mediated, at least in part, by the altered expression of genes in the CA3-OFC-NAc neural network.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2017
Keywords
Binge eating, High fat, Cognition, Bdnf, TrkB, Serotonin receptor
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337330 (URN)10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.08.004 (DOI)000412259500011 ()28821448 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-02Bibliographically approved
Katsogiannos, P., Boersma, G. J., Pereira, M. J., Lundkvist, P., Sundbom, M. & Eriksson, J. W. (2017). Glucose homeostasis and whole-body insulin resistance improved 4 weeks after gastric bypass surgery in type 2 diabetes, whereas adipose tissue metabolism was unchanged. Paper presented at 53rd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 11-15, 2017, Lisbon, PORTUGAL. Diabetologia, 60(S1), S253-S254, Article ID 557.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glucose homeostasis and whole-body insulin resistance improved 4 weeks after gastric bypass surgery in type 2 diabetes, whereas adipose tissue metabolism was unchanged
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2017 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, no S1, p. S253-S254, article id 557Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347288 (URN)000408315001334 ()
Conference
53rd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 11-15, 2017, Lisbon, PORTUGAL
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Boersma, G. J., Heurling, K., Pereira, M. J., Johansson, E., Lubberink, M., Lau Börjesson, J., . . . Eriksson, J. W. (2017). Glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, brain and visceral adipose tissue assessed with PET/MR strongly predicts whole body glucose uptake during hyperinsulinaemia. Paper presented at 53rd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 11-15, 2017, Lisbon, PORTUGAL. Diabetologia, 60, S80-S80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, brain and visceral adipose tissue assessed with PET/MR strongly predicts whole body glucose uptake during hyperinsulinaemia
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2017 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, p. S80-S80Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346985 (URN)000408315000170 ()
Conference
53rd Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), SEP 11-15, 2017, Lisbon, PORTUGAL
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Evers, S. S., Boersma, G. J., Tamashiro, K. L. K., Scheurink, A. J. W. & van Dijk, G. (2017). Roman high and low avoidance rats differ in their response to chronic olanzapine treatment at the level of body weight regulation, glucose homeostasis, and cortico-mesolimbic gene expression. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 31(11), 1437-1452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roman high and low avoidance rats differ in their response to chronic olanzapine treatment at the level of body weight regulation, glucose homeostasis, and cortico-mesolimbic gene expression
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0269-8811, E-ISSN 1461-7285, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 1437-1452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent mainly used for treating schizophrenia, is frequently associated with body weight gain and diabetes mellitus. Nonetheless, studies have shown that not every individual is equally susceptible to olanzapine's weight-gaining effect. Therefore, Roman high and low avoidance rat strains were examined on their responsiveness to olanzapine treatment. The Roman high avoidance rat shares many behavioral and physiological characteristics with human schizophrenia, such as increased central dopaminergic sensitivity, whereas the Roman low avoidance rat has been shown to be prone to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. The data revealed that only the Roman high avoidance rats are susceptible to olanzapine-induced weight gain and attenuated glucose tolerance. Here it is suggested that the specific olanzapine-induced weight gain in Roman high avoidance rats could be related to augmented dopaminergic sensitivity at baseline through increased expression of prefrontal cortex dopamine receptor D1 mRNA and nucleus accumbens dopamine receptor D2 mRNA expression. Regression analyses revealed that olanzapine-induced weight gain in the Roman high avoidance rat is above all related to increased prolactin levels, whereas changes in glucose homeostasis is best explained by differences in central dopaminergic receptor expressions between strains and treatment. Our data indicates that individual differences in dopaminergic receptor expression in the cortico-mesolimbic system are related to susceptibility to olanzapine-induced weight gain.

Keywords
Roman high, low avoidance, olanzapine, dopamine, prolactin, obesity
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342908 (URN)10.1177/0269881117724749 (DOI)000416021800006 ()28892416 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-03-02Bibliographically approved
Boersma, G. J., Smeltzer, M. D., Scott, K. A., Scheurink, A. J., Tamashiro, K. L. & Sakai, R. R. (2017). Stress coping style does not determine social status, but influences the consequences of social subordination stress. Physiology and Behavior, 178, 126-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress coping style does not determine social status, but influences the consequences of social subordination stress
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2017 (English)In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 178, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic stress exposure may have negative consequences for health. One of the most common sources of chronic stress is stress associated with social interaction. In rodents, the effects of social stress can be studied in a naturalistic way using the visual burrow system (VBS). The way an individual copes with stress, their "stress coping style", may influence the consequences of social stress. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that stress coping style may modulate social status and influence the consequences of having a lower social status. We formed 7 VBS colonies, with 1 proactive coping male, 1 passive coping male, and 4 female rats per colony to assess whether a rat's coping style prior to colony formation could predict whether that individual is more likely to become socially dominant. The rats remained in their respective colonies for 14 days and the physiological and behavioral consequences of social stress were assessed. Our study shows that stress coping style does not predict social status. However, stress coping style may influence the consequences of having a lower social status. Subordinate passive and proactive rats had distinctly different wound patterns; proactive rats had more wounds on the front of their bodies. Behavioral analysis confirmed that proactive subordinate rats engaged in more offensive interactions. Furthermore, subordinate rats with a proactive stress coping style had larger adrenals, and increased stress responsivity to a novel acute stressor (restraint stress) compared to passive subordinate rats or dominant rats, suggesting that the allostatic load may have been larger in this group. (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334929 (URN)10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.12.041 (DOI)000407538400017 ()28069459 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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