uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eriksson, Staffan
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Alexandersson, M., Wang, E.-H. Y. & Eriksson, S. (2019). A small difference in recovery between total knee arthroplasty with and without tourniquet use the first 3 months after surgery: a randomized controlled study. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 27(4), 1035-1042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A small difference in recovery between total knee arthroplasty with and without tourniquet use the first 3 months after surgery: a randomized controlled study
2019 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1035-1042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: When a tourniquet is used during surgery on the extremities, the pressure applied to the muscles, nerves and blood vessels can cause neuromuscular damage that contributes to postoperative weakness. The hypothesis was that the rehabilitation-related results would be improved if total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is performed without the use of a tourniquet.

Methods: 81 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who underwent TKA surgery were randomized to surgery with or without tourniquet. Active flexion and extension of the knee, pain by visual analog scale (VAS), swelling by knee circumference, quadriceps function by straight leg raise, and timed up and go (TUG) test results were measured before and up to 3 months after surgery.

Results: ANCOVA revealed no between-groups effect for flexion of the knee at day 3 postsurgery. Compared with the tourniquet group, the nontourniquet group experienced elevated pain at 24 h, with a mean difference of 16.6 mm, p = 0.005. The effect on mobility (TUG test) at 3 months was better in the nontourniquet group, with a mean difference of -1.1 s, p = 0.029.

Conclusions: The hypothesis that the rehabilitation-related results would be improved without a tourniquet is not supported by the results. When the results in this study for surgery performed with and without tourniquet are compared, no clear benefit for either procedure was observed, as the more pain exhibited by the nontourniquet group was only evident for a short period and the improved mobility in this group was not at a clinically relevant level.

Keywords
Rehabilitation, Surgery, Total knee arthroplasty, Tourniquet
National Category
Surgery Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-374017 (URN)10.1007/s00167-018-5196-8 (DOI)000462637500005 ()30328495 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved
Arkkukangas, M., Söderlund, A., Eriksson, S. & Johansson, A.-C. (2019). Fall Preventive Exercise With or Without Behavior Change Support for Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Short-Term Follow-up. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, 42(1), 9-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fall Preventive Exercise With or Without Behavior Change Support for Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Short-Term Follow-up
2019 (English)In: Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, ISSN 1539-8412, E-ISSN 2152-0895, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In Western countries, falls and fall-related injuries are a well-known threat to health in the aging population. Studies indicate that regular exercise improves strength and balance and can therefore decrease the incidence of falls and fall-related injuries. The challenge, however, is to provide exercise programs that are safe, effective, and attractive to the older population. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of a home-based exercise program with or without motivational interviewing (MI) compared with standard care on physical performance, fall self-efficacy, balance, activity level, handgrip strength, adherence to the exercise, and fall frequency.

METHOD: A total of 175 older adults participated in this randomized controlled study. They were randomly allocated for the Otago Exercise Program (OEP) (n = 61), OEP combined with MI (n = 58), or a control group (n = 56). The participants' mean age was 83 years. The recruitment period was from October 2012 to May 2015. Measurements of physical performance, fall self-efficacy, balance, activity level, handgrip strength, adherence to the exercise, and fall frequency were done before and 12 weeks after randomization.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: A total of 161 participants were followed up, and there were no significant differences between groups after a period of 12 weeks of regular exercise. Within the OEP + MI group, physical performance, fall self-efficacy, physical activity level, and handgrip strength improved significantly; likewise, improved physical performance and fall self-efficacy were found in the control group. A corresponding difference did not occur in the OEP group. Adherence to the exercise was generally high in both exercise groups.

CONCLUSION: In the short-term perspective, there were no benefits of an exercise program with or without MI regarding physical performance, fall self-efficacy, activity level, handgrip strength, adherence to the exercise, and fall frequency in comparison to a control group. However, some small effects occurred within the OEP + MI group, indicating that there may be some possible value in behavioral change support combined with exercise in older adults that requires further evaluation in both short- and long-term studies.

National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342495 (URN)10.1519/JPT.0000000000000129 (DOI)000457564600002 ()28244890 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare
Available from: 2018-02-21 Created: 2018-02-21 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Arkkukangas, M., Söderlund, A., Eriksson, S. & Johansson, A.-C. (2018). One-Year Adherence to the Otago Exercise Programme with or Without Motivational Interviewing In Community-Dwelling Older People. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 26(3), 390-395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-Year Adherence to the Otago Exercise Programme with or Without Motivational Interviewing In Community-Dwelling Older People
2018 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, E-ISSN 1543-267X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 390-395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated if behavioral factors, treatment with behavioral support, readiness to change, fall self-efficacy and activity habits could predict long-term adherence to an exercise program. Included in this study were 114 community-dwelling older people who had participated in one of two home-based exercise interventions. Behavioral factors associated with adherence to the exercise program over 52 weeks were analyzed. The behavioral factors, specifically activity habits at baseline, significant predicted adherence to the exercise program, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.39 and 95% CI = 1.38-8.32 for exercise and an OR of 6.11 and 95% CI = 2.34-15.94 for walks. Being allocated to a specific treatment including motivational interviewing (MI) was also significantly predictive: OR = 2.47 and 95% CI = 1.11-5.49 for exercise adherence. In conclusion, activity habits and exercise in combination with MI had a significant association with adherence to the exercise program at a one-year follow up.

Keywords
motivational interviewing, older adults, physical activity
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342494 (URN)10.1123/japa.2017-0009 (DOI)000441464400005 ()28952864 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-21 Created: 2018-02-21 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Vahlberg, B., Holmbäck, U., Eriksson, S. & Cederholm, T. (2018). Protocol and pilot study of a short message service-guided training after acute stroke/transient ischemic attack to increase walking capacity and physical activity. Preventive medicine reports, 11, 109-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protocol and pilot study of a short message service-guided training after acute stroke/transient ischemic attack to increase walking capacity and physical activity
2018 (English)In: Preventive medicine reports, ISSN 2211-3355, Vol. 11, p. 109-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity in community-living individuals after a stroke is usually scarce. This protocol describes a study that will evaluate a method to increase physical activity by performing a 3-month outdoor walking and muscle strengthening program and will examine the 3-month and 1-year effects of this program on individuals with acute stroke (AS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA). In a prospective randomized controlled trial in Uppsala, Sweden, 80 individuals with AS or TIA who maintained cognitive and motor function will be randomized into groups for continuous training for three months or for regular standard care. The training will be supervised by daily cellphone-delivered messages (short message services; SMS), and the intensity, duration and workload will be gradually increased. The primary outcome is a change in walking capacity according to the 6-Minute Walk Test and chair-rising at three months. Secondary outcomes include mobility, gait speed, handgrip strength, body composition (fat mass and muscle mass), biochemical risk-markers, health-related quality of life, and cardiovascular events. Adherence to the training program will be documented with a self-reported diary and step counts over two weeks. The major study started in November 2016, and results are expected in 2019. In a pilot study of 15 subjects post-stroke (mean-age 65 years), we observed improved walking capacity (increasing from 23 to 255 m) and chair-rising (decreasing 2.42 s) from baseline to three months. SMS-guided outdoor training will be tested as a potential therapeutic strategy to increase physical activity and thereby improve walking capacity and physical function following a stroke.

Keywords
Acute stroke, Body composition, Mobility, Physical activity, Transient ischemic attack, Walking capacity
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362343 (URN)10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.05.016 (DOI)30023162 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Arkkukangas, M., Sundler, A. J., Söderlund, A., Eriksson, S. & Johansson, A.-C. (2017). Older persons' experiences of a home-based exercise program with behavioral change support. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 33(12), 905-913
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older persons' experiences of a home-based exercise program with behavioral change support
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 905-913Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: It is a challenge to promote exercise among older persons. Knowledge is needed regarding the maintenance of exercise aiming at preventing falls and promoting health and well-being in older persons.

PURPOSE: This descriptive study used a qualitative inductive approach to describe older persons' experiences of a fall-preventive, home-based exercise program with support for behavioral change.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 elderly persons aged 75 years or older, and a qualitative content analysis was performed.

RESULTS: Four categories emerged: facilitators of performing exercise in everyday life, the importance of support, perceived gains from exercise, and the existential aspects of exercise.

CONCLUSION: With support from physiotherapists (PTs), home-based exercise can be adapted to individual circumstances in a meaningful way. Including exercises in everyday life and daily routines could support the experience of being stronger, result in better physical functioning, and give hope for an extended active life in old age.

Keywords
Community-living, Otago exercise program, motivational interviewing, older persons
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342496 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2017.1359869 (DOI)000416020200002 ()28812402 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-21 Created: 2018-02-21 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications