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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Bernhard-Oettel, C., Eib, C., Griep, Y. & Leineweber, C. (2019). How do job insecurity and organizational justice relate to depressive symptoms and sleep difficulties: a multilevel study on immediate and prolonged effects in swedish workers. Psychologie Appliquee: Revue Internationale
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do job insecurity and organizational justice relate to depressive symptoms and sleep difficulties: a multilevel study on immediate and prolonged effects in swedish workers
2019 (English)In: Psychologie Appliquee: Revue Internationale, ISSN 0269-994X, E-ISSN 1464-0597Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Drawing on stress and justice literature, we argue that perceptions of job insecurity induce feelings of low procedural justice, which has immediate and prolonged negative effects on health (depressive symptoms, sleep difficulties). Moreover, we explore whether the strength of the job insecurity–justice relationship differs between individuals as a function of their average level of job insecurity over time. Finally, we explore whether the procedural justice–health relationship differs between individuals as a function of variability in justice perceptions over time. We analyzed Swedish panel data from permanent workers over four consecutive waves (with a two‐year time lag between waves) using multilevel analysis, separating within‐ and between‐person variance. Results showed that job insecurity associated negatively with procedural justice at the same time point for all waves. Prolonged effects were less stable. We found immediate (but not prolonged) indirect effects of job insecurity on health outcomes via procedural justice. Average levels in job insecurity over time moderated the within‐person job insecurity–justice relationship. However, variability in procedural justice over time did not moderate the within‐person justice–health relationship. In conclusion, disentangling within‐ and between‐person variability of job insecurity and justice perceptions contributes to the understanding of health effects.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392934 (URN)10.1111/apps.12222 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Eib, C. & Siegert, S. (2019). Is Female Entrepreneurship Only Empowering for Single Women? Evidence from France and Germany. Social Sciences, 8(4), Article ID 128.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Female Entrepreneurship Only Empowering for Single Women? Evidence from France and Germany
2019 (English)In: Social Sciences, ISSN 2076-0760, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Entrepreneurship has been suggested as an alternative career model for women to gain economic empowerment while maintaining caring obligations. In this study, we investigate how gender and living situation affect entrepreneurs’ engagement in their business, home, well-being and business success in both France and Germany. Data from the European Social Survey were used, which included 470 French and 622 German self-employed people. For the French, women reported more working hours when living alone but there were no gender differences for the other living situations. For the Germans, there were no gender differences when the self-employed person lived alone; for the other living situations, men reported more working hours. Women reported working more household hours than men in both countries. There were no gender differences in life satisfaction for German self-employed people regardless of living situation; for the French, gender differences varied by living situation. Men reported more business success than women in both countries. Results suggest that self-employed people in Germany follow a traditional breadwinner model, whereas in France, self-employed women do more paid and unpaid work at the same time. In sum, entrepreneurship may only be empowering for self-employed women living alone.

Keywords
self-employment; female entrepreneurship; gender; France; Germany
National Category
Gender Studies Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382229 (URN)10.3390/socsci8040128 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Bujacz, A., Eib, C. & Toivanen, S. (2019). Not All Are Equal: A Latent Profile Analysis of Well-Being among the Self-Employed. Journal of Happiness Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Not All Are Equal: A Latent Profile Analysis of Well-Being among the Self-Employed
2019 (English)In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study uses a person-centered approach to distinguish between subpopulations of self-employed individuals using multidimensional well-being indicators. Data were obtained from European Social Survey including a sample of 3461 self-employed individuals from 29 European countries. The analysis has empirically identified six distinct profiles named ‘unhappy’, ‘languishing’, ‘happy’, ‘satisfied’, ‘passionate’, and ‘flourishing’. The profiles were associated with significant differences in well-being, health and work-related variables. The results highlight the heterogeneity of the self-employed population, and describe the complex—both hedonic and eudaimonic—character of the well-being concept in this population.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389531 (URN)10.1007/s10902-019-00147-1 (DOI)
Funder
The Karolinska Institutet's Research Foundation
Available from: 2019-07-17 Created: 2019-07-17 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Ogbonnaya, C., Gahan, P. & Eib, C. (2019). Recessionary changes at work and employee well-being: the protective roles of national- and workplace-level institutions. European journal of industrial relations, 25(4), 377-393
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recessionary changes at work and employee well-being: the protective roles of national- and workplace-level institutions
2019 (English)In: European journal of industrial relations, ISSN 0959-6801, E-ISSN 1461-7129, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 377-393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The recession that followed the 2008 financial crisis was characterised by major changes to employees’ experiences at work. This study investigates the potential adverse well-being effects of two of such changes: perceived organisational distress and job deterioration. The study also examines the extent to which two national-level institutions (employment protection legislation and collective bargaining coverage) and corresponding institutions at the workplace level (employment contract and union membership) may act as buffers against these effects. Using data from 21 European countries, we show that recessionary changes are associated with reduced psychological well-being and greater levels of work–nonwork interference among workers. Our analysis also supports the proposition that different national- and workplace-level institutions may act as buffers against adverse well-being outcomes.

Keywords
Europe, institutions, job deterioration, perceived organizational distress, recession, well-being
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371925 (URN)10.1177/0959680119830885 (DOI)000485940200006 ()
Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Etuknwa, A., Daniels, K. & Eib, C. (2019). Sustainable Return to Work: A Systematic Review Focusing on Personal and Social Factors. Journal of occupational rehabilitation, 29(4), 679-700
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Return to Work: A Systematic Review Focusing on Personal and Social Factors
2019 (English)In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 679-700Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the impact of important personal and social factors on sustainable return to work (RTW) after ill-health due musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and common mental disorders (CMDs) and to compare the effects of these personal and social factors across both conditions. Sustainable RTW is defined as a stable full-time or part-time RTW to either original or modified job for a period of at least 3 months without relapse or sickness absence re-occurrence.

Methods A literature search was conducted in 13 databases and 79 studies were selected for the review, of which the methodological design was graded as very high, high and low quality. 

Results The most consistent evidence for achieving sustainable RTW for both MSDs and CMDs was from support from line managers or supervisors and co-workers, positive attitude, self-efficacy, young age and higher education levels. Job crafting, economic status, length of absence and job contract/security showed promising results, but too few studies exist to draw definite conclusions. Results regarding gender were inconsistent. 

Conclusions This review demonstrates that a variety of personal and social factors have positive and negative influences on sustainable RTW. We suggest that the social environment and how it interrelates with personal factors like attitudes and self-efficacy should be studied in more detail in the future as the inter-relationship between these factors appears to impact positively on sustainable RTW outcomes. Areas for future research include more high-quality studies on job crafting, economic status/income, length of absence, job contract/security and gender.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389530 (URN)10.1007/s10926-019-09832-7 (DOI)000495099300004 ()30767151 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-07-17 Created: 2019-07-17 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Soenen, G., Eib, C. & Torrès, O. (2019). The cost of injustice: overall justice, emotional exhaustion, and performance among entrepreneurs: do founders fare better?. Small Business Economics, 53(2), 355-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The cost of injustice: overall justice, emotional exhaustion, and performance among entrepreneurs: do founders fare better?
2019 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 355-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we build on the allostatic load model, developed in stress research, to explore the impact of entrepreneurs’ overall justice perceptions on emotional exhaustion and firm performance. Results revealed that the relationship between overall justice and emotional exhaustion was mediated by rumination about work. Further, building on recent work by Baron et al. (Journal of Management, 42(3), 742–768, 2016), which highlighted that company founders have more resources to deal with stress, we hypothesized that the relationship between rumination about work and emotional exhaustion was moderated by whether the entrepreneur was the founder of the venture or not. Results revealed that indeed founders appeared to be immune to the consequences of rumination about work elicited by injustice at work, while non-founders suffered from it. Moreover, emotional exhaustion was related to the monthly firm performance. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Keywords
Entrepreneurs, Small businesses, Emotional exhaustion, Rumination, Founder
National Category
Applied Psychology Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351147 (URN)10.1007/s11187-018-0052-2 (DOI)000482385700004 ()
Available from: 2018-05-19 Created: 2018-05-19 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Sieverding, M., Eib, C., Neubauer, A. B. & Stahl, T. (2018). Can lifestyle preferences help explain the persistent gender gap in academia? The "mothers work less" hypothesis supported for German but not for U.S. early career researchers. PLoS ONE, 13(8), Article ID e0202728.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can lifestyle preferences help explain the persistent gender gap in academia? The "mothers work less" hypothesis supported for German but not for U.S. early career researchers
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0202728Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Do lifestyle preferences contribute to the remaining gender gap in higher positions in academia with highly qualified women-especially those with children-deliberately working fewer hours than men do? We tested the "mothers work less" hypothesis in two samples of early career researchers employed at universities in Germany (N = 202) and in the US (N = 197). Early career researchers in the US worked on average 6.3 hours more per week than researchers in Germany. In Germany, female early career researchers with children had drastically reduced work hours (around 8 hours per week) compared to male researchers with children and compared to female researchers without children, whereas we found no such effect for U.S. researchers. In addition, we asked how long respondents would ideally want to work (ideal work hours), and results revealed similar effects for ideal work hours. Results support the "mothers work less" hypothesis for German but not for U.S. early career researchers.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368318 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0202728 (DOI)000443001700023 ()30153285 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Eib, C. (2018). Editorial:: Fairness Perceptions at Work and Health – a complicated story. Journal of Health, Safety and Environment, 34(2), 87-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial:: Fairness Perceptions at Work and Health – a complicated story
2018 (English)In: Journal of Health, Safety and Environment, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 87-91Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389532 (URN)
Available from: 2019-07-17 Created: 2019-07-17 Last updated: 2019-10-18
Eib, C., Bernhard-Oettel, C., Magnusson Hanson, L. L. & Leineweber, C. (2018). Organizational justice and health: Studying mental preoccupation with work and social support as mediators for lagged and reversed relationships. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 23(4), 553-567
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizational justice and health: Studying mental preoccupation with work and social support as mediators for lagged and reversed relationships
2018 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, ISSN 1076-8998, E-ISSN 1939-1307, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 553-567Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organizational justice perceptions are considered a predictor of health and well-being. To date, empirical evidence about whether organizational justice perceptions predict health or health predicts organizational justice perceptions is mixed. Furthermore, the processes underlying these relationships are largely unknown. In this article, we study whether bidirectional relationships can be explained by 2 different mediation mechanisms. First, based on the allostatic load model, we suggest that the relationships between organizational justice perceptions and different health indicators are mediated through mental preoccupation with work. Second, based on the affective perception and affective reaction assumption, we investigate if the relationships between different health indicators and organizational justice perceptions are mediated by social support at work. Using a large-scale Swedish panel study (N = 3,236), we test the bidirectional mediating relationships between procedural justice perceptions and self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and sickness absence with a cross-lagged design with 3 waves of data. Significant lagged effects from procedural justice to health were found for models predicting depressive symptoms and sickness absence. Mental preoccupation with work was not found to mediate the longitudinal relationship between procedural justice perceptions and indicators of health. Significant lagged effects from health indicators to procedural justice were found for models involving self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and sickness absence. Social support mediated the longitudinal relationships between all 3 health indicators and procedural justice. Results are discussed in light of previous studies and implications for theory and practice are outlined. (PsycINFO Database Record

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2018
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351141 (URN)10.1037/ocp0000115 (DOI)000445691800008 ()29504778 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P13-0905:1Swedish Research Council, 2009-6192 2013-1645Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2005-0734 2009-1758
Available from: 2018-05-19 Created: 2018-05-19 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Eib, C. (2017). Does it matter if I’m treated fairly at work?. In: An Introduction to Work and Organizational Psychology: An International Perspective: . Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does it matter if I’m treated fairly at work?
2017 (English)In: An Introduction to Work and Organizational Psychology: An International Perspective, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368320 (URN)978-1-119-16802-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2019-10-18
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4921-4865

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