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Leong, K. S. W., McLay, J., Derraik, J. G. B., Gibb, S., Shackleton, N., Taylor, R. W., . . . Cutfield, W. S. (2020). Associations of Prenatal and Childhood Antibiotic Exposure With Obesity at Age 4 Years. JAMA NETWORK OPEN, 3(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations of Prenatal and Childhood Antibiotic Exposure With Obesity at Age 4 Years
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2020 (English)In: JAMA NETWORK OPEN, ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance Although antibiotics are associated with obesity in animal models, the evidence in humans is conflicting. Objective To assess whether antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and/or early childhood is associated with the development of childhood obesity, focusing particularly on siblings and twins. Design, Setting, and Participants This cross-sectional national study included 284 & x202f;211 participants (132 & x202f;852 mothers and 151 & x202f;359 children) in New Zealand. Data analyses were performed for 150 & x202f;699 children for whom data were available, 30 & x202f;696 siblings, and 4188 twins using covariate-adjusted analyses, and for 6249 siblings and 522 twins with discordant outcomes using fixed-effects analyses. Data analysis was performed November 2017 to March 2019. Exposure Exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy and/or early childhood. Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome is odds of obesity at age 4 years. Anthropometric data from children born between July 2008 and June 2011 were obtained from the B4 School Check, a national health screening program that records the height and weight of 4-year-old children in New Zealand. These data were linked to antibiotics (pharmaceutical records) dispensed to women before conception and during all 3 trimesters of pregnancy and to their children from birth until age 2 years. Results The overall study population consisted of 132 & x202f;852 mothers and 151 & x202f;359 children (77 & x202f;610 [51.3%] boys) who were aged 4 to 5 years when their anthropometrical measurements were assessed. Antibiotic exposure was common, with at least 1 course dispensed to 35.7% of mothers during pregnancy and 82.3% of children during the first 2 years of life. Results from covariate-adjusted analyses showed that both prenatal and early childhood exposures to antibiotics were independently associated with obesity at age 4 years, in a dose-dependent manner. Every additional course of antibiotics dispensed to the mothers yielded an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of obesity in their children (siblings) of 1.02 (95% CI, 0.99-1.06), which was similar to the odds across pregnancy for the whole population (aOR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.04-1.07). For the child's exposure, the aOR for the association between antibiotic exposure and obesity was 1.04 (95% CI, 1.03-1.05) among siblings and 1.05 (95% CI, 1.02-1.09) among twins. However, fixed-effects analyses of siblings and twins showed no associations between antibiotic exposure and obesity, with aORs of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90-1.00) for maternal exposure, 1.02 (95% CI, 0.99-1.04) for child's exposure, and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.81-1.02) for twins' exposure. Conclusions and Relevance Although covariate-adjusted analyses demonstrated an association between antibiotic exposure and odds of obesity, further analyses of siblings and twins with discordant outcomes showed no associations. Thus, these discordant results likely reflect unmeasured confounding factors. Question Is antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and/or during early childhood associated with the development of childhood obesity? Findings This cross-sectional national study of 284 & x202f;211 participants (132 & x202f;852 mothers and 151 & x202f;359 children) in New Zealand found that both prenatal and early childhood exposures to antibiotics were independently associated with obesity at age 4 years in a dose-dependent manner. However, fixed-effects analyses of siblings and twins with discordant outcomes showed no associations between antibiotic exposure and obesity. Meaning Although judicious use of antibiotics is necessary, antibiotics are unlikely to be a major contributor to childhood obesity. This cross-sectional study of mothers and their children in New Zealand assesses whether exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy and/or early childhood is associated with the development of childhood obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER MEDICAL ASSOC, 2020
National Category
Pediatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-406468 (URN)10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.19681 (DOI)000509315400009 ()31968118 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-09 Created: 2020-03-09 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Rerkasem, K., Wongthanee, A., Rerkasem, A., Pruenglampoo, S., Mangklabruks, A., Hofman, P. L., . . . Derraik, J. G. B. (2020). Lower insulin sensitivity in young adults born preterm in Thailand. Pediatric Diabetes, 21(2), 210-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lower insulin sensitivity in young adults born preterm in Thailand
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2020 (English)In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 210-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies reported impaired glucose homeostasis among preterm survivors, but consisted almost exclusively of Caucasians. It is unknown whether Asians born preterm display similar impairments.

Aim: To assess glucose homeostasis and other cardiometabolic outcomes among young adults born preterm in Thailand.

Methods: Participants were 575 young adult offspring of mothers from the Chiang Mai Low Birth Weight Study, born in 1989 to 1990 and followed up in 2010: 54.1% females, median age 20.6 years, including 33 individuals (5.7%) born preterm. After an overnight fast, participants underwent clinical assessments, including blood sampling (glucose, insulin, and lipid profile). Insulin sensitivity was assessed using HOMA-IR and insulin secretion estimated using HOMA-beta.

Results: In unadjusted analyses, young Thai adults born preterm were 3.2 cm shorter (P = .037), 6 kg lighter (P = .016), and had HOMA-beta 34% higher (P = .026) than those born at term. Adjusted analyses accounting for important confounders showed marked impairments in glucose homeostasis among preterm survivors: fasting insulin levels were 32% greater (P = .011), with HOMA-IR and HOMA-beta that were 31% (P = .020) and 43% higher (P = .005), respectively, compared to peers born at term. There were no other contrasting observations between groups, with anthropometric differences disappearing after adjustment for confounders.

Discussion: Young adults in Thailand born preterm were more insulin resistant than peers born at term. The observed impairments in glucose metabolism among young Thai adults born preterm corroborate findings reported mostly on Caucasians. The challenge for general practitioners and public health professionals is to encourage those born preterm to make healthier lifestyle choices early on.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2020
Keywords
females, gestation, glucose homeostasis, HOMA, insulin resistance, males, men, metabolism, premature, women
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-407207 (URN)10.1111/pedi.12969 (DOI)000512551300023 ()31854491 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-23 Created: 2020-03-23 Last updated: 2020-03-23Bibliographically approved
Hong, Y., Maessen, S. E., Dong, G., Huang, K., Wu, W., Liang, L., . . . Fu, J. (2019). Associations between maternal age at menarche and anthropometric and metabolic parameters in the adolescent offspring. Clinical Endocrinology, 90(5), 702-710
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between maternal age at menarche and anthropometric and metabolic parameters in the adolescent offspring
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 702-710Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: We examined the associations between maternal age at menarche and anthropometry and metabolism in adolescent offspring.

Methods: Anthropometric, metabolic and blood pressure data were obtained from 304 girls and 190 boys aged 11-16 years attending school in Hangzhou (China). Age at menarche for both mothers and daughters was self-reported. Fasting blood samples were obtained and all participants underwent clinical examinations. Obesity was defined as BMI >= 95th percentile for age and sex.

Results: Older maternal age at menarche was associated with older age of their daughters at menarche (r = 0.21; P < 0.001). Mother's age at menarche was not associated with anthropometry or metabolism of daughters. However, younger maternal age at menarche was associated with increased hip and waist circumferences, and BMI SDS of their sons. Boys whose mothers were <= 13 years at menarche had an adjusted relative risk of obesity 3-fold greater than sons of mothers with a later menarcheal onset (2.96; 95% CI 1.49, 5.87). Among daughters, every 1-year increase in their age at menarche was associated with a 0.34 SDS reduction in BMI. Increasing age at menarche was also associated with reduced waist and hip circumferences (-1.5 and -1.8 cm/y, respectively) and waist-to-height ratio (-0.008 per year). Girls in the youngest menarcheal age tertile (8.8-11.6 years) had diastolic blood pressure 2.2 mm Hg higher than other girls (P = 0.029).

Conclusions: Younger maternal age at menarche is associated with increased obesity risk in their sons, but not daughters. However, girls who experience menarche earlier have a less favourable anthropometric profile.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
age, boy, daughter, girl, menarche, mother, obesity, offspring, son
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383159 (URN)10.1111/cen.13948 (DOI)000465108600007 ()30739355 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Shackleton, N., Derraik, J. G. B., Audas, R., Taylor, R. W., Glover, M., Morton, S. M. B., . . . Milne, B. J. (2019). Decomposing ethnic differences in body mass index and obesity rates among New Zealand pre-schoolers. International Journal of Obesity, 43(10), 1951-1960
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decomposing ethnic differences in body mass index and obesity rates among New Zealand pre-schoolers
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 1951-1960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective To determine the extent to which ethnic differences in BMI Z-scores and obesity rates could be explained by the differential distribution of demographic (e.g. age), familial (e.g. family income), area (e.g. area deprivation), parental (e.g. immigration status), and birth (e.g. gestational age) characteristics across ethnic groups. Methods We used data on 4-year-old children born in New Zealand who attended the B4 School Check between the fiscal years of 2010/2011 to 2015/2016, who were resident in the country when the 2013 census was completed (n = 253,260). We implemented an Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition to explain differences in BMI Z-score and obesity between Maori (n = 63,061) and European (n = 139,546) children, and Pacific (n = 21,527) and European children. Results Overall, 15.2% of the children were obese and mean BMI Z-score was 0.66 (SD = 1.04). The Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition demonstrated that the difference in obesity rates between Maori and European children would halve if Maori children experienced the same familial and area level conditions as Europeans. If Pacific children had the same characteristics as European children, differences in obesity rates would reduce by approximately one third, but differences in mean BMI Z-scores would only reduce by 16.1%. Conclusion The differential distribution of familial, parental, area, and birth characteristics across ethnic groups explain a substantial percentage of the ethnic differences in obesity, especially for Maori compared to European children. However, marked disparities remain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395720 (URN)10.1038/s41366-019-0390-4 (DOI)000488494400008 ()31197250 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-24 Created: 2019-10-24 Last updated: 2019-10-24Bibliographically approved
Derraik, J. G. B., Miles, H. L., Chiavaroli, V., Hofman, P. L. & Cutfield, W. S. (2019). Idiopathic short stature and growth hormone sensitivity in prepubertal children. Clinical Endocrinology, 91(1), 110-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Idiopathic short stature and growth hormone sensitivity in prepubertal children
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: We compared growth hormone sensitivity to an insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) generation test in children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) and of normal stature (NS) across the birthweight range.

Methods: Forty-six prepubertal children (~7.1 years) born at term were studied: ISS (n = 23; 74% boys) and NS (n = 23; 57% boys). Children underwent a modified IGF-I generation test with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH; 0.05 mg/kg/d) over four consecutive days. Hormonal concentrations were measured at baseline and day 5.

Results: Children with idiopathic short stature were 1.90 SDS lighter (P < 0.0001) but had 4.5% more body fat (P = 0.0007) than NS children. Overall, decreasing birthweight SDS across the normal range (-1.9 to +1.5 SDS) was associated with lower percentage IGF-I response to rhGH stimulation in univariable (r = 0.45; P = 0.002) and multivariable models (β = 24.6; P = 0.006). Plasma IGF-I concentrations rose in both groups with rhGH stimulation (P < 0.0001). GHBP levels (P = 0.002) were suppressed in ISS children (-19%; P = 0.029) but increased among NS children (+18%; P = 0.028), with contrasting responses also observed for leptin and IGFBP-1. Further, the increase in insulin concentrations in response to rhGH stimulation was ~3-fold greater in NS children (142% vs 50%; P = 0.006).

Conclusions: A progressive decrease in birthweight SDS was associated with a reduction in GH sensitivity in both NS and ISS children. Thus, the lower IGF-I response to rhGH stimulation in association with decreasing birthweight indicates that the ISS children at the lower end of the birthweight spectrum may have partial GH resistance, which may contribute to their poorer growth.

Keywords
growth hormone binding globulin, height, insulin-like growth factor I, recombinant human growth hormone, sensitivity
National Category
Pediatrics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388758 (URN)10.1111/cen.13976 (DOI)000471601200014 ()30908679 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Maessen, S. E., Ahlsson, F., Lundgren, M., Cutfield, W. S. & Derraik, J. G. B. (2019). Maternal smoking early in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of short stature and obesity in adult daughters. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 4290.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal smoking early in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of short stature and obesity in adult daughters
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 4290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We assessed anthropometry in 22,421 adult daughters in association with their mothers' tobacco smoking early in pregnancy (at their first antenatal visit) in Sweden, particularly their risk of short stature and obesity. Adult daughters were grouped by maternal smoking levels during pregnancy: Nonsmokers (58.5%), Light smokers (24.1%; smoked 1-9 cigarettes/day), and Heavier smokers (17.4%; smoked >= 10 cigarettes/day). Anthropometry was recorded on the adult daughters at approximately 26.0 years of age. Obesity was defined as BMI >= 30 kg/m(2), and short stature as height more than two standard deviations below the population mean. Daughters whose mothers were Light and Heavier smokers in early pregnancy were 0.8 cm and 1.0cm shorter, 2.3 kg and 2.6 kg heavier, and had BMI 0.84 kg/m(2) and 1.15 kg/m(2) greater, respectively, than daughters of Non-smokers. The adjusted relative risk of short stature was 55% higher in women born to smokers, irrespectively of smoking levels. Maternal smoking had a dose-dependent association with obesity risk, with offspring of Heavier smokers 61% and of Light smokers 37% more likely to be obese than the daughters of Non-smokers. In conclusion, maternal smoking in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of short stature and obesity in their adult daughters.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380451 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-39006-7 (DOI)000460924100030 ()30862963 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Butler, E. M., Suhag, A., Hong, Y., Liang, L., Gong, C., Xiong, F., . . . Derraik, J. G. B. (2019). Parental Perceptions of Obesity in School Children and Subsequent Action. CHILDHOOD OBESITY, 15(7), 459-467
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental Perceptions of Obesity in School Children and Subsequent Action
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2019 (English)In: CHILDHOOD OBESITY, ISSN 2153-2168, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 459-467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite perceiving their child as being above a healthy weight, many parents do not intervene. Little is known about the factors influencing parental action. We assessed parental perception of child's weight status, the prevalence of mitigating parental action, and the underlying factors.

Methods: We studied 20,242 children and adolescents from 6 centers across China. Anthropometry was measured by research nurses. Parents answered questionnaires, including their perception of their child's weight status, and any subsequent weight treatment.

Results: A total of 3254 children had obesity (16.1%), with 63.0% correctly perceived as overweight by their parents. These children were more likely to be older (>= 8 years; p < 0.0001), have severe obesity [adjusted relative risk (aRR) 1.41; p < 0.0001], and have mothers with overweight/obesity (aRR 1.15; p < 0.0001). In particular, parents of children aged <8 years were over five times more likely to perceive their child with overweight/obesity as "thin" than parents of teenagers. Conversely, girls, older children/adolescents, and urban youth were more likely to be wrongly perceived by parents as having an overweight issue. Only one in four children (27.8%) with available information received treatment for their perceived weight problem. Children with severe obesity were more likely to be treated (aRR 1.34; p < 0.0001), as were children of mothers with overweight/obesity (aRR 1.18; p = 0.002).

Conclusions: Only one in four Chinese children perceived as overweight by their parents received treatment for their weight problem. Given that overweight/obesity in childhood tracks into adulthood and many parents did not intervene despite perceiving an overweight problem in their child, interventions for childhood obesity need to extend beyond parental perception of children's weight status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, 2019
Keywords
daughter, parent, son, treatment, weight
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396114 (URN)10.1089/chi.2018.0338 (DOI)000481028600001 ()31408357 (PubMedID)
Note

De två sista författarna delar sistaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-10-31 Created: 2019-10-31 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Chiavaroli, V., Derraik, J. G. B., Jalaludin, M. Y., Albert, B. B., Ramkumar, S., Cutfield, W. S., . . . Jefferies, C. A. (2019). Partial remission in type 1 diabetes and associated factors: Analysis based on the insulin dose-adjusted hemoglobin A1c in children and adolescents from a regional diabetes center, Auckland, New Zealand. Pediatric Diabetes, 20(7), 892-900
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Partial remission in type 1 diabetes and associated factors: Analysis based on the insulin dose-adjusted hemoglobin A1c in children and adolescents from a regional diabetes center, Auckland, New Zealand
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2019 (English)In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 892-900Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Partial remission (PREM) by the insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1c) method has not been evaluated for the combined associations of ethnicity and socioeconomic status in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Objective To investigate prevalence and predictors of PREM defined by IDAA1c. Methods Six hundred fourteen of 678 children (aged <15 years) with new-onset T1D (2000-2013) from a regional pediatric diabetes service (Auckland, New Zealand). Results Overall rate of PREM at 3 months was 42.4%, and lower in Maori/Pacific children (28.6%; P = .006) and those of other ethnicities (28.8%; P = .030) compared with New Zealand Europeans (50.4%). Comparing the most and least deprived socioeconomic quintiles, the odds of PREM were lower among the most deprived (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.44; P = .019). Lower rates of PREM were seen in children aged 0 to 4.9 years (23.8%) and 10 to 14 years (40.9%) than in children aged 5 to 9.9 years (57.4%; P < .05). Further predictors of lower rates of PREM were ketoacidosis at diagnosis (aOR 0.54 with DKA; P = .002) and diabetes duration (aOR 0.84 per month; P < .0001). Patient's sex, body mass index standard deviation score, or autoantibodies were not associated with PREM. PREM at 3 months was associated with lower HbA1c over 18 months compared with children not in PREM (65.0 vs 71.3 mmol/mol; P < .0001), independent of ketoacidosis. Conclusions This study on a regional cohort of youth with T1D showed social and ethnic disparities in rates of PREM defined by IDAA1c. Further research into reducing ketoacidosis rates at diagnosis and addressing factors associated with lower rates of PREM in non-European children are important health priorities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
adolescents, children, ethnicity, ketoacidosis, partial remission, socioeconomic status, type 1 diabetes
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398708 (URN)10.1111/pedi.12881 (DOI)000474123100001 ()31237756 (PubMedID)
Funder
Novo Nordisk
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
Derraik, J. G. B., Pasupathy, D., McCowan, L. M., Poston, L., Taylor, R. S., Simpson, N. A., . . . Ahlsson, F. (2019). Paternal contributions to large-for-gestational-age term babies: findings from a multicenter prospective cohort study. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 10(5), 529-535, Article ID PII S2040174419000035.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paternal contributions to large-for-gestational-age term babies: findings from a multicenter prospective cohort study
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, ISSN 2040-1744, E-ISSN 2040-1752, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 529-535, article id PII S2040174419000035Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We assessed whether paternal demographic, anthropometric and clinical factors influence the risk of an infant being born large-for-gestational-age (LGA). We examined the data on 3659 fathers of term offspring (including 662 LGA infants) born to primiparous women from Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE). LGA was defined as birth weight >90th centile as per INTERGROWTH 21st standards, with reference group being infants <= 90th centile. Associations between paternal factors and likelihood of an LGA infant were examined using univariable and multivariable models. Men who fathered LGA babies were 180 g heavier at birth (P<0.001) and were more likely to have been born macrosomic (P<0.001) than those whose infants were not LGA. Fathers of LGA infants were 2.1 cm taller (P<0.001), 2.8 kg heavier (P<0.001) and had similar body mass index (BMI). In multivariable models, increasing paternal birth weight and height were independently associated with greater odds of having an LGA infant, irrespective of maternal factors. One unit increase in paternal BMI was associated with 2.9% greater odds of having an LGA boy but not girl; however, this association disappeared after adjustment for maternal BMI. There were no associations between paternal demographic factors or clinical history and infant LGA. In conclusion, fathers who were heavier at birth and were taller were more likely to have an LGA infant, but maternal BMI had a dominant influence on LGA.

Keywords
birth weight, BMI, body mass index, father, LGA, mother
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395790 (URN)10.1017/S2040174419000035 (DOI)000487034700004 ()30813979 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-25Bibliographically approved
Skudder-Hill, L., Ahlsson, F., Lundgren, M., Cutfield, W. S. & Derraik, J. G. B. (2019). Preterm Birth is Associated With Increased Blood Pressure in Young Adult Women. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, 8(12), Article ID e012274.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preterm Birth is Associated With Increased Blood Pressure in Young Adult Women
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2019 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e012274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background-While there is some evidence of elevated blood pressure later in life in preterm survivors, data on adult women are still lacking. Thus, we assessed the associations between preterm birth and blood pressure in young adult women. Methods and Results-We studied 5232 young adult women who volunteered for military service in Sweden between 1990 and 2007. Anthropometric and clinic blood pressure data were collected during the medical examination at the time of conscription. There was a progressive decline in systolic and diastolic blood pressures, as well as in mean arterial pressure, with increasing gestational age. Women born preterm had an adjusted increase in systolic blood pressure of 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI, 2.5-5.1; P<0.0001) and mean arterial pressure of 1.9 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.9-2.8; P 0.0001) compared with young women born at term. Rates of systolic hypertension were also considerably higher in young women born preterm (14.0% versus 8.1%, P<0.0001), as were rates of isolated systolic hypertension. The adjusted relative risk of systolic hypertension in women born preterm was 1.72 (95% CI, 1.26-2.34; P<0.001) that of women born at term or post-term, but there was no significant difference in the risk of diastolic hypertension (adjusted relative risk, 1.60; 95% CI, 0.49-5.20). Conclusions-Young adult women born preterm display elevated systolic blood pressure and an increased risk of hypertension compared with peers born at term or post-term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
high blood pressure, hypertension, prematurity, preterm birth, systolic blood pressure, women, young adult
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394172 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.119.012274 (DOI)000484577400017 ()31164036 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1226-1956

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