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Johansson, MargaretaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0766-9957
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Thies-Lagergren, L. & Johansson, M. (2019). Intrapartum midwifery care impact Swedish couple's birth experiences: A cross-sectional study. Women and Birth, 32(3), 213-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intrapartum midwifery care impact Swedish couple's birth experiences: A cross-sectional study
2019 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Parents' birth experiences affect bonding with their infant, which in turn may influence the child's future health. Parents' satisfaction with childbirth is multi-dimensional and dependent on both expectations and experiences. Increasing involvement of partners in intrapartum care may lead to an assumption that the birthing couple shares attitudes and expectations of intrapartum care. There is a limited knowledge regarding the uniformity of couples' experiences of labour and birth.

AIM: To describe and compare uniformity in couples' birth experiences of the quality of intrapartum midwifery care.

METHOD: A quantitative cross-sectional study nested within a randomised controlled trial. In total 209 healthy primiparous mothers and their partners were recruited. A quality of care index was generated from an on-line questionnaire administered as a follow-up to the randomised controlled trial. Uniformity and differences were identified regarding the coupleś experiences of birth and their preferences for intrapartum care RESULTS: A high level of uniformity between the mothers and their partners was revealed. Birth was a positive experience for 79% of partners and 73% of mothers whom were more likely to have experienced a spontaneous vaginal birth. Partners and mothers with a less positive birth experienced deficiencies regarding: being in control, receiving information about labour progress and midwife's presence in labour room.

DISCUSSION: Midwives can enhance couples' feeling of being in control during labour and birth by being attentive, present and continuously providing adequate information and emotional support.

Keywords
Birth experience, Couples, Intrapartum midwifery care, Quality of care, Uniformity
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364888 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2018.08.163 (DOI)000470848100022 ()30217554 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-07-03Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Thies-Lagergren, L. & Wells, M. B. (2019). Mothers' experiences in relation to a new Swedish postnatal home-based model of midwifery care: A cross-sectional study. Midwifery, 78, 140-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers' experiences in relation to a new Swedish postnatal home-based model of midwifery care: A cross-sectional study
2019 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 78, p. 140-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The goal of postnatal care is to provide the highest possible quality of care and medical safety with the least possible intervention in order to optimize health and wellbeing of the new family. The aim of the study was to describe mothers ' experiences in relation to a new postnatal home-based model of midwifery care.

Methods: The current study uses a cross-sectional mixed method design to assess a new postnatal home-based model of midwifery care in Sweden. Healthy women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and child-birth, and with a healthy baby answered an online questionnaire one week after birth. Data were collected during one year (2017-2018) and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics for quantitative data, and manifest content analysis for qualitative data.

Findings: In total, 180 mothers with one to six children were included. They were most likely to have been discharged between six and 12 h after childbirth (56%) and 90% reported that the time for their discharge was good. The postnatal check-ups included were telephone contact (100%), home visit(s) (94%) and hospital visit(s) (98%). Most mothers had a positive postnatal care experience from using the new postnatal model of midwifery care (mean VAS 8.74, Std. Deviation 1.438). For 75%, of the participants, home-based postnatal care would be preferred for their next childbirth.

Conclusion: Home-based postnatal care is well accepted by mothers who were discharged early after childbirth. Mothers with a positive experience of the new postnatal model of midwifery care would prefer home-based postnatal care for their next childbirth. Midwifery care should include home-based postnatal care.

Keywords
Childbirth, Experiences, Home-based care, Model of postnatal care, Mothers
National Category
Nursing Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394945 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.010 (DOI)000484396500019 ()31446229 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Blixt, I., Johansson, M., Hildingsson, I., Papoutsi, Z. & Rubertsson, C. (2019). Women's advice to healthcare professionals regarding breastfeeding: "offer sensitive individualized breastfeeding support"- an interview study. International Breastfeeding Journal, 14, Article ID 51.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women's advice to healthcare professionals regarding breastfeeding: "offer sensitive individualized breastfeeding support"- an interview study
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2019 (English)In: International Breastfeeding Journal, ISSN 1746-4358, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 14, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months followed by continued breastfeeding with complementary food up to 2 years of age or beyond. Few women achieve this recommendation in Sweden, and they often stop breastfeeding earlier than they would like. Investigating women's advice to healthcare professionals is important for the provision of optimal breastfeeding support. The aim of this study was to explore women's advice to healthcare professionals regarding support for continuing to breastfeed for at least 6 months.

Methods

This investigation used an exploratory study design, and a purposive sample of women was recruited between 2015 and 2016 through social media platforms. The work is a follow-up of an earlier study exploring women's perceptions of the factors that assisted them in breastfeeding for at least 6 months. Telephone interviews were conducted with 139 Swedish women who reported that they had breastfed for at least 6 months. Women were asked the question, "Do you have any advice that you would like to give to healthcare professionals regarding breastfeeding support?". The data were analysed using content analysis.

Results

The theme, "Professionals need to offer women sensitive, individualized breastfeeding support to promote a positive breastfeeding experience", describes the women's advice based on five categories: 1) providing evidence-based care, 2) preparing expectant parents during pregnancy, 3) creating a respectful and mutual dialogue, 4) offering individual solutions to breastfeeding problems, and 5) offering practical support.

Conclusions

This study highlights the importance of professionals providing evidence-based breastfeeding support in a sensitive and individualized manner. This consideration is an important prerequisite to strengthening women's self-confidence and assisting them in reaching their breastfeeding goals, which may enhance the positive nature of their breastfeeding experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Breastfeeding, Healthcare professionals, Support, Women’sadvice
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400080 (URN)10.1186/s13006-019-0247-4 (DOI)000513520300002 ()31889974 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2020-03-27Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0766-9957

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