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Nordlund, Lina MtwanaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4450-2331
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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Pike, F., Jiddawi, N. S. & Nordlund, L. M. (2024). Intertidal gleaning fisheries: Recognising local-scale contributions and management scenarios. Marine Policy, 162, Article ID 106059.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intertidal gleaning fisheries: Recognising local-scale contributions and management scenarios
2024 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 162, article id 106059Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intertidal gleaning is a widespread means through which women participate in the fishery harvest sector. However, the fishery is often under recognised in management and policy-making. Accordingly, there is a need to further our understanding of the fishery, and how local factors may help or hinder effective management. This study focuses on Zanzibar, Tanzania, using focus group discussions (FGDs) and interviews to investigate localscale contributions from gleaning in seagrass dominated areas - which are particularly frequented gleaning grounds locally, and more widely in the Indo-Pacific region. The study also gathered insight into how gleaners perceived different management scenarios used elsewhere within the small-scale fishery sector. Despite being typically viewed as a sustenance means, gleaning was found to be primarily an economic activity, mainly through catching the bivalve, Anadara antiquata, and commercial gastropod species (Chicoreus ramosus and Pleuroploca spp). FGD respondents held positive pre-conceived ideas about rotating no-take zone scenarios as a management strategy, as well as indicating preferences for community-based measures. In order for no-take zones to have a higher chance of success, further investigation is needed to understand the life histories of commonly gleaned species in order to inform rotation periods, as well as developing means of cross-community cooperation due to the shared, open access nature of intertidal zones. These results demonstrate the economic importance of gleaning for coastal women in Zanzibar, who have invaluable insights, built on lived experience and local knowledge, which could enable and benefit a more inclusive management system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Small-scale fisheries, Fishery management, Gender, Invertebrates, Seagrass, invertebrate harvesting
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-528229 (URN)10.1016/j.marpol.2024.106059 (DOI)001210293900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05411
Available from: 2024-05-17 Created: 2024-05-17 Last updated: 2024-05-17Bibliographically approved
Nordlund, L. M., Unsworth, R. K. F., Wallner-Hahn, S., Ratnarajah, L., Beca-Carretero, P., Boikova, E., . . . Wilkes, R. (2024). One hundred priority questions for advancing seagrass conservation in Europe. Plants, People, Planet, 6(3), 587-603
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One hundred priority questions for advancing seagrass conservation in Europe
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2024 (English)In: Plants, People, Planet, E-ISSN 2572-2611, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 587-603Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Societal Impact Statement

Seagrass ecosystems are of fundamental importance to our planet and wellbeing. Seagrasses are marine flowering plants, which engineer ecosystems that provide a multitude of ecosystem services, for example, blue foods and carbon sequestration. Seagrass ecosystems have largely been degraded across much of their global range. There is now increasing interest in the conservation and restoration of these systems, particularly in the context of the climate emergency and the biodiversity crisis. The collation of 100 questions from experts across Europe could, if answered, improve our ability to conserve and restore these systems by facilitating a fundamental shift in the success of such work.

Summary

Seagrass meadows provide numerous ecosystem services including biodiversity, coastal protection, and carbon sequestration. In Europe, seagrasses can be found in shallow sheltered waters along coastlines, in estuaries & lagoons, and around islands, but their distribution has declined. Factors such as poor water quality, coastal modification, mechanical damage, overfishing, land-sea interactions, climate change and disease have reduced the coverage of Europe’s seagrasses necessitating their recovery. Research, monitoring and conservation efforts on seagrass ecosystems in Europe are mostly uncoordinated and biased towards certain species and regions, resulting in inadequate delivery of critical information for their management. Here, we aim to identify the 100 priority questions, that if addressed would strongly advance seagrass monitoring, research and conservation in Europe. Using a Delphi method, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers with seagrass experience from across Europe and with diverse seagrass expertise participated in the process that involved the formulation of research questions, a voting process and an online workshop to identify the final list of the 100 questions. The final list of questions covers areas across nine themes: Biodiversity & Ecology; Ecosystem services; Blue carbon; Fishery support; Drivers, Threats, Resilience & Response; Monitoring & Assessment; Conservation & Restoration; Governance, Policy & Management; and Communication. Answering these questions will fill current knowledge gaps and place European seagrass onto a positive trajectory of recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
aquatic environment, biodiversity, blue carbon, communication, Delphi method, ecosystem services, eelgrass, monitoring
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-533512 (URN)10.1002/ppp3.10486 (DOI)001159313600001 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 862626
Available from: 2024-06-28 Created: 2024-06-28 Last updated: 2024-06-28Bibliographically approved
Alati, V. M., Osuka, K., Otwoma, L. M., Tuda, P. & Nordlund, L. M. (2023). Gender analysis in fisheries: The case of the shelled mollusc fisheries in Kenya. Marine Policy, 158, Article ID 105863.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender analysis in fisheries: The case of the shelled mollusc fisheries in Kenya
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2023 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 158, article id 105863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Analysing gender in small-scale fisheries (SSF) is vital for understanding the contributions of women and men and detecting potential inequalities. In this study, the shelled mollusc fishery was examined through the gender lens using quantitative and qualitative data collected from 132 shelled mollusc fishers accross five sites in coastal Kenya. In Kenya, both women and men participate in shelled mollusc fisheries. The study incorporated in its analyses the main components that intersect with gender to investigate whether similarities and differences exist in SSF in coastal Kenya in terms of access to shelled mollusc fisheries resources and the distribution of monetary benefits from the fishery. Most women respondents (73%, n = 91) relied on shelled mollusc fishing as their primary occupation compared to men (17%, n = 41) whose primary occupation was finfish fishing (69%, n = 41). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between women and men fishers in terms of income per individual fisher, time spent fishing, the number of species caught per individual fisher, as well as the monetary value of shells caught. There are several similarities between women and men in this fishery, but with a very important distinction that women more often consider this fishery their primary occupation. Thus, women constitute a large and important part of this fishery in Kenya. To advance coastal and fisheries management, it is essential that women, as well as gender aspects, are included in policy and decision-making processes related to SSF.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Gender, Small-scale fisheries, Kenya coast, Shelled molluscs
National Category
Fish and Aquacultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-517516 (URN)10.1016/j.marpol.2023.105863 (DOI)001102978900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2021-03773
Available from: 2023-12-13 Created: 2023-12-13 Last updated: 2023-12-13Bibliographically approved
Stiepani, J., Jiddawi, N. & Nordlund, L. M. (2023). Social-ecological system analysis of an invertebrate gleaning fishery on the island of Unguja, Zanzibar. Ambio, 52(1), 140-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social-ecological system analysis of an invertebrate gleaning fishery on the island of Unguja, Zanzibar
2023 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 140-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Invertebrate gleaning is a small-scale fishery that commonly occurs in the intertidal zone across the tropical Indo-Pacific. In this study, we investigated and analyzed several components of this fishery on the island of Unguja, Zanzibar by employing the social-ecological systems framework from Ostrom 2009. In doing so, we conducted ecological surveys, catch assessments, interviews with gleaners, household surveys, focus group interviews and analyzed the governance structure. This social-ecological systems analysis showed that gleaning is important for food security, local culture and livelihood. Yet, the multiple approaches in our study revealed that the local intertidal zone is degrading and that the gleaned catch is changing. Local narratives indicate that economically important bivalves (Modiolus spp.) and gastropods (Strombus spp.) are in decline, which was paralleled with low abundances of both genera within the ecological survey of the intertidal and catch landing assessment. We recommend that invertebrate gleaning, a fishery mainly comprised of women should be included in fisheries management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-481715 (URN)10.1007/s13280-022-01769-1 (DOI)000837965600002 ()35945415 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-05411Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-05535Uppsala University
Available from: 2022-08-15 Created: 2022-08-15 Last updated: 2024-04-11Bibliographically approved
Charisiadou, S., Halling, C., Jiddawi, N., von Schreeb, K., Gullstrom, M., Larsson, T. & Mtwana Nordlund, L. (2022). Coastal aquaculture in Zanzibar, Tanzania. Aquaculture, 546, Article ID 737331.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coastal aquaculture in Zanzibar, Tanzania
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2022 (English)In: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 546, article id 737331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study provides an overview of the multi-sectoral coastal aquaculture development in Zanzibar (Tanzania) over the last thirty years based on empirical evidence from interviews, field observations, policy reports and literature reviews. Despite the immense potential of aquaculture for food and livelihoods, only seaweed farming has so far established into commercial-scale production. This activity is dominated by women and became widespread in the early 1990s as a small but regular source of income. However, seaweed farming constraints such as frequent seaweed die-offs, as well as economic and institutional constraints inhibit its development. Other types of aquaculture activities such as fish farming, mud crab fattening, half-pearl farming, sea cucumber farming and sponge and coral cultures are under development with limited production or in experimental stages. Common constraints among these activities are economic limitations, lack of technical infrastructure and skills, small and irregular production, and limited trade and market availabilities. At the same time, there is a lack of sufficient management and monitoring systems, while there are no formal regulations or clear strategies to boost aquaculture at the national level. In addition, new aquaculture initiatives are often dominated by donor-driven projects instead of local entrepreneurships. This situation does not encourage engagement in aquaculture and thus such activities are outcompeted by other already established sectors (e.g. agriculture and fisheries). We conclude that aquaculture has great potential to evolve due to high environmental capacity. Nevertheless, achieving profitable production and a stronger commitment within local communities, as well as developing effective mariculture governance through support mechanisms and clear strategies to boost the sector at the national level, are essential for sustainable mariculture development in Zanzibar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierElsevier BV, 2022
Keywords
Mariculture governance, Seaweed farming, Fish farming, Pearl farming, Sea cucumber cultures, Crab fattening, Western Indian Ocean
National Category
Fish and Aquacultural Science Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-462460 (URN)10.1016/j.aquaculture.2021.737331 (DOI)000729961500018 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-1288Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1111
Available from: 2021-12-23 Created: 2021-12-23 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Jones, B. L. H., Unsworth, R. K. F., Nordlund, L. M., Eklöf, J. S., Ambo-Rappe, R., Carly, F., . . . Cullen-Unsworth, L. C. (2022). Dependence on seagrass fisheries governed by household income and adaptive capacity. Ocean and Coastal Management, 225, Article ID 106247.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dependence on seagrass fisheries governed by household income and adaptive capacity
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2022 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 225, article id 106247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seagrass meadows, like other tropical coastal ecosystems, are highly productive and sustain millions of people worldwide. However, the factors that govern the use of seagrass as a fishing habitat over other habitats are largely unknown, especially at the household scale. Using socioeconomic factors from 147 villages across four countries within the Indo-Pacific, we examined the drivers of household dependence on seagrass. We revealed that seagrass was the most common habitat used for fishing across villages in all the countries studied, being preferred over other habitats for reliability. Using structural equation modelling, we exposed how household income and adaptive capacity appears to govern dependence on seagrass. Poorer households were less likely to own motorboats and dependent on seagrass as they were unable to fish elsewhere, whereas wealthier households were more likely to invest in certain fishing gears that incentivised them to use seagrass habitats due to high rewards and low effort requirements. Our findings accentuate the complexity of seagrass social-ecological systems and the need for empirical household scale data for effective management. Safeguarding seagrass is vital to ensure that vulnerable households have equitable and equal access to the resource, addressing ocean recovery and ensuring sustainable coastal communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierElsevier BV, 2022
Keywords
Seagrass meadows, Small-scale fisheries, Adaptive capacity, Livelihoods, Socioeconomics, Social-ecological systems, Household interviews
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-478813 (URN)10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2022.106247 (DOI)000808375900006 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-01288Swedish Research Council, 2017-05535Swedish Research Council, 1578/UN4.21.PL.00.00/2018
Available from: 2022-06-27 Created: 2022-06-27 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Jones, B. L. H., Unsworth, R. K. F., Nordlund, L. M., Ambo-Rappe, R., La Nafie, Y. A., Lopez, M. R., . . . Cullen-Unsworth, L. C. (2022). Local Ecological Knowledge Reveals Change in Seagrass Social–Ecological Systems. Oceans, 3(3), 419-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local Ecological Knowledge Reveals Change in Seagrass Social–Ecological Systems
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2022 (English)In: Oceans, E-ISSN 2673-1924, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 419-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is widely recognized that humanity is currently facing multiple planetary crises, including the widespread loss of biodiversity and a rapidly changing climate. The impacts of these crises are often far reaching and threaten food security (SDG goal two: zero hunger). Small-scale fisheries are estimated to provide livelihoods for over one hundred million people and sustenance for approximately one billion people but face a plethora of threats and challenges linked to planetary crises. In this multi-country assessment (150 coastal villages across five countries within the Indo-Pacific), household interviews revealed how seagrass meadows are important to small-scale fisheries, particularly as a place to find and collect a reliable source of food. Interviews also revealed that habitat loss and the over-exploitation of these resources are placing people and their food security at risk. This study exposed how dynamic local ecological knowledge can be, uncovering personal opinions and responsibilities that result in the hybridization of knowledge. Here, we demonstrate the importance of using local ecological knowledge to incorporate shared values into management but also highlight that an integrated approach, pairing local and conventional scientific knowledge, is needed urgently if we are to meet the needs of people while simultaneously conserving biodiversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
local ecological knowledge; cognitive dissonance; attribution theory; biodiversity loss; seagrass meadows
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-505640 (URN)10.3390/oceans3030028 (DOI)001010389800001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-01288Swedish Research Council, 2017-05535Swedish Research Council, 2017-05411
Available from: 2023-06-20 Created: 2023-06-20 Last updated: 2023-07-11Bibliographically approved
Jones, B. L. H., Cullen-Unsworth, L. C., De la Torre-Castro, M., Nordlund, L. M., Unsworth, R. K. F. & Eklöf, J. S. (2022). Unintended consequences of sustainable development initiatives: risks and opportunities in seagrass social-ecological systems. Ecology and Society, 27(2), Article ID 10.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unintended consequences of sustainable development initiatives: risks and opportunities in seagrass social-ecological systems
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2022 (English)In: Ecology and Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 27, no 2, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conserving biodiversity with a growing human population is a key sustainability challenge. Consequently, a vast number of development initiatives across the globe have been designed to combine social, economic, and environmental perspectives. For the most part, the development community is well acquainted with the negative experiences and unintended consequences that some projects have or may bring. However, in tropical coastal ecosystems, this aspect is not completely acknowledged, studied, or understood. Here, we use tropical seagrass meadows as a model social-ecological system to investigate how sustainable development initiatives result in unintended consequences with both positive and negative outcomes for environment and society. We analyze the initiatives and their effects in terms of a typology encompassing ???flow???, ???addition???, and ???deletion??? effects and investigate them across four types of sustainable development initiatives that occur within tropical coastal environments: (1) megafauna conservation, (2) alternative livelihood programs, (3) mosquito net malaria prophylaxis, and (4) marine protected areas. Using these four initiatives as examples, we show that sustainable development initiatives can produce unintended effects with major consequences. Further, we illustrate how not assessing such effects may ultimately undermine the initial goals of the sustainable development intervention. Our study suggests that acknowledging unintended effects and transitioning them so that they become sustainable is more effective than ignoring effects or viewing them as trade-offs. We strongly stress the need for an a priori process in which positive effects, negative effects, and potential uncertainties and surprises are considered when planning the development intervention, and we argue for greater social-ecological monitoring of initiatives. As such, this contribution links to contemporary approaches dealing with the sustainability of natural resources and social-ecological systems and bridges with the importance of development initiatives in the context of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Resilience Alliance, Inc., 2022
Keywords
seagrass meadows, social -ecological system (SES), sustainable development, systems change, unintended consequences
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-481916 (URN)10.5751/ES-13063-270210 (DOI)000828540400012 ()
Available from: 2022-08-17 Created: 2022-08-17 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Jones, B. L., Nordlund, L. M., Unsworth, R. K. F., Jiddawi, N. S. & Eklof, J. S. (2021). Seagrass Structural Traits Drive Fish Assemblages in Small-Scale Fisheries. Frontiers in Marine Science, 8, Article ID 640528.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seagrass Structural Traits Drive Fish Assemblages in Small-Scale Fisheries
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2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 8, article id 640528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seagrasses ? a group of foundation species in coastal ecosystems ? provide key habitat for diverse and abundant faunal assemblages and support numerous ecosystem functions and services. However, whether the habitat role of seagrasses is influenced by seagrass diversity, by dominant species or both, remains unclear. To that end, we sought to investigate the specific seagrass characteristics (e.g., species diversity, seagrass traits) that influence tropical fish assemblages, and place this in the context of small-scale fishery use. We surveyed seagrass variables at 55 plots, nested within 12 sites around Zanzibar (Tanzania) in the Western Indian Ocean, and used Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) systems to assess fish assemblages across plots. Using linear mixed models, we reveal that seagrass structural complexity and depth were the best predictors of fish abundance, with higher abundance occurring in deeper meadows or meadows with high canopy, leaf length and number of leaves per shoot. Moreover, an interaction between seagrass cover and land-use was the best predictor of fish species richness, where sites closer to human impacts were less affected by cover than sites with lower human impact. Overall, models with seagrass species richness or functional diversity as predictors poorly explained fish assemblages. Fish taxa that were important for small-scale fishery sectors (e.g., emperors, snappers, rabbitfish, and parrotfish) were primarily driven by seagrass structural complexity. Our results provide a unique analysis of the relationship between seagrass habitat and its associated fish assemblages in that we show that seagrass species diversity had little effect on seagrass fish assemblages, which instead appear driven by specific seagrass traits and seagrass cover. If conserving high value species that support adjacent fisheries is the priority for protecting seagrass meadows, then seagrass areas should be chosen with high cover and structural complexity that are in deeper waters. Any conservation measures also need to balance the needs of fishers that use the resources supported by seagrasses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A.Frontiers Media SA, 2021
Keywords
seagrass meadows, fish assemblages, species diversity, small-scale fisheries, habitat structure, functional ecology
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-442722 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2021.640528 (DOI)000639888900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05535Swedish Research Council, 2017-05411
Available from: 2021-06-14 Created: 2021-06-14 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Alati, V. M., Olunga, J., Olendo, M., Daudi, L. N., Osuka, K., Odoli, C., . . . Nordlund, L. M. (2020). Mollusc shell fisheries in coastal Kenya: Local ecological knowledge reveals overfishing. Ocean and Coastal Management, 195, Article ID 105285.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mollusc shell fisheries in coastal Kenya: Local ecological knowledge reveals overfishing
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2020 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 195, article id 105285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is limited documentation on the status and dynamics of fished marine shelled mollusc species in many countries. Some of the challenges are due to obscure documentation of species, extensive unregulated and unrecorded fishing and unawareness of drivers behind declining stocks. The lack of understanding makes it difficult to formulate effective management plans. Here, we assess the fishers' perceptions on changes in abundance of targeted marine shelled mollusc species and status of associated fished habitats. We interviewed 132 marine shelled mollusc gleaners (fishing by walking) at five sites in coastal Kenya. We established that a multispecies marine shelled mollusc fishery is present in Kenya and that this fishery is conducted by both women and men. We distinguished 158 different shelled mollusc species being targeted. The gleaners perceived a temporal decline of gleaned species. The main causes for the decline were perceived to be overfishing of shells, elevated sea-surface temperature and habitat destruction. The more experienced gleaners perceived a greater decline indicating a baseline shift in perceptions. Our findings suggest that local ecological knowledge is useful to understand historic changes in fisheries lacking long-term scientific data. Furthermore, it highlights the potential benefits of a collaboration between ecologists and gleaners to improve our understanding of the status and dynamics of fishing of marine shelled molluscs as well as other types of fishing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2020
Keywords
Local ecological knowledge, Marine shelled molluscs, Gleaning, Shifting baselines, Seagrass meadows
National Category
Ecology Fish and Aquacultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-423358 (URN)10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2020.105285 (DOI)000571500200002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05411
Available from: 2020-10-29 Created: 2020-10-29 Last updated: 2020-10-29Bibliographically approved
Projects
Establishing an Indo-Pacific Seagrass Network (IPSN) to assess linkages among marine biodiversity, ecosystem services and poverty [2017-05411_VR]; Uppsala University; Publications
Pike, F., Jiddawi, N. S. & Nordlund, L. M. (2024). Intertidal gleaning fisheries: Recognising local-scale contributions and management scenarios. Marine Policy, 162, Article ID 106059. Stiepani, J., Sandig, A. & Blicharska, M. (2023). The Where, the How, and the Why of the gleaning fishery: Livelihoods, food security, threats and management on the island of Malalison, Philippines. Ocean and Coastal Management, 244, Article ID 106806.
Interdiciplinary Island and Sescape Reserach Cluster
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4450-2331

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