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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Berkström, C., Papadopoulos, M., Jiddawi, N. S. & Nordlund, L. M. (2019). Fishers' Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK) on Connectivity and Seascape Management. Frontiers in Marine Science, 6, Article ID 130.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fishers' Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK) on Connectivity and Seascape Management
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 6, article id 130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In developing countries where data and resources are lacking, the practical relevance of local ecological knowledge (LEK) to expand our understanding of the environment, has been highlighted. The potential roles of the LEK varies from direct applications such as gathering environmental information to a more participative involvement of the community in the management of resources they depend on. Fishers' LEK could therefore be useful in order to obtain information on how to advance management of coastal fisheries. Many targeted fish species migrate between habitats to feed, spawn or recruit, connecting important habitats within the seascape. LEK could help provide answers to questions related to this connectivity and the identification of fish habitat use, and migrations for species and areas where such knowledge is scarce. Here we assess fishers' LEK on connectivity between multiple habitats within a tropical seascape, investigate the differences in LEK among fisher groups and the coherence between LEK and conventional scientific knowledge (CSK). The study was conducted in 2017 in Zanzibar, Tanzania, a tropical developing country. One hundred and thirty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted in six different locations focusing on fish migrations, and matching photos of fish and habitats. Differences between fisher groups were found, where fishers traveling further, exposed to multiple habitats, and who fish with multiple gears had a greater knowledge of connectivity patterns within the seascape than those that fish locally, in single habitats and with just one type of gear. A high degree of overlap in LEK and CSK was found, highlighting the potential benefits of a collaboration between scientists and fishers, and the use of LEK as complementary information in the management of small-scale fisheries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2019
Keywords
small-scale fisheries, seascape, fish migrations, data-poor, participatory research, coral reef, mangrove, seagrass
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381583 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2019.00130 (DOI)000462731300003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, E0344801Swedish Research Council, 2015-05902Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-1288
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Unsworth, R. K. F., McKenzie, L. J., Collier, C. J., Cullen-Unsworth, L. C., Duarte, C. M., Eklöf, J. S., . . . Nordlund, L. M. (2019). Global challenges for seagrass conservation. Ambio, 48(8), 801-815
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global challenges for seagrass conservation
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2019 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 801-815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seagrasses, flowering marine plants that form underwater meadows, play a significant global role in supporting food security, mitigating climate change and supporting biodiversity. Although progress is being made to conserve seagrass meadows in select areas, most meadows remain under significant pressure resulting in a decline in meadow condition and loss of function. Effective management strategies need to be implemented to reverse seagrass loss and enhance their fundamental role in coastal ocean habitats. Here we propose that seagrass meadows globally face a series of significant common challenges that must be addressed from a multifaceted and interdisciplinary perspective in order to achieve global conservation of seagrass meadows. The six main global challenges to seagrass conservation are (1) a lack of awareness of what seagrasses are and a limited societal recognition of the importance of seagrasses in coastal systems; (2) the status of many seagrass meadows are unknown, and up-to-date information on status and condition is essential; (3) understanding threatening activities at local scales is required to target management actions accordingly; (4) expanding our understanding of interactions between the socio-economic and ecological elements of seagrass systems is essential to balance the needs of people and the planet; (5) seagrass research should be expanded to generate scientific inquiries that support conservation actions; (6) increased understanding of the linkages between seagrass and climate change is required to adapt conservation accordingly. We also explicitly outline a series of proposed policy actions that will enable the scientific and conservation community to rise to these challenges. We urge the seagrass conservation community to engage stakeholders from local resource users to international policy-makers to address the challenges outlined here, in order to secure the future of the world’s seagrass ecosystems and maintain the vital services which they supply.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369424 (URN)10.1007/s13280-018-1115-y (DOI)000469438600001 ()30456457 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Jahnke, M., Gullstrom, M., Larsson, J., Asplund, M. E., Mgeleka, S., Silas, M. O., . . . Nordlund, L. M. (2019). Population genetic structure and connectivity of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Western Indian Ocean is influenced by predominant ocean currents. Ecology and Evolution, 9(16), 8953-8964
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population genetic structure and connectivity of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Western Indian Ocean is influenced by predominant ocean currents
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2019 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, no 16, p. 8953-8964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study is the first large-scale genetic population study of a widespread climax species of seagrass, Thalassia hemprichii, in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO). The aim was to understand genetic population structure and connectivity of T. hemprichii in relation to hydrodynamic features. We genotyped 205 individual seagrass shoots from 11 sites across the WIO, spanning over a distance of similar to 2,700 km, with twelve microsatellite markers. Seagrass shoots were sampled in Kenya, Tanzania (mainland and Zanzibar), Mozambique, and Madagascar: 4-26 degrees S and 33-48 degrees E. We assessed clonality and visualized genetic diversity and genetic population differentiation. We used Bayesian clustering approaches (TESS) to trace spatial ancestry of populations and used directional migration rates (DivMigrate) to identify sources of gene flow. We identified four genetically differentiated groups: (a) samples from the Zanzibar channel; (b) Mozambique; (c) Madagascar; and (d) the east coast of Zanzibar and Kenya. Significant pairwise population genetic differentiation was found among many sites. Isolation by distance was detected for the estimated magnitude of divergence (D-EST), but the three predominant ocean current systems (i.e., East African Coastal Current, North East Madagascar Current, and the South Equatorial Current) also determine genetic connectivity and genetic structure. Directional migration rates indicate that Madagascar acts as an important source population. Overall, clonality was moderate to high with large differences among sampling sites, indicating relatively low, but spatially variable sexual reproduction rates. The strongest genetic break was identified for three sites in the Zanzibar channel. Although isolation by distance is present, this study suggests that the three regionally predominant ocean current systems (i.e., East African Coastal Current, North East Madagascar Current, and the South Equatorial Current) rather than distance determine genetic connectivity and structure of T. hemprichii in the WIO. If the goal is to maintain genetic connectivity of T. hemprichii within the WIO, conservation planning and implementation of marine protection should be considered at the regional scale-across national borders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
coastal conservation, connectivity, dispersal, gene flow, genetic structure, microsatellite, ocean current, population genetics, seagrass, Western Indian Ocean
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396133 (URN)10.1002/ece3.5420 (DOI)000477501600001 ()31462994 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-1288
Available from: 2019-11-08 Created: 2019-11-08 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Duffy, J. E., Benedetti-Cecchi, L., Trinanes, J., Muller-Karger, F. E., Ambo-Rappe, R., Boström, C., . . . Yaakub, S. M. (2019). Toward a Coordinated Global Observing System for Seagrasses and Marine Macroalgae. Frontiers in Marine Science, 6, Article ID 317.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a Coordinated Global Observing System for Seagrasses and Marine Macroalgae
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 6, article id 317Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In coastal waters around the world, the dominant primary producers are benthic macrophytes, including seagrasses and macroalgae, that provide habitat structure and food for diverse and abundant biological communities and drive ecosystem processes. Seagrass meadows and macroalgal forests play key roles for coastal societies, contributing to fishery yields, storm protection, biogeochemical cycling and storage, and important cultural values. These socio-economically valuable services are threatened worldwide by human activities, with substantial areas of seagrass and macroalgal forests lost over the last half-century. Tracking the status and trends in marine macrophyte cover and quality is an emerging priority for ocean and coastal management, but doing so has been challenged by limited coordination across the numerous efforts to monitor macrophytes, which vary widely in goals, methodologies, scales, capacity, governance approaches, and data availability. Here, we present a consensus assessment and recommendations on the current state of and opportunities for advancing global marine macrophyte observations, integrating contributions from a community of researchers with broad geographic and disciplinary expertise. With the increasing scale of human impacts, the time is ripe to harmonize marine macrophyte observations by building on existing networks and identifying a core set of common metrics and approaches in sampling design, field measurements, governance, capacity building, and data management. We recommend a tiered observation system, with improvement of remote sensing and remote underwater imaging to expand capacity to capture broad-scale extent at intervals of several years, coordinated with strati fied in situ sampling annually to characterize the key variables of cover and taxonomic or functional group composition, and to provide ground-truth. A robust networked system of macrophyte observations will be facilitated by establishing best practices, including standard protocols, documentation, and sharing of resources at all stages of work flow, and secure archiving of open-access data. Because such a network is necessarily distributed, sustaining it depends on close engagement of local stakeholders and focusing on building and long-term maintenance of local capacity, particularly in the developing world. Realizing these recommendations will producemore effective, efficient, and responsive observing, a more accurate global picture of change in vegetated coastal systems, and stronger international capacity for sustaining observations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
biodiversity, seagrass, network, macroalgae, biodiversity observation network (BON), essential ocean variables (EOV)
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390428 (URN)10.3389/fmars.2019.00317 (DOI)000473765200001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
van Keulen, M., Nordlund, L. M. & Cullen-Unsworth, L. C. (2018). Towards recognition of seagrasses, and their sustainable management. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 134, 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards recognition of seagrasses, and their sustainable management
2018 (English)In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 134, p. 1-4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Seagrass, interdisciplinary research, ecosystem services, restoration, resilience, optimism
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364040 (URN)10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.08.046 (DOI)000447116800001 ()30236411 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4450-2331

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