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Ahmad, Shafqat
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Baldanzi, G., Sayols-Baixeras, S., Ekblom-Bak, E., Ekblom, Ö., Dekkers, K. F., Hammar, U., . . . Fall, T. (2024). Accelerometer-based physical activity is associated with the gut microbiota in 8416 individuals in SCAPIS. EBioMedicine, 100, Article ID 104989.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accelerometer-based physical activity is associated with the gut microbiota in 8416 individuals in SCAPIS
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2024 (English)In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 100, article id 104989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Previous population-based studies investigating the relationship between physical activity and the gut microbiota have relied on self-reported activity, prone to reporting bias. Here, we investigated the associations of accelerometer-based sedentary (SED), moderate-intensity (MPA), and vigorous-intensity (VPA) physical activity with the gut microbiota using cross-sectional data from the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage Study.

Methods

In 8416 participants aged 50–65, time in SED, MPA, and VPA were estimated with hip-worn accelerometer. Gut microbiota was profiled using shotgun metagenomics of faecal samples. We applied multivariable regression models, adjusting for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and technical covariates, and accounted for multiple testing.

Findings

Overall, associations between time in SED and microbiota species abundance were in opposite direction to those for MPA or VPA. For example, MPA was associated with lower, while SED with higher abundance of Escherichia coli. MPA and VPA were associated with higher abundance of the butyrate-producers Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Roseburia spp. We observed discrepancies between specific VPA and MPA associations, such as a positive association between MPA and Prevotella copri, while no association was detected for VPA. Additionally, SED, MPA and VPA were associated with the functional potential of the microbiome. For instance, MPA was associated with higher capacity for acetate synthesis and SED with lower carbohydrate degradation capacity.

Interpretation

Our findings suggest that sedentary and physical activity are associated with a similar set of gut microbiota species but in opposite directions. Furthermore, the intensity of physical activity may have specific effects on certain gut microbiota species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Accelerometery, Gastrointestinal microbiome, Exercise, Sedentary behaviour, Epidemiology
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-522177 (URN)10.1016/j.ebiom.2024.104989 (DOI)001180180700001 ()38301483 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-02-01 Created: 2024-02-01 Last updated: 2024-04-09Bibliographically approved
Ahmad, S., Moorthy, M. V., Lee, I.-M., Ridker, P. M., Manson, J. E., Buring, J. E., . . . Mora, S. (2024). Mediterranean Diet Adherence and Risk of All-Cause Mortality in Women. JAMA Network Open, 7(5), Article ID e2414322.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediterranean Diet Adherence and Risk of All-Cause Mortality in Women
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2024 (English)In: JAMA Network Open, E-ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e2414322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality, but data on underlying molecular mechanisms over long follow-up are limited. Objectives To investigate Mediterranean diet adherence and risk of all-cause mortality and to examine the relative contribution of cardiometabolic factors to this risk reduction. Design, Setting, and Participants This cohort study included initially healthy women from the Women's Health Study, who had provided blood samples, biomarker measurements, and dietary information. Baseline data included self-reported demographics and a validated food-frequency questionnaire. The data collection period was from April 1993 to January 1996, and data analysis took place from June 2018 to November 2023. Exposures Mediterranean diet score (range, 0-9) was computed based on 9 dietary components. Main Outcome and Measures Thirty-three blood biomarkers, including traditional and novel lipid, lipoprotein, apolipoprotein, inflammation, insulin resistance, and metabolism measurements, were evaluated at baseline using standard assays and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mortality and cause of death were determined from medical and death records. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for Mediterranean diet adherence and mortality risk, and mediation analyses were used to calculate the mediated effect of different biomarkers in understanding this association. Results Among 25 315 participants, the mean (SD) baseline age was 54.6 (7.1) years, with 329 (1.3%) Asian women, 406 (1.6%) Black women, 240 (0.9%) Hispanic women, 24 036 (94.9%) White women, and 95 (0.4%) women with other race and ethnicity; the median (IQR) Mediterranean diet adherence score was 4.0 (3.0-5.0). Over a mean (SD) of 24.7 (4.8) years of follow-up, 3879 deaths occurred. Compared with low Mediterranean diet adherence (score 0-3), adjusted risk reductions were observed for middle (score 4-5) and upper (score 6-9) groups, with HRs of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.78-0.90) and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.70-0.84), respectively (P for trend < .001). Further adjusting for lifestyle factors attenuated the risk reductions, but they remained statistically significant (middle adherence group: HR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.85-0.99]; upper adherence group: HR, 0.89 [95% CI, 0.82-0.98]; P for trend = .001). Of the biomarkers examined, small molecule metabolites and inflammatory biomarkers contributed most to the lower mortality risk (explaining 14.8% and 13.0%, respectively, of the association), followed by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (10.2%), body mass index (10.2%), and insulin resistance (7.4%). Other pathways, including branched-chain amino acids, high-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, glycemic measures, and hypertension, had smaller contributions (<3%). Conclusions and Relevance In this cohort study, higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with 23% lower risk of all-cause mortality. This inverse association was partially explained by multiple cardiometabolic factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association (AMA), 2024
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-534813 (URN)10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2024.14322 (DOI)001236356900002 ()38819819 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2022-01460Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-00989
Available from: 2024-07-10 Created: 2024-07-10 Last updated: 2024-07-10Bibliographically approved
Baldanzi, G., Sayols-Baixeras, S., Theorell-Haglöw, J., Dekkers, K. F., Hammar, U., Nguyen, D., . . . Fall, T. (2023). OSA Is Associated With the Human Gut Microbiota Composition and Functional Potential in the Population-Based Swedish CardioPulmonary bioImage Study. Chest, 164(2), 503-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>OSA Is Associated With the Human Gut Microbiota Composition and Functional Potential in the Population-Based Swedish CardioPulmonary bioImage Study
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2023 (English)In: Chest, ISSN 0012-3692, E-ISSN 1931-3543, Vol. 164, no 2, p. 503-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-breathing disorder linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Intermittent hypoxia and intermittent airway obstruction, hallmarks of OSA, have been shown in animal models to induce substantial changes to the gut microbiota composition and subsequent transplantation of fecal matter to other animals induced changes in blood pressure and glucose metabolism.

RESEARCH QUESTION: Does obstructive sleep apnea in adults associate with the composition and metabolic potential of the human gut microbiota?

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We used respiratory polygraphy data from up to 3,570 individuals aged 50-64 from the population-based Swedish CardioPulmonary bioImage Study combined with deep shotgun metagenomics of fecal samples to identify cross-sectional associations between three OSA parameters covering apneas and hypopneas, cumulative sleep time in hypoxia and number of oxygen desaturation events with gut microbiota composition. Data collection about potential confounders was based on questionnaires, on-site anthropometric measurements, plasma metabolomics, and linkage with the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

RESULTS: We found that all three OSA parameters were associated with lower diversity of species in the gut. Further, the OSA-related hypoxia parameters were in multivariable-adjusted analysis associated with the relative abundance of 128 gut bacterial species, including higher abundance of Blautia obeum and Collinsela aerofaciens. The latter species was also independently associated with increased systolic blood pressure. Further, the cumulative time in hypoxia during sleep was associated with the abundance of genes involved in nine gut microbiota metabolic pathways, including propionate production from lactate. Lastly, we observed two heterogeneous sets of plasma metabolites with opposite association with species positively and negatively associated with hypoxia parameters, respectively.

INTERPRETATION: OSA-related hypoxia, but not the number of apneas/hypopneas, is associated with specific gut microbiota species and functions. Our findings lay the foundation for future research on the gut microbiota-mediated health effects of OSA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
epidemiology, microbiota, obstructive sleep apnea
National Category
Microbiology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-498595 (URN)10.1016/j.chest.2023.03.010 (DOI)001109126800001 ()36925044 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC-STG-2018-801965EU, European Research Council, ERC-CoG-2014-649021EU, European Research Council, ERC-STG-2015-679242Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 2019-0505Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 2020-0485Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 2018-0343Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 2020-0711Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 2020-0173Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 2019-0526Swedish Research Council, 2019-01471Swedish Research Council, 2018-02784Swedish Research Council, 2019-01015Swedish Research Council, 2020-00243Swedish Research Council, 2019-01236Swedish Research Council, 2021-02273Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-00989Novo NordiskGöran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of TechnologyKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationVinnovaUniversity of GothenburgKarolinska InstituteRegion StockholmLinköpings universitetLund UniversityUmeå UniversityUppsala University
Available from: 2023-03-17 Created: 2023-03-17 Last updated: 2023-12-14Bibliographically approved
Sayols-Baixeras, S., Dekkers, K., Baldanzi, G., Jönsson, D., Hammar, U., Lin, Y.-T., . . . Fall, T. (2023). Streptococcus Species Abundance in the Gut Is Linked to Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in 8973 Participants From the SCAPIS Cohort. Circulation, 148(6), 459-472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Streptococcus Species Abundance in the Gut Is Linked to Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in 8973 Participants From the SCAPIS Cohort
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2023 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 148, no 6, p. 459-472Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Gut microbiota have been implicated in atherosclerotic disease, but their relation with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis is unclear. This study aimed to identify associations between the gut microbiome and computed tomography-based measures of coronary atherosclerosis and to explore relevant clinical correlates.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 8973 participants (50 to 65 years of age) without overt atherosclerotic disease from the population-based SCAPIS (Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study). Coronary atherosclerosis was measured using coronary artery calcium score and coronary computed tomography angiography. Gut microbiota species abundance and functional potential were assessed with shotgun metagenomics sequencing of stool, and associations with coronary atherosclerosis were evaluated with multivariable regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Associated species were evaluated for association with inflammatory markers, metabolites, and corresponding species in saliva.

Results: The mean age of the study sample was 57.4 years, and 53.7% were female. Coronary artery calcification was detected in 40.3%, and 5.4% had at least 1 stenosis with >50% occlusion. Sixty-four species were associated with coronary artery calcium score independent of cardiovascular risk factors, with the strongest associations observed for Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus oralis subsp oralis (P<1×10-5). Associations were largely similar across coronary computed tomography angiography-based measurements. Out of the 64 species, 19 species, including streptococci and other species commonly found in the oral cavity, were associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein plasma concentrations, and 16 with neutrophil counts. Gut microbial species that are commonly found in the oral cavity were negatively associated with plasma indole propionate and positively associated with plasma secondary bile acids and imidazole propionate. Five species, including 3 streptococci, correlated with the same species in saliva and were associated with worse dental health in the Malmö Offspring Dental Study. Microbial functional potential of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, anaerobic fatty acid β-oxidation, and amino acid degradation were associated with coronary artery calcium score.

Conclusions: This study provides evidence of an association of a gut microbiota composition characterized by increased abundance of Streptococcus spp and other species commonly found in the oral cavity with coronary atherosclerosis and systemic inflammation markers. Further longitudinal and experimental studies are warranted to explore the potential implications of a bacterial component in atherogenesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2023
Keywords
Streptococcus, atherosclerosis, gastrointestinal microbiome, metagenomics, tomography
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Clinical Physiology; Clinical Bacteriology; Infectious Diseases; Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-507833 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.123.063914 (DOI)001048683000002 ()37435755 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC-2018-STG-8019 65EU, European Research Council, ERC-CoG-2014-649 021EU, European Research Council, ERC-STG-2015-679242Swedish Research Council, 2019-01471Swedish Research Council, 2018-02784
Available from: 2023-07-13 Created: 2023-07-13 Last updated: 2023-09-04Bibliographically approved
Lind, L., Ahmad, S., Elmståhl, S. & Fall, T. (2023). The metabolic profile of waist to hip ratio-A multi-cohort study. PLOS ONE, 18(2), Article ID e0282433.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The metabolic profile of waist to hip ratio-A multi-cohort study
2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 2, article id e0282433Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The genetic background of general obesity and fat distribution is different, pointing to separate underlying physiology. Here, we searched for metabolites and lipoprotein particles associated with fat distribution, measured as waist/hip ratio adjusted for fat mass (WHRadjfatmass), and general adiposity measured as percentage fat mass.

METHOD: The sex-stratified association of 791 metabolites detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and 91 lipoprotein particles measured by nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (NMR) with WHRadjfatmass and fat mass were assessed using three population-based cohorts: EpiHealth (n = 2350) as discovery cohort, with PIVUS (n = 603) and POEM (n = 502) as replication cohorts.

RESULTS: Of the 193 LC-MS-metabolites being associated with WHRadjfatmass in EpiHealth (false discovery rate (FDR) <5%), 52 were replicated in a meta-analysis of PIVUS and POEM. Nine metabolites, including ceramides, sphingomyelins or glycerophosphatidylcholines, were inversely associated with WHRadjfatmass in both sexes. Two of the sphingomyelins (d18:2/24:1, d18:1/24:2 and d18:2/24:2) were not associated with fat mass (p>0.50). Out of 91, 82 lipoprotein particles were associated with WHRadjfatmass in EpiHealth and 42 were replicated. Fourteen of those were associated in both sexes and belonged to very-large or large HDL particles, all being inversely associated with both WHRadjfatmass and fat mass.

CONCLUSION: Two sphingomyelins were inversely linked to body fat distribution in both men and women without being associated with fat mass, while very-large and large HDL particles were inversely associated with both fat distribution and fat mass. If these metabolites represent a link between an impaired fat distribution and cardiometabolic diseases remains to be established.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2023
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-497854 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0282433 (DOI)000996122900004 ()36848351 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-03-03 Created: 2023-03-03 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Dekkers, K., Sayols-Baixeras, S., Baldanzi, G., Nowak, C., Hammar, U., Nguyen, D., . . . Fall, T. (2022). An online atlas of human plasma metabolite signatures of gut microbiome composition. Nature Communications, 13(1), Article ID 5370.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An online atlas of human plasma metabolite signatures of gut microbiome composition
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2022 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 5370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human gut microbiota produce a variety of molecules, some of which enter the bloodstream and impact health. Conversely, dietary or pharmacological compounds may affect the microbiota before entering the circulation. Characterization of these interactions is an important step towards understanding the effects of the gut microbiota on health. In this cross-sectional study, we used deep metagenomic sequencing and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography linked to mass spectrometry for a detailed characterization of the gut microbiota and plasma metabolome, respectively, of 8583 participants invited at age 50 to 64 from the population-based Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage Study. Here, we find that the gut microbiota explain up to 58% of the variance of individual plasma metabolites and we present 997 associations between alpha diversity and plasma metabolites and 546,819 associations between specific gut metagenomic species and plasma metabolites in an online atlas (https://gutsyatlas.serve.scilifelab.se/). We exemplify the potential of this resource by presenting novel associations between dietary factors and oral medication with the gut microbiome, and microbial species strongly associated with the uremic toxin p-cresol sulfate. This resource can be used as the basis for targeted studies of perturbation of specific metabolites and for identification of candidate plasma biomarkers of gut microbiota composition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-486343 (URN)10.1038/s41467-022-33050-0 (DOI)000857704600008 ()36151114 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-10-11 Created: 2022-10-11 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Ahmad, S., Hammar, U., Kennedy, B., Salihovic, S., Ganna, A., Lind, L., . . . Fall, T. (2022). Effect of General Adiposity and Central Body Fat Distribution on the Circulating Metabolome: A Multi-Cohort Nontargeted Metabolomics Observational and Mendelian Randomization Study. Diabetes, 71(2), 329-339
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of General Adiposity and Central Body Fat Distribution on the Circulating Metabolome: A Multi-Cohort Nontargeted Metabolomics Observational and Mendelian Randomization Study
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2022 (English)In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 329-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Obesity is associated with adverse health outcomes, but the metabolic effects have not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the association between adiposity with circulating metabolites and to address causality with Mendelian randomization (MR). Metabolomics data was generated by non-targeted ultra-performance liquid-chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass-spectrometry in plasma and serum from three population-based Swedish cohorts: ULSAM (N=1,135), PIVUS (N=970), and TwinGene (N=2,059). We assessed associations between general adiposity measured as body mass index (BMI) and central body fat distribution measured as waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRadjBMI) with 210 annotated metabolites. We employed MR analysis to assess causal effects. Lastly, we attempted to replicate the MR findings in the KORA and TwinsUK cohorts (N=7,373), the CHARGE consortium (N=8,631), the Framingham Heart Study (N=2,076) and the DIRECT consortium (N=3,029). BMI was associated with 77 metabolites, while WHRadjBMI was associated with 11 and 3 metabolites in women and men, respectively. The MR analyses in the Swedish cohorts suggested a causal association (p-value <0.05) of increased general adiposity and reduced levels of arachidonic acid, dodecanedioic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine (P-16:0) as well as with increased creatine levels. The replication effort provided support for a causal association of adiposity on reduced levels of arachidonic acid (p-value 0.03). Adiposity is associated with variation of large parts of the circulating metabolome, however causality needs further investigation in well-powered cohorts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Diabetes Association, 2022
Keywords
Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Internal Medicine
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-460378 (URN)10.2337/db20-1120 (DOI)000891579900013 ()34785567 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03477Swedish Research Council, 2018-02784Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20170988Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-00989EU, European Research Council, GUTSY - 801965Swedish Research Council, 2017-00641Göran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of TechnologyUppsala UniversityThe Royal Swedish Academy of SciencesSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), sens2017131Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), sens2018587
Available from: 2021-12-06 Created: 2021-12-06 Last updated: 2022-12-19Bibliographically approved
Rukh, G., Ahmad, S., Lind, L. & Schioth, H. B. (2022). Evidence of a Causal Link Between the Well-Being Spectrum and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction: A Mendelian Randomization Study. Frontiers in Genetics, 13, Article ID 842223.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence of a Causal Link Between the Well-Being Spectrum and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction: A Mendelian Randomization Study
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Genetics, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 13, article id 842223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epidemiological studies have provided extensive evidence regarding the role of psychological risk factors in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but whether these associations are causal in nature is still unknown. We aimed to investigate whether the association between the wellbeing spectrum (WBS; derived from four psychological traits including life satisfaction, positive affect, neuroticism, and depressive symptoms) and CVD risk is causal. By employing a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach, the effect of the WBS on four CVD outcomes, including atrial fibrillation, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke, was investigated. The genetically predicted WBS was associated with 38% lower risk for heart failure (odds ratio (OR): 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50-0.78; P: 2.2 x 10(-5)) and 40% reduced risk of myocardial infarction (OR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.47-0.78; P: 1.1 x 10(-4)). Of the WBS constituent traits, only depressive symptoms showed a positive causal association with heart failure and myocardial infarction. Neither WBS nor WBS constituent traits were associated with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke. In multivariable MR analyses, when genetic instruments for traditional CVD risk factors were also taken into consideration, the WBS was causally associated with a reduced risk for heart failure (OR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.58-0.88; P: 0.001) and myocardial infarction (OR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.52-0.86; P: 0.002). This study provides evidence that a higher WBS is causally associated with a decreased risk of developing CVD and, more specifically, myocardial infarction; moreover, the association is mainly driven by depressive symptoms. These results support current guidelines that suggest improving psychological wellbeing may help in reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A.Frontiers Media SA, 2022
Keywords
wellbeing, cardiovascular disease, Mendelian randomization, depressive symptoms, neuroticism, positive affect, life satisfaction
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-475107 (URN)10.3389/fgene.2022.842223 (DOI)000795840500001 ()35571065 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20150711Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-00989
Available from: 2022-06-03 Created: 2022-06-03 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Ahmad, S., Arnlov, J. & Larsson, S. C. (2022). Genetically Predicted Circulating Copper and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study. Nutrients, 14(3), 509, Article ID 509.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetically Predicted Circulating Copper and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study
2022 (English)In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 509-, article id 509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Elevated circulating copper levels have been associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), kidney damage, and decline in kidney function. Using a two sample Mendelian randomization approach where copper-associated genetic variants were used as instrumental variables, genetically predicted higher circulating copper levels were associated with higher CKD prevalence (odds ratio 1.17; 95% confidence interval 1.04, 1.32; p-value = 0.009). There was suggestive evidence that genetically predicted higher copper was associated with a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and a more rapid kidney damage decline. In conclusion, we observed that elevated circulating copper levels may be a causal risk factor for CKD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2022
Keywords
circulating nutrients, kidney related disease, estimated glomerular filtration rate, Mendelian randomization
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-469068 (URN)10.3390/nu14030509 (DOI)000755544500001 ()
Available from: 2022-03-04 Created: 2022-03-04 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Ahmad, S., Carrasquilla, G., Langner, T., Menzel, U., Malmberg, F., Hammar, U., . . . Fall, T. (2022). Genetics of liver fat and volume associate with altered metabolism and whole body magnetic resonance imaging. Journal of Hepatology, 77, S40-S40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetics of liver fat and volume associate with altered metabolism and whole body magnetic resonance imaging
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 77, p. S40-S40Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-489454 (URN)10.1016/s0168-8278(22)00491-3 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-11-30 Created: 2022-11-30 Last updated: 2023-01-10Bibliographically approved
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