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Godina, C., Belting, M., Vallon-Christersson, J., Isaksson, K., Bosch, A. & Jernström, H. (2024). Caveolin-1 gene expression provides additional prognostic information combined with PAM50 risk of recurrence (ROR) score in breast cancer. Scientific Reports, 14, Article ID 6675.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caveolin-1 gene expression provides additional prognostic information combined with PAM50 risk of recurrence (ROR) score in breast cancer
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2024 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, article id 6675Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Combining information from the tumor microenvironment (TME) with PAM50 Risk of Recurrence (ROR) score could improve breast cancer prognostication. Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is a marker of an active TME. CAV1 is a membrane protein involved in cell signaling, extracellular matrix organization, and tumor-stroma interactions. We sought to investigate CAV1 gene expression in relation to PAM50 subtypes, ROR score, and their joint prognostic impact. CAV1 expression was compared between PAM50 subtypes and ROR categories in two cohorts (SCAN-B, n = 5326 and METABRIC, n = 1980). CAV1 expression was assessed in relation to clinical outcomes using Cox regression and adjusted for clinicopathological predictors. Effect modifications between CAV1 expression and ROR categories on clinical outcome were investigated using multiplicative and additive two-way interaction analyses. Differential gene expression and gene set enrichment analyses were applied to compare high and low expressing CAV1 tumors. All samples expressed CAV1 with the highest expression in the Normal-like subtype. Gene modules consistent with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), hypoxia, and stromal activation were associated with high CAV1 expression. CAV1 expression was inversely associated with ROR category. Interactions between CAV1 expression and ROR categories were observed in both cohorts. High expressing CAV1 tumors conferred worse prognosis only within the group classified as ROR high. ROR gave markedly different prognostic information depending on the underlying CAV1 expression. CAV1, a potential mediator between the malignant cells and TME, could be a useful biomarker that enhances and further refines PAM50 ROR risk stratification in patients with ROR high tumors and a potential therapeutic target.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
Keywords
Caveolin-1, Breast cancer, Molecular profiling, Prognostic markers, PAM50 ROR
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-527042 (URN)10.1038/s41598-024-57365-8 (DOI)001192455600062 ()38509243 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-04-26 Created: 2024-04-26 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Ehinger, E., Kopecky, J., Darabi, A., Visse, E., Edvardsson, C., Tomasevic, G., . . . Siesjö, P. (2023). Antisecretory factor is safe to use as add-on treatment in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. BMC Neurology, 23(1), Article ID 76.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antisecretory factor is safe to use as add-on treatment in newly diagnosed glioblastoma
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2023 (English)In: BMC Neurology, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Despite the best available treatment, prognosis remains poor. Current standard therapy consists of surgical removal of the tumor followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ). Experimental studies suggest that antisecretory factor (AF), an endogenous protein with proposed antisecretory and anti-inflammatory properties, may potentiate the effect of TMZ and alleviate cerebral edema. Salovum is an egg yolk powder enriched for AF and is classified as a medical food in the European Union. In this pilot study, we evaluate the safety and feasibility of add-on Salovum in GBM patients.

Methods

Eight patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed GBM were prescribed Salovum during concomitant radiochemotherapy. Safety was determined by the number of treatment-related adverse events. Feasibility was determined by the number of patients who completed the full prescribed Salovum treatment.

Results

No serious treatment-related adverse events were observed. Out of 8 included patients, 2 did not complete the full treatment. Only one of the dropouts was due to issues directly related to Salovum, which were nausea and loss of appetite. Median survival was 23 months.

Conclusions

We conclude that Salovum is safe to use as an add-on treatment for GBM. In terms of feasibility, adherence to the treatment regimen requires a determined and independent patient as the large doses prescribed may cause nausea and loss of appetite.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Glioblastoma, Antisecretory factor, Novel treatments against glioblastoma, Salovum
National Category
Neurology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-498443 (URN)10.1186/s12883-023-03119-4 (DOI)000936860300001 ()36803465 (PubMedID)
Funder
Lund UniversitySjöberg FoundationRegion SkåneEU, Horizon 2020, h2020-MSCA-Cofund-754299
Available from: 2023-03-16 Created: 2023-03-16 Last updated: 2023-03-16Bibliographically approved
Godina, C., Tryggvadottir, H., Bosch, A., Borgquist, S., Belting, M., Isaksson, K. & Jernström, H. (2023). Caveolin-1 genotypes as predictor for locoregional recurrence and contralateral disease in breast cancer. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 199(2), 335-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caveolin-1 genotypes as predictor for locoregional recurrence and contralateral disease in breast cancer
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2023 (English)In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 199, no 2, p. 335-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Caveolin-1 (CAV1) has been implicated in breast cancer oncogenesis and metastasis and may be a potential prognosticator, especially for non-distant events. CAV1 functions as a master regulator of membrane transport and cell signaling. Several CAV1 SNPs have been linked to multiple cancers, but the prognostic impact of CAV1 SNPs in breast cancer remains unclear. Here, we investigated CAV1 polymorphisms in relation to clinical outcomes in breast cancer.

Methods

A cohort of 1017 breast cancer patients (inclusion 2002–2012, Sweden) were genotyped using Oncoarray by Ilumina. Patients were followed for up to 15 years. Five out of six CAV1 SNPs (rs10256914, rs959173, rs3807989, rs3815412, and rs8713) passed quality control and were used for haplotype construction. CAV1 genotypes and haplotypes in relation to clinical outcomes were assessed with Cox regression and adjusted for potential confounders (age, tumor characteristics, and adjuvant treatments).

Results

Only one SNP was associated with lymph node status, no other SNPs or haplotypes were associated with tumor characteristics. The CAV1 rs3815412 CC genotype (5.8% of patients) was associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer, adjusted hazard ratio (HRadj) 4.26 (95% CI 1.86–9.73). Moreover, the TTACA haplotype (13% of patients) conferred an increased risk for locoregional recurrence HRadj 2.24 (95% CI 1.24–4.04). No other genotypes or haplotypes were associated with clinical outcome.

Conclusion

CAV1 polymorphisms were associated with increased risk for locoregional recurrence and contralateral breast cancer. These findings may identify patients that could derive benefit from more tailored treatment to prevent non-distant events, if confirmed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Caveolin-1, Genotype, Locoregional breast cancer recurrence, Contralateral breast cancer
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-523246 (URN)10.1007/s10549-023-06919-x (DOI)000963684800002 ()37017811 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 20 0763Lund UniversityMrs. Berta Kamprad's Cancer FoundationRegion Skåne, 40620
Available from: 2024-02-16 Created: 2024-02-16 Last updated: 2024-02-16Bibliographically approved
Jujic, A., Godina, C., Belting, M., Melander, O., Holst, J. J., Ahlqvist, E., . . . Magnusson, M. (2023). Endogenous incretin levels and risk of first incident cancer: a prospective cohort study. Scientific Reports, 13, Article ID 382.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Endogenous incretin levels and risk of first incident cancer: a prospective cohort study
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2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, article id 382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concerns have been raised regarding a potentially increased risk of cancer associated with treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. Here, we explored whether fasting and oral glucose tolerance test post-challenge glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and GLP-1 levels were associated with incident first cancer. Within the cardiovascular re-examination arm of the population-based Malmo Diet Cancer study (n = 3734), 685 participants with a previous cancer diagnosis were excluded, resulting in 3049 participants (mean age 72.2 +/- 5.6 years, 59.5% women), of whom 485 were diagnosed with incident first cancer (median follow-up time 9.9 years). Multivariable Cox-regression and competing risk regression (death as competing risk) were used to explore associations between incretin levels and incident first cancer. Higher levels of fasting GLP-1 (462 incident first cancer cases/2417 controls) showed lower risk of incident first cancer in competing risk regression (sub-hazard ratio 0.90; 95% confidence interval 0.82-0.99; p = 0.022). No association was seen for fasting GIP, post-challenge GIP, or post-challenge GLP-1 and incident first cancer. In this prospective study, none of the fasting and post-challenge levels of GIP and GLP-1 were associated with higher risk of incident first cancer; by contrast, higher levels of fasting GLP-1 were associated with lower risk of incident first cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-503658 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-27509-3 (DOI)000984279900030 ()36611045 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-06-09 Created: 2023-06-09 Last updated: 2023-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bendahl, P.-O., Belting, M. & Gezelius, E. (2023). Longitudinal Assessment of Circulating Tumor Cells and Outcome in Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Sub-Study of RASTEN-A Randomized Trial with Low Molecular Weight Heparin. Cancers, 15(12), Article ID 3176.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal Assessment of Circulating Tumor Cells and Outcome in Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Sub-Study of RASTEN-A Randomized Trial with Low Molecular Weight Heparin
2023 (English)In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 15, no 12, article id 3176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simple Summary Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung cancer subtype associated with an overall poor prognosis but a variable response rate to chemotherapy. The measurement of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offers a non-invasive method to monitor the disease and may provide prognostic information as potential guidance to clinicians in the management of SCLC. However, the value of CTCs during and after chemotherapy appears inconclusive. Here, we show that the detection of CTCs at baseline correlates to overall survival in SCLC, and that persistently detectable CTCs after completion of treatment adds further prognostic value. This suggests that repetitive analysis of CTCs during and after the course of treatment may have a role in the management of SCLC, warranting further studies. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may provide a liquid biopsy approach to disease monitoring in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), a particularly aggressive tumor subtype. Yet, the prognostic role of CTCs during and after treatment in relation to baseline remains ill-defined. Here, we assessed the value of longitudinal CTC analysis and the potential of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) to reduce CTC abundance in SCLC patients from a randomized trial (RASTEN). Blood samples were collected at baseline, before chemotherapy Cycle 3, and at 2-month follow-up from 42 patients in total, and CTCs were quantified using the FDA-approved CellSearch system. We found a gradual decline in CTC count during and after treatment, independently of the addition of LMWH to standard therapy. Detectable CTCs at baseline correlated significantly to reduced survival compared to undetectable CTCs (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 2.75 (95% CI 1.05-7.20; p = 0.040)). Furthermore, a persistent CTC count at 2-month follow-up was associated with a HR of 4.22 (95% CI 1.20-14.91; p = 0.025). Our findings indicate that persistently detectable CTCs during and after completion of therapy offer further prognostic information in addition to baseline CTC, suggesting a role for CTC in the individualized management of SCLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
small cell lung cancer, liquid biopsy, circulating tumor cells, prognostic biomarker
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-508056 (URN)10.3390/cancers15123176 (DOI)001014216200001 ()37370786 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-07-20 Created: 2023-07-20 Last updated: 2023-07-20Bibliographically approved
Slipsager, A., Henrichsen, S. N., Falkmer, U. G., Dybkaer, K., Belting, M. & Poulsen, L. Ø. (2023). Predictive biomarkers in radioresistant rectal cancer: A systematic review. Critical reviews in oncology/hematology, 186, Article ID 103991.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive biomarkers in radioresistant rectal cancer: A systematic review
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2023 (English)In: Critical reviews in oncology/hematology, ISSN 1040-8428, E-ISSN 1879-0461, Vol. 186, article id 103991Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims

The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer often consists of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. However, approximately 15% of patients show no response to this neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. This systematic review aimed to identify biomarkers of innate radioresistant rectal cancer.

Method

Through a systematic literature search, 125 papers were included and analyzed using ROBINS-I, a Cochrane risk of bias tool for non-randomized studies of interventions. Both statistically significant and nonsignificant biomarkers were identified. Biomarkers mentioned more than once in the results or biomarkers with a low or moderate risk of bias were included as the final results.

Results

Thirteen unique biomarkers, three genetic signatures, one specific pathway, and two combinations of two or four biomarkers were identified. In particular, the connection between HMGCS2, COASY, and PI3K-pathway seems promising. Future scientific research should focus on further validating these genetic resistance markers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Rectal Neoplasms, Neoadjuvant therapy, Radiotherapy, Molecular biomarker, Resistance
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-509307 (URN)10.1016/j.critrevonc.2023.103991 (DOI)001040298800001 ()37059272 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-17 Created: 2023-08-17 Last updated: 2023-08-17Bibliographically approved
Cerezo-Magana, M., Bång-Rudenstam, A. & Belting, M. (2023). Proteoglycans: a common portal for SARS-CoV-2 and extracellular vesicle uptake. American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, 324(1), C76-C84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteoglycans: a common portal for SARS-CoV-2 and extracellular vesicle uptake
2023 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, ISSN 0363-6143, E-ISSN 1522-1563, Vol. 324, no 1, p. C76-C84Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As structural components of the glycocalyx, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are involved in multiple pathophysiological processes at the apex of cell signaling cascades, and as endocytosis receptors for particle structures, such as lipoproteins, extracellular vesicles, and enveloped viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. Given their diversity and complex biogenesis regulation, HSPGs remain understudied. Here we compile some of the latest studies focusing on HSPGs as internalizing receptors of extracellular vesicles ("endogenous virus") and SARS-CoV-2 lipid-enclosed particles and highlight similarities in their biophysical and structural characteristics. Specifically, the similarities in their biogenesis, size, and lipid composition may explain a common dependence on HSPGs for efficient cell-surface attachment and uptake. We further discuss the relative complexity of extracellular vesicle composition and the viral mechanisms that evolve towards increased infectivity that complicate therapeutic strategies addressing blockade of their uptake.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physiological SocietyAMERICAN PHYSIOLOGICAL SOCIEY, 2023
Keywords
cancer, COVID-19, extracellular vesicles, proteoglycans, SARS-CoV-2
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-500413 (URN)10.1152/ajpcell.00453.2022 (DOI)000957546100008 ()36458979 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR-MH 2018-02562Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 20 0745 PjFSwedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR2020-0129Mrs. Berta Kamprad's Cancer FoundationSjöberg Foundation
Available from: 2023-04-17 Created: 2023-04-17 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Pocas, J., Marques, C., Gomes, C., Otake, A. H., Pinto, F., Ferreira, M., . . . Magalhães, A. (2023). Syndecan-4 is a maestro of gastric cancer cell invasion and communication that underscores poor survival. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 120(20), Article ID e2214853120.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Syndecan-4 is a maestro of gastric cancer cell invasion and communication that underscores poor survival
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2023 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 120, no 20, article id e2214853120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gastric cancer is a dominating cause of cancer-associated mortality with limited therapeutic options. Here, we show that syndecan-4 (SDC4), a transmembrane pro-teoglycan, is highly expressed in intestinal subtype gastric tumors and that this sig -nature associates with patient poor survival. Further, we mechanistically demonstrate that SDC4 is a master regulator of gastric cancer cell motility and invasion. We also find that SDC4 decorated with heparan sulfate is efficiently sorted in extracellular vesicles (EVs). Interestingly, SDC4 in EVs regulates gastric cancer cell-derived EV organ distribution, uptake, and functional effects in recipient cells. Specifically, we show that SDC4 knockout disrupts the tropism of EVs for the common gastric cancer metastatic sites. Our findings set the basis for the molecular implications of SDC4 expression in gastric cancer cells and provide broader perspectives on the development of therapeutic strategies targeting the glycan-EV axis to limit tumor progression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), 2023
Keywords
syndecan-4, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, gastric cancer, vesicles, cancer cell invasion
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-509446 (URN)10.1073/pnas.2214853120 (DOI)001039036500003 ()37155874 (PubMedID)
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)
Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-21 Last updated: 2023-08-21Bibliographically approved
Gezelius, E., Bendahl, P.-O., Gallo, W., de Oliveira, K. G., Ek, L., Bergman, B., . . . Belting, M. (2022). Circulating Levels of the Cardiovascular Biomarkers ST2 and Adrenomedullin Predict Outcome within a Randomized Phase III Lung Cancer Trial (RASTEN). Cancers, 14(5), Article ID 1307.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating Levels of the Cardiovascular Biomarkers ST2 and Adrenomedullin Predict Outcome within a Randomized Phase III Lung Cancer Trial (RASTEN)
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2022 (English)In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 1307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simple Summary Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with small cell lung cancer, partly reflecting its high correlation with smoking. Cardiovascular comorbidities may limit patient tolerance to cytotoxic drugs, thereby influencing the choice and intensity of treatment and, ultimately, patient survival. In light of the challenges relating to assessing cardiovascular status clinically in newly diagnosed lung cancer, objective biomarkers of cardiovascular vulnerability are warranted. Here, we show that circulating levels of ST2, an established biomarker in heart failure, and adrenomedullin, a vasodilator peptide known to reflect several aspects of cardiovascular status, strongly correlate with survival in small cell lung cancer. Our data, which are based on a large, randomized trial cohort, suggest the potential use of cardiovascular biomarkers in guiding clinicians in making individualized treatment decisions. Cardiovascular comorbidity is common in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and may significantly affect treatment tolerability and patient outcome. Still, there are no established biomarkers for objective and dynamic assessment as a tool for improved treatment decisions. We have investigated circulating levels of midregional-pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), midregional-pro-atrial-natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), copeptin (surrogate for vasopressin) and suppression-of-tumorigenicity-2 (ST2), all known to correlate with various aspects of cardiovascular function, in a SCLC cohort (N = 252) from a randomized, controlled trial (RASTEN). For all measured biomarkers, protein levels were inversely associated with survival, particularly with ST2 and MR-proADM, where the top versus bottom quartile was associated with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.40 (95% CI 1.44-3.98; p = 0.001) and 2.18 (95% CI 1.35-3.51; p = 0.001), respectively, in the entire cohort, and 3.43 (95% CI 1.73-6.79; p < 0.001) and 3.49 (95% CI 1.84-6.60; p < 0.001), respectively, in extensive disease patients. A high combined score of MR-proADM and ST2 was associated with a significantly reduced median OS of 7.0 months vs. 14.9 months for patients with a low combined score. We conclude that the cardiovascular biomarkers MR-proADM and ST2 strongly correlate with survival in SCLC, warranting prospective studies on the clinical utility of MR-proADM and ST2 for improved, individualized treatment decisions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2022
Keywords
small cell lung cancer, cardiovascular biomarkers, individualized treatment
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-470580 (URN)10.3390/cancers14051307 (DOI)000768147400001 ()35267617 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-03-25 Created: 2022-03-25 Last updated: 2022-03-25Bibliographically approved
Li, J., Ek, F., Olsson, R., Belting, M. & Bengzon, J. (2022). Glioblastoma CD105(+) cells define a SOX2(-) cancer stem cell-like subpopulation in the pre-invasive niche. Acta neuropathologica communications, 10, Article ID 126.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glioblastoma CD105(+) cells define a SOX2(-) cancer stem cell-like subpopulation in the pre-invasive niche
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2022 (English)In: Acta neuropathologica communications, E-ISSN 2051-5960, Vol. 10, article id 126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Glioma stem like cells (GSC) represent the highest cellular hierarchy in GBM and have a determining role in tumor growth, recurrence and patient prognosis. However, a better definition of GSC subpopulations, especially at the surgical resection margin, is warranted for improved oncological treatment options. The present study interrogated cells expressing CD105 (CD105(+)) specifically within the tumor front and the pre-invasive niche as a potential GSC subpopulation. GBM primary cell lines were generated from patients (n = 18) and CD105(+) cells were isolated and assessed for stem-like characteristics. In vitro, CD105(+) cells proliferated and enriched in serum-containing medium but not in serum-free conditions. CD105(+) cells were characterized by Nestin(+), Vimentin(+) and SOX2(-), clearly distinguishing them from SOX2(+) GCS. GBM CD105(+) cells differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes but not chondrocytes. Exome sequencing revealed that GBM CD105(+) cells matched 83% of somatic mutations in the Cancer cell line encyclopedia, indicating a malignant phenotype and in vivo xenotransplantation assays verified their tumorigenic potential. Cytokine assays showed that immunosuppressive and protumorigenic cytokines such as IL6, IL8, CCL2, CXCL-1 were produced by CD105(+) cells. Finally, screening for 88 clinical drugs revealed that GBM CD105(+) cells are resistant to most chemotherapeutics except Doxorubicin, Idarubicin, Fludarabine and ABT-751. Our study provides a rationale for targeting tumoral CD105(+) cells in order to reshape the tumor microenvironment and block GBM progression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC)BMC, 2022
Keywords
CD105, Glioma stem-like cell, Exome sequencing, Drug screening, Tumor microenvironment
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-484211 (URN)10.1186/s40478-022-01422-8 (DOI)000847356900001 ()36038950 (PubMedID)
Funder
Thorsten and Elsa Segerfalk FoundationRegion SkåneSjöberg Foundation
Available from: 2022-09-14 Created: 2022-09-14 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1585-5434

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